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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




1806-26 



3^ 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

NORTH-CAROLINA CAPE-FEAR 

ASSOCIATION ; 

HOLD EN AT 

Bear MARSii Meeting-House, Duplin County. 

Friday y October 3 1st, 1806. 

1. T7^ LDER Job Goodman delivered the intro- 
J2^ ductory Sermon to a large audience, from 
Mark XVI, 15, And he said imto them, Go ye into 
alt the world, and preach the Gospel to every crea- 
ture, 

2. After divine worship, proceeded to busi- 
ness. 

3. The Association was opened by prayer, by 
Elder Baker. 

4. Elder Baker chosen Moderator. 

5. Bj:other Samuel Buxton, Clerk. 

6. Elder Lewis Whitfield a Delegate from 
Neuse Association, took a scat among us, and by 
him received a letter of correspondence. 

7. Brethren Joseph Thames and James Mat- 
thias appointed as a committee of Finance, to re- 
ceive the contributions, and make settlements. 

8. Elder Wells presented the circular letter: 
Was read and received. 

9. Elders Abram Baker, William Thames 
and Lewis Whitfield, appointed a committee 



seaAi 



( 2 ) 

to examine and revise, if need be, tiie Constituti- 
on and Decorum presented by Brother Needham 
Whitfield. 

10. Appointed to write correspondent letters 
to the following Associations : Elder Oliver, to 
Neuse; Brother James Harden, to Kehukee; El- 
,'.r Thames, to Raleigh; Elder Wells, to San- 
dy Cveek; Elder Baker, to Charleston. 

IL. Adjourned until to-morrow 10 o'clock, 
A. M. by Elder Lewis Whitfield. 

Saturday^ November 1. 
Met from adjournment. Opened by prayer, 
by Elder Thames. 

12. Elder AVh it field from the committee 
appointed to examine the Constitution and Deco- 
rum, reported, that it is thought most advisable 
for the said Instruments to remain in their first 
state; and the same is therefore approved. 

13. This Association taking under their consi- 
deration, an Impeachment of high crimes and mis- 
demeanors on the Journals of the Senate of the 
last General Assembly of the State of North-Ca- 
roiiona, against Elder Baker ; upon which Elder 
Baker, who as Moderator was requested to va- 
cate his seat during the time of investigation of 
the same ; upon which Brother Joseph Thames 
filled his seat as Moderator pro tempore. 

14. This Association believing said charges 
to be unjust and injurious to the Baptist Society, 
Resolved, That Elders Francis Oliver and Job 
Goodman be a committee to draw up a petition 
directed to the Elonorable General Assembly of 
said State, requesting them to relieve Elder Ba- 
ker from such Impeachments, as they in their 
wisdom shall think proper. 

15. Received a letter of correspondence from 
our Sister Raleigh Association, with a number-of 



S 



( s ) 

their Minutes, as a token of their love ; which was 
distributed accordingly. 

16. Received a number of Minutes from our 
Sister Charleston Association, in token of their 
love ; which was distributed also. 

17. Resolved, That the next Association be 
holden at the Seven Miles Meeting-House in 
Sampson County, and that it begin on Saturday 
before the first Lord's Day in November 1807. 
Elder Job Thigpen is requested to preach the 
introductory Sermon. — In case of failure, Elder 
EzEKiEL Bryan. Worship to begin at 1 1 o'clock 
A.M. 

18. Elders Abram Baker and Francis Oliver 
are requested to attend as Delegates totheNeuse 
Association, to be holden at Fort Barnwell Meet- 
Ing-House in Craven County, beginning on Fri- 
day before the third Lord's Day in October 1807; 
and Elder Thames to Raleigh Association. 

19. Elder Job Goodman is requested towrite 
a circular letter for the next Association, upon any 
religious subject. 

20. Elders Whitfield, Wm. Cooper 8c Thames, 
appointed to preach to-morrow. Worship to be- 
gin at 10 o'clock A. M. 

21. The committee of Finance reported as 
followeth : 

Received from Brother Needham"! 
Whitfield, the Treasurer of Neuse 
Association, as being our one half of ;>;^ 9 12 6 
the sum remaining after paying all I 
expences last year, j 

Received from 14 Churches this year 17 15 6 



Now in the Treasury, (^21 8 

22. Brother Samuel Buxton is appointed 
Treasurer. 



I 



{ 4 ) 

'■■■ 23. Adjourned until Monday 10 o^ciock A» 
M. by prayer by Elder Whitfield. 

Lord^s Day^ November 2. 
The Brethren appointed to preach met a large 
audience. Thames preached from Micah iv, 6, 7, 
Cooper from St. John xiv, 19, WHirriELD from 1 
Kings VII, 23, 24, 25, 26. And we hope and 
trust that a divine blessing followed.the labours of 
the day, 

Monday <t November 3. 

24. Met from adjournment. Opened by pray- 
er, by Elder Wm. Cooper. 

25. The Brethren appointed as a committee 
to draw a petition for the relief of Elder Baker, 
presented the same. It was read, and was approv- 
ed of, and was signed by the Moderator pro tern. 
and Clerk. 

26. The corresponding letters to our Sister 
Associations were presented, read and accepted. 

27. Brother Samuel Buxton is requested to 
prepal-e these Minutes for the press ; have 400 
copies printed ; 200 of which are to be distributed 
among the Churches in proportion to the number 
in each Church, of their members ; and the re- 
mainder to the Associations. 

Adjourned by prayer, by Elder Oliver. 

The Members from each Church marked or 

distinguished thus, Ministers in Small Capitals, 

unordained Preachers in Italicks, Ministers not 

present thus,* Churches with no Pastor thus, — 

ABRAHAM BAKER, Moderator. 

SAMUEL BUXTON, Clerk. 



r-» 



\ 






V 



I 

Report \ 



Counties and Churches. 



, I. Blatlen, 
Bsaver Dam* 

2. Bladen, 
Seven Creeks. 

3. Brunswick, 
Levingston's Creek. 

4. Brunsivick, 
Lockwood's Folly. 

5. r.amberland, 
Cape-Fear. 

6. Duplinj 
]3ear IVlarsh. 

7. Duplin, 
Muddy Creek. 

8. New-Hanover, 
Bull Tail. 

9. Onsloy, 
New-River. 

10. Robeson, 
Ashe Pole. 

n. Robeson, 
Saddle Tree. 

12. Sampson, 

Cnhary. 

!3. Sampson, 
Mingo. 

!4. Sampson, 
^even Miles, 



Ministers 8c Delegates 



William Coopee, 
James Jesop, 

Job Goodmaw, 
John Best, 

FZKKIKL BrXAK,* 

Zacliariah Murrell, 

Abraham Bakeb, 
/ibsalom Robins., 

William Thames, 
Joseph Thames, 

Francis Oliver, 
James Harden, 

Job Thigpew, 
Jostph Johnston^ 

William Wells, 
Samuel Buxton, 

Jesse Wekb,, 
Jacob Wood, 

IsoM Pitman,* 
Noah Pitman, 
Daniel Loe, 

Wi.i. Hawthorn* 
Jesse Fdlk, 
Dennis Lcnon, 
Plket Cooper, 
Jdtr.es Matthias, 

Aaron Moore,* 
vVilliafii Layfon, 
Ecien Dudley,— 
Alexander Benton, 
David Grantham, 



rm fourteen Churches^ 



21 



Dismis- 




,Excom- 






sed by 


Restored. 


munica- 


Deceased 


Number. 


letter. 




cated. 







Sums 
contributed* 



68 £ % 



83 



51 



120 



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5S 



6S 



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109 



196 



94 



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IS 



10 



1 7 6 

I Is 



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22 42 



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( 6 ) 

The Cape-Fear Baptist Association, assembled 
at Saddletree Meeting-Housc, Robeson County 
North-Carolina, October 1805, 

To the Churches they represent^ send greeting, 
DEAR BRETHREN, 

THE annual addresses contained in the mi- 
nutes of the several Associations, have furnished 
you with treatises on very important subjects, both 
in doctrinal and practical Godliness. Permit us 
to stir up your pure minds by way of remem- 
brance, while we inculcate at present on your 
minds the great duty of humility, highly recom- 
mended and enforced by our blessed Lord and his 
Apostles, and is that grace which adorns the 
Christian Profession, it bein?^ the greatest imita- 
tion of him that came down frora heaven, namely, 
the Lord Jesus Christ, who is the Christian's life 
and hope. To repeat all the scripture pertinent 
to the subject, would be to transcribe a consider- 
able part of the New Testament — for a compen- 
dium read Mat. 18th chapter. Mat. 20, 20 — 28 
Luke 18, 9, 14 PhiL 2d, 5, 9, 1 Peter 5, 5, 6, 
James 4, 10. The import of humility may be 
gatheredfrom the aforecited scriptures, and others 
to the same effect. 

1. With respect to God, it views him in his 
divine perfections ; acknowledges his supremacy 
and sovereignty, with a subjection to his will. 

2. Self abasement or a lowly mind, a consci- 
ousness of defect or imperfection in ourselves, is 
a property of humility ; and as every virtue has 
its contrary vice, and where a d'ltv is commanded 
the contrary sin is forbidden, let us glance at the 
opposite for the better illustration of the amiable 
grace of humility, the opposite of which is pride. 
This sin got early birth in the world j it appears 



A 



( 7 ) 

to have had a powerful influence in the fall of 
man, Gen. 3, 6. The baneful effect is spread 
through human nature, so that pride is not a novel 
thing in the world; but as it principally resides 
in the heart, it is not at all times apparent to the 
human mind. It manifests itself in the outward 
behaviour in different ways ; it has a tendency to 
promote self, and is dishonorable to God. The 
opposite of this is humility. But is there any oc- 
casion for Church Members to be cautioned with 
respect to pride ? No doubt there is such a thing 
as spiritual pride ; the Daughters of Zion are 
haughty. There was a reasoning amongst the 
Disciples who should be greatest. Our Lord's 
admonition to be humble was principally to his 
followers. To excite to humility, know that it is 
what the Lord requires of you, Micah 6, 8. And 
we can inform you on warrantable grounds, Isa. 
57, 15, that with the humble the Lord will dwell, 
by his soul reviving, heart comforting presence* 
The poor in spirit are heirs of a blessing that 
contain in it a kingdom, and that the kingdom of 
heaven. The humility we recommend is not the 
product of nature, but the fruit of the spirit of 
Christ, who says " Learn of me, for I am meek 
and lowly in heart, and ye shall find rest to your 
souls." 

Beloved Brethren, we claim no dominion over 
your faith, but wish to be helpers of your joy. 
Do not imagine that our present address is calcu- 
lated or designed to deprive you of Christian Li- 
berty; we only think it needful to subjoin the A- 
postle's exhortation, Use not liberty for an occa- 
sion to the flesh, but by love serve one another ; 
let each esteem others better than themselves. 
The Lord will beautify the meek with salvation. 
Your suffering time will soon be gone, ye humble 
souls ; exaltation will succeed ; a rest remains to 



( 8) 

the people of God. O, the glorious scene! whem 
there is day without night, joy without grief, 
pleasure without pain. Eternity crowns the bliss. 
Grace be with you all, AJVXEN. 



Wilmington; printed by A. Hall. 
For printing this, 15 dollars. 



%. 



/m7 



verse, inth the in'mrl.^ I myself ser^-je the Irkt? of" 
Cor/, but with thejtesk the law of sin. Solen;*- 
nity; seemed to pppqar in almost every face, 
and we trust and hope that the labours of ire 
day, will terminate greatly to the glory oiCcd 
and good and comfort of many souis". 

'MONDAY, iVbi't^mfcr' 2. 
Met from adiournment. 
1^ 5. Association opened by prayer, by Fider 
W iLLiAM Wells. 

16. The Brethren appointed to write cor- 
respondent letters, handed tliem fr>rward. They 
were read,- and approved of, and signed accor- 
dingly, by Moderator and Clerk. 

17. Brother Francis L> Haynes^ is re^ 
quested to write a circular letter upon any reli*. 
gious subject, by our next Association. 

18. Appointed Brethreh a& a cditimitteg, to 
go- and' endeavour to teconcjie soiue d'rspuies 
in Elder Aaron MboRE's'Qiiirehi viz,. Elder, 
Francis Oliver, Elder^HAMES, ElderGooD- 
MAN, Elder Brown, Elder ElRep Cooper, Bro- 
th eri^ifzYfif^, ElderTniGPEN, whoare requested to 
make report of their procje^dingsip our uq.jX A?:-^ 
sociation. 

19. Resolved, thatonr next Associatlop. be; 
holden in New-Hanover County, at Moore's 
Creek Meeting-House; to commence on Satur- 
day before-the first Lord's day in October, ISOS, 
at 10 o'clock. ,^ :? 

20. Elder Job Thi<;pen is requested- to 
preacb the Sermon introductory, and in c^se of 
failure^ Brother Francis L. Haynes, 



;^1 . ""Brethren appointed as a committee 
Finance to receive th'" contributions, and 
make settlements, report as follow : — 

£, s,. (I 

Ballance in the Treasury from 7 27 8 

last year 5 

Rec'd. this yeair from 17 Churches 21 2 G 

Total 
For Printing the minutes and > 
constitution and the decorum S 



Paid Elder Oliver as a delegate 
to Neuse Association 



48 


10 


6 


8 


10 





40 





6 


. 3 









37 6 



Paid Elder Thames, as a dele- 7 « o o 
gate to Raleigh Association $ ^ 



• Paid Brother Samuel Buxton, 
for his services in preparing 
the minutes for the press 




Kemaining in the Treasury jC 29 6 

22. Brother Sameul Buxton is requested 
to have 400 copies ot these Minutes Printec. 
and distribute them as formerly, 

23. The Association adjourned by prayc 
by Elder Thigpen, to time and place befco 
mentioned. 

( Signed ) 

FRANCIS OLIVER, Moderator. 
SAMUEL BUXTON, ClerL 



^vlsfi, 



( S ) 

CIRCULAR LETTER. 



The Ministers and Messengers that compose the 
Cape-Fear Association^ to the several Churches 
they represent., ..Send Christian love. 

DEARLY BELOVED BRETHREN, 

FOR a number of years past you have been 
addressed by way of a eircular letter, in which 
time and way, your attention has been called to a 
number of agreeable and interesting subjects — 
And as our last to you was on the Graces of Hu- 
mihty, which is so desirable, and which adorns 
and beautifies the Christian Professor, we think 
it most proper, at this time to point out to you, 
some of the marks of Pride, by which you will be 
better able to know whether you are the trulv 
humble or not. Pride has its ebbingsandflow- 
ings according to the high or low opinion that a 
person has of himself; it generally uses a great 
deal of flattery, and is fond of praise. — This too 
often is seen in professors of religion, particular- 
ly in some Preachers of the Gospel, who appear 
to leave the stage with an ear of attention to hear 
whether they are applauded or not. But it might 
be more proper to look for the fountain from 
which pride originates. Let the Scripture be 
our guide., — Solomon says in Prov. xii, 5, Every 
one that is proud in heart is an abomination to the 
"Lord, Again in Psalms ci. 5, the Lord informs 
us that him who hath an high look and a proud 
heart, will not he suffer. From hence we may 
discover that pride *has got a place in the heart, 
and is in some measure connected with all the 
other abominations ihat proceed from the saiT' 



( 6 ) 

35ut prick will more plainly appear iii the follow- 
ii>g parliculars: 

■; "First. It is to be discovered in looks, Prov. 
"*^'yi. 17. Here the Lord names seven abomina- 
tions, the first of which is pride, ihut is ii proud 
look, which is 7iot comely in any professor of re- 
ligion, but has the v/orst appearance in a Preach*- 
cr of the Gospel. Again,. Prov x-ii. 10. Oniyi. 
by pride comet h conterdion. This also is an evil 
and produces evil effects, even to the separating 
very friends, while it has caused great coldness 
among brethren. Alast is it not to be fv^ared 
that too many professors among us, study the 
scriptures more for contention than any thing 
else, and daily manifest the same by asking 
questions and making enquiry what is the mean? 
ing of those things that they themselves are 
already instructed in. Such people must aim 
at contention, or intend to shev/ their own abi- 
lities, or wish to expose the ignorance of others; 
Take it which vvay you please, it has the appear- 
ance of pride. Such must have little respect to 
the command of the Lord, Prov. xyii, 14. Leave 
off contention before it be meddled with. Again, 
P/'ou. xvi, 18. Pride goeth before destruction^ and 
a haughty spirit before a fall. From hence we 
may see the cause why so many professors of 
religion are so often falling into transgression 
^.d bring reproach upon religion, which they 
profess, and wound the cause of God. Then 
|f pride be the cause of contention, an4 an inlet 
•^o destruction, we may conclude it i^ the mother 
of almost all evils. May we not .conclude just- 
V, that pride is the cause of so m?^r>y persuasi- 
•Qt religion. Here the Qeista took their rise,- 



■he world. Pride 

and neglect duty, 

^ .^iHcom-orm toali thecustems and fashi- 

oi the world, and is more apt to make an 

uamtance with he .o^reat and popolar than 

•n the meek and lowly. Again, pride is apt 

dsspise the poc r, although th'e Lord /la/h 

^ser^tfir. to b- hein of his kingdom, Janiesi? 

For us to shew all the the iSaarks of pride 

A. 

would far exceed the bounds of a circular letter; 
but be assured it is the oposite of humility, and 
will try to evade the cross, and carry God's dear 
children to dlslionor their heavenly Father. But 
beloved, we are persuaded better things of you ; 
and though we speak thus, we hope you are the 
contrite ones, with whom Jesus delights to dwell ; 
that you are the poor in spirit, snd -as '^"d 
heirs of the Kingdom of Heaver 
Oh ! brethren, if this is thy ■ 
fections on things above, no* 
and pray mightily to the F 
enable you to mortify ^ver 
and endeavour to abs^in 
of evil-; ^nd forget not v 

■ 1 ' ' -M^L^. 



( 6 ) 

l^ut pride will more plainly appear in the follow-. 
ii)g particulars: 

First. It is to be discovered in looks, Prov. 
VI. 17. Here the Lord names seven abomina- 
tions, the first of v/hich is pride, that is a proud 
look, which is not comely in any professor of re- 
ligion, but has the v/orst appearance in a Preach^ 
cr of the Gospel. " Again^ Prov z ii. 10. Otiiy 
by pricle comet h conteiition. This also is an evil 
and produces evil effects, even to the separating 
very friends, while it has caused great coldness 
among brethren. Alast is it not to be Lared 
that too many professors among us, study fhc 
scriptures mure for contention than any thing 
else, and daily manifest the same by asking 
questions and making enquiry v/hat is the mean- 
ing of those things that they themselves are 
aTready instructed in. Such people must aim 
at contention, or intend to shev/ their own abi- 
lities, or wish to expose the ignorance of othersi 
Take it which way you please, it has the appear- 
ance of pride. Such must have little respect to 
the command of the Lord, Prov. xvii, 14. Leave 
v/f contention b:^Joreitbe meddled with. Again, 
Prov'. xvi, 18. Pridt goeth before destruction., and 
a haughty spirit before a Jail. From hence we 
may see the cause why so many professors of 
religion are so often falling into transgression 
'.d bring reproach upon religion, which they 
profess, and wound the cause of God. Then 
;f pride be the cause of contention, and an inlet 
•^o destruction, we may conclude it i^ the mother 
of almost all evils. May we not .conclude just- 
H-', that pride is the cau^e of so m?.ny persuasi- 
of religion. Here the Qeists took their rise,- 



ne v/orid. Pride 

and neglect duty, 

./•iiicontorm to all the customs and fashi. 

A the world, and is more apt to make an 

uaintance with he g^reat and popolar than 

n tne meek and ioxxhy. Again, pride is apt 

despise the poc r, ahhough th'e Lord //a//J 

"^^ frin^^to h hein ofhh kingdom, James U 

5, 6. '^"^ ^ •>■ ' -^4 

For us to shev/ all the the fisarks of pride 

would far exceed the bounds of a circular letter; 

but be assured it is the oposite of humility, and 

will try to evade the cross, and carry God's dear 

childi^n to dishonor th^elr heavenly Father. But 

beloved,, we are persuaded better things of you : 

and though we speak thus, we hope you are the 

contrite ones, with whom Jesus delights to dwell j^ 

that you are the poor in spirit, ?»nd -^^^ = 

heirs of the Kingdom of Heaver 

Oh ! brethren, if this is thy 
fections on things above, no* 
and pray mightily to the F 
enable you to mortify ever 
and endeavour to absfttin 
of evil*; ^nd forget not f 

1 



FEANi 



SAMmi,^BVSrON, Clers. 



Frliited by A. HALL. 



MINUTES 



&V TS» 



^ORTILCAROLINJ CAFE-FEAR ASSOCIATION. 



§«OLP?N A'C- 



l>f CORE'S CREEK MEETING-HOUSE, 



tS NEW-HANOVER COUNTY* 



^'jtffSDAYf OctOSER ISts At D9 18C3j| 



fc:^®4:«>j< 



WILMINGTON^ 

■^RSNTEa AT.TgK OifFICE O? W« 9, HASBlLa 



MINUTES, he. 

1. THE Association met agreeable to appointment. 

2. Elder Thigpen, who was appointed to preach the 
Sermon introductory, met a large audience, and preached 
from I Tim. 3d chap. 15th" verse: " But if' I tarry long^ 
that thou may est know how thou oughtest to behave thy- 
self in the house ofGod^ which is the church of the livitig 
Gocl, the piUur and grmtnd of the truth." We trust a 
lasting and divine blessing will follow the labors of the 

3. Proceeded to business, a^eeablc to order. — Prayer 
by Elder Goodman. Elected brother Joseph Thames, 
Moderator; brother Samuel, Buz,ton^ Clerk j and brother 
James Rapheil, Assistant-Clerk. 

4th. Appointed brethren Watkins and Wingate, ■ a 
committee of finance, to receive the contributions, make 
settlements, and make reports. 

5. Received reports from sixteen Churches, by dele- 
gates and letter, with their contributions, which will here- 
after be annexed^ 

6. Received a new constituted Church in fellowship 
from Wilmington, by delegates and letter. 

7. Resolved^ That .Elder WE.iiX.s. prepare a circular 
letter for this Association, upon some religious subject, 
instead of the letter brothex Haync^ was to write, which 
has not come forward. 

8. Agreed that brother Will'iam Wingate, brother John 
Larkins, and brother Samuel Buxton, be a committee to 
revise said letter, if need be. 



&, Resshed* that Elder Job Goodman be a delegate 
to Raleigh Association ; also, to write and carry a corres- 
pondent letter — and that brother WiUiam TFingate write 
to Charleston Asaociation, brother Jacob IFilliams^ to 
Kehukee Association, and brother Benjamin Davis, to 
Flat River Association. ^, 

10. Resolved, that Elder Carter, Elder Goodman, 
and Elder Thames, prea<;h to-morrow,. Divine service, 
to begin at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

11. Then adjon-rned, in order, tiU Monday^ 10 o*clock. 
Prayer by Elder Carter. 

MONDAY, October 3, 1808. 

12. Met from adjournment, and proceeded in order.-- 
Prayer by Elder Thames. 

13. Received a Church from Robeson county, intojel- 
lowship, by delegates and letter, by petition. 

14. The brethren who were appointed to write the 
correspondent letters, handed them forward. The let- 
ters were read and approved of. 

15. Elder Br.yant appointed to write the circular let- 
ter for the next year. 

16. Brother Samuel Buxton is requested to write a 
short memoir on the death of Elders Baker and Oliver, 
and have the same annexed to these Minutes. 

17. Resolved, that our next association be held at New 
River,. Chaple Run, Onslow county, to begin the Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in October 1809, to commence 
at 10 o'clock, A. M. and that Elder E. Bryant preach the 
Sermon introductory ; and in case of failure. Elder 
Wells. 

18. By reason of ilon-report from our committee sent 



(4 ) 

last year to Elder Moore's Creek, the same now lays open' 
for a future time for examination. 

,19. Brother Samuel Buxton is requested to prepare 
these Minutes for the press; ha-ve four hundred copies 
printed ; three hundred of them he is- to distribute among 
the Churches, as is usual, and the other hundred among 
our sister correspondent Associations. 

20. The brethren appointed as a committee of finance, 
came forward with their leport. It was examined, found, 
correct, and ordered to be entered accordingly. 

31. Return by report, says, in the treasury from last year, £. 29 Sr 
Contributed this year, -- - - , - 2110 0' 

Paid brother Samuel Buxton for his services) - 

Paid for printing the Minutes for this year, • 

Paid Elder Goobman, as a delegate to Raleigh, r 

Paid Elder Wei,ls, as a delegate to Neuse, - 

Remaining in the Treasury, - - - - " 37 # 

22. The Association adjourned in order, to the place 
antd time before mentioned, by prayer by Elder Wells. 
(Signed) 

JOSEPH THVMES, Moderator. 
SAMUEL BUXTON, Ckrk. 



50 


10 


6 


7 


10 





43 


O 


6 


7 


10 





35 


10 


« 


4 


10 


a 


31 





6 


4 









(5) 

LORD'S DAT. 

^I'he brethren appointed to preach to-day, met a large 
audience. Elder C a r ti:r preached from Rem. 4th chap, 
and 25th verse : ^^ JFho ivas delivered for -our offences j 
and was raised again for our justification,''' Elder Good- 
man, from P/zzVz^i 2d chap. &c 13 th verse: ^!' For it is God 
which worketh in yoit both to will and tb do of his good 
pleasure.*' Elder Thames, from the first and second 
paragraphs in the 47th chap, oi EzekieL ^The spiiit 
from above, we trust, gave liberty both to speakers and 
hearers ; for it appeared that many were riigh to cry out. 
What shall wc do to be saved? From which, we hope 
a divine and lasting impression will follow, so as to pro- 
duce trust to the glory of our God, and good and comfort 
ofZion. 



|e!T» In tht follo'wing report, »11 ordained Preachers are in tfttall capitals % 
unordaincd Preachers, in Italics ; Ministers not present, thu« * : Churches 
with no Pnstor, thiTs \ ; Churches where no report i$ mnde) ar« left blank} 
«Dd their number tttands as last year. 



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f^ 5 




e ^ 


■J 1**- •- 5 L. tf 


Churc 

andCc 

ties 


Minis! 

and D 

gale; 




53 u 


5-2 


C 


*- re 




In tul! 

lowsh 

Sum 

Cont 

butc 


1 Bladen 
Beaver Dam. . \, 


IVm, Xemp, 
■ .. Ren. Duxisy 


5 






I 


1 


"^ 


8,J 


CI io 


2 Bladen 


Job Goodman, 


6 


I 








2 


89 


I 


Seven Creeks, 


Edwd. Conner, 








3 Brunswick 


EZL. Bryant,' 


1 




1 




2 


1 


51 


I 


Livingston Creek. 


James Lewis, 






4 Brunswick 


Jibsolom EQbinSy 


9 




4 






n 


1 1, 


1 Id 


LockwoddsFolly.l 


Wm. Wingate,. 








.1 *o 

1 


75 'Cumberland 


Wm. Thames, 


U 


I 


S 




2 


I 
3 212 


1 10 


■ Cape Feai' 


J. Thames, 
















6 Duplin 
Bear Marsh. | 


Leten Wadkins, 
Durham Grady, 


3 




6 




3 


4 92 


1 5 


7 Duplin 


Job Thigpkn, 


1 




4 




2 


3 157 


2 


Muddy Creek 


J. Johnson^ 


Mt 








8 Duplin 


Jacob Williams, 


3 


1 








35. 


15 


Limestone. t 


James Rapbeil, 
















9 D<iplin 


James Reorden, 


2 








I 


I 30 


I y5. 


Nagluingo. I 


Isaac Middleton, 












■ 




10 N. Hanover 


Wm. Wells, 













3 


«n 


I 


BuH Tale 


Saml. Buxton, 












-" 




11 N. Hanover 


Jfohn LarkinSf 














20 


lO 


Wilmington, i 


Peter Smyth, 


















12 Onslow 


Silas Carter. 


5 


2 










27 


15 


Chapel Run. 


William Cox, 


















13 Onslow 


Jesse Webb, 


2 




18 


1 




I 


25 


5 


So. West. t 


James King, 


















14 Robinson 


IsoM Pitman, 


I 


2 




1 


11 


I 


91 


2 13 


A^hpole. 


James Pitinan, 


















15 Robinson 
















101 




Saddle Tree* 






f . 


'■■•-'■ 












16 Bladen 


J. Singletary, 


.•■•;. 


r; J" 


■ i " f. 






1 


33 


1 S 


Big Swamp. | 


Elias Nichols, 


















17 Sampson. 


James Matthias, 


2 




2 




6 


2 


180 


I 10 


Cohary. 


Jble Moat, * 


















18 Sampson 


Charles Ingram, *' 






2 









. ^^ 


IS 


Mingo 


Moses Warrick, 














j 




19 Sampson 


David Grantham^ 


1 


3 


8 3 


6 




i 88 


1 


Seven Miles, | 


John Few. 












1 




122 


10 

i 


48 8 


34 


■25 1491 /:2112 

1 ^ . M. , ■ >. 



(7) 
CIRCULAR LETTER. 

The Cape^Fear Baptist Association^ at Moore's Creek 
Meeting- House ^ New-Hanover county, to the Churches 
that compose the same — sciid Christian love^ 

Dear Brethren, 

Having y^u in remembrance, we send you this epis- 
tle on Christian patience. The holy scripture abounds 
in commendation of this grace- — Heb. 10 &: 36: " For 
ye have need of patience^ that after ye have done the will' 
of God, ye might receive the promise.^^ Patience is a 
waiting, enduring grace ; it waits for the accomplishment 
of a promise. Thus it is said of Abraham, that after he 
had patiently endured, he obtained the promise — Heb. 
6, 15. The apostle James represents this grace by the 
husbandman, waiting for the precious fruit of the earth, 
and hath long patience for it until he receives the early 
and the latter rain. The same apostle, treating on pati- 
ence, says, " Beholdy we count them happy xvhich en- 
dure " Christians, in their pilgrimage, have need of pa- 
tience : They have much in promise, but must wait for 
the full possession ; and their entering into that bliss is 
throLigh much tribulation. Many are the affections of- 
the righteous. This was exemplified in the person of 
Job — says the apostle, '' Te have heard of the patience of 
fob, and have seen the end of the Lord ; that the Lord is 
very pit fid and of tender met fy." Ye have need of pati- 
tience with respect to things temporal and spiritual; the 
due exercise of which will be useful in the duty of for- 
bearance, torgiving injuries, loving enemies, and keeping 



(8 ) 

the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace. Patience 
stands connected with Godliness and content ; which 
the apostle says, " is great gain^ having the promise of 
the life that now is^ and of that which is to come: in your 
patience^ possess ye your ^ouls" >. Let patience have her 
perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting 
nothing. There is a connection of graces helpfull to 
' 'each other, and God is the author of every good gift. — 
Look to the Lord for the accomplishment of those great 

• and precious promises ; casting all your care upon him 
who hath cared for you ; and we desire, brethren, that ye 

^ be not slothfuly but followers of them, who, through faith 
and patience, inherit the promise. May the God of 
I peace, and love be with yoUi — Amen, 
> (Signed) 

; JOSEPH THAMES, Moderator. 
SAMUEL BUXTON, C/(?r^. 

MEMOIR, 
' Of our beloved brothers i^ Elder ^aker and Elder Oliver, 
toho departed this life since our last association. 
Ye sv they are gone, for their seats with us are empty 
and their counsel lacking. tThey v/ho were great men 
of God, v/ho were much esteemed among the people, and 
■often presided among the people in our assemblies ; they 
who were faithful watchmen upon the walls of Jerusa- 
lem-^-yes, loving shepherds, loving husbands, loving fa- 
thers, loving to their neighbors and kind to their servants, 
^ both by example and precept ; beloved citizens both in 

* church and state — the great men are fallen ! wlrose con- 
' versations were ^ver kind and address amiable j constaat- 



(9 ) . 

ly using arguments very prevaillti^— «50 that all who 

were intimately acquainted with them may say, yes, tru- 
ly say, that they in all their interviews were iru y lovely — 
for if there were any virtue and any praise, they thought 
on these things— whenever the eye saw the^, it gave 
witness to them, and the ear heard them, it gave heed 
unto the n. — 'But now they are gone to rest, from ail their 
labors, so that their works may follow tiiem. 

They kept the bright character tiicy had in view, 

With an undoubted right : 

By fair examples to assert their fame 

Kow when the tribute of our praise we give, 

They by their worth to endless fame survive, 

We cannot let pass, not to scan 

The praise of these mighty men. 

May we all with equal steps 

Their track of virtue tread ; 

May we go on in all their noble parts, 

And every virtue exercise their art, 

For the world will much expect from us : 

But let none the hallowed ways pretend to tread, 

But what are by heavenly motives led. 

We would to God that all our lives may be 

Equal to theirs in love to God, with sincerity. 

Oh that it might be the Heavenly father's gracious will 

That young successors of their arts, 

May share an equal portion of their skill. 

Departed broihers, will you accept of praise, 

Altho' now lying in your graves ? • .•' 

Oh might our pertormance worthier be, 

For its scanty foliage is justly due to thee. 

By order f)f 'he Association. 

(Sigu«d) SAMUEL BUXTON, CcrL 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



mRTH CAROLINA 



Capc^ipcar 23apt!.dt ^.#aeiation. 



IIOLDIN AT 



mwRlVER, CHAPEL~.RUN MEETim^HOUSE, 



ONSLOW COUNTY. 



Oir SAfURBAr, SBPfEMBER SO rn, A* D, 180^, 



WILMINGTON, h\ c, 

fRon TBE pKES»oF W. ». HASELt» 



SATURDAY StPTi.: Ki.R no I8uy. 

1, The iatroJiuitory Scrm in, by ap;;o'pnvK;nt, 
was jreaciied by h.lcler ^'"zexiel B y Kirv, lo a 
large aridience, irom ii Samuchi x/.iii ( hiipter, 
5ih. Verse : '' A'thotigh my hciisc be not iG w.lh 
Cich yet lie hnfh met !e wit't mr an I'va/nstinu cav" 
er.^:nf, ordertd in ail things and sun"'. Jt-'^ ih^'S.is 
cii my sa!iuitlon a?id all my desired, alt/i ii;^/i he 
Viakc it not to grav ' Serl(.nsness aj)[;eaieti in 
almost every lace ; from which, we hf>^;e, a Di- 
vine [blessing will t()ilo\v the words preac^hed 

2 Aiier Worship, . the Society proceeded to 
business; the decomm was read ; the .Vssoeiatioa 
\v;is opened, hi order by :'rayer, by Elder Good- 
man. 

3 Brother JosEiMi i'uAiviEs was ap])ointcd Mo- 
derator, and d'roLi'.er S.ami'El' D-.'xto:c, Cierl:, 
and Broii er Javes Kaphli d, a;isi^ianl C lerk. 

4. Appointed Brerhren V\ i i.-:m i ox i.nd Ja- 
cob W'lui lA-iS, a ComiTiiitee o I'iiiancc, to re* 
ceu^e the Cojitributions. maivC settlemenis and re- 
port the san.e- 

5. Vusitrig :.rethfen, from our different Sister 
Associations, were invited to take seats amoii^ 
lis. Idder ' HI -PEN, from South Carolina, I'duer 
KooNCE, from Xues, Llder Tk \ryj.ES» from Ca^.e 
lear, ilder I homas from Raleigh all of whoni 
came forward accorchngly, and ook ^.eats. 

6. Then received 'reports from seventeen 
Churches, throagh tiieir iJ)eiegaccs, and letters 



( 3 ) 

yr.-.h th c'r rontribmions; a correct statement of 
the : a:i;e,, will, hereiiiito. be annexed 

7. Tlte (Jiicular Letter, fur this year, was- 
hall i ; fo'ward by Elder Bryant. It was read' 
xm\ .;v:p'0 td of, 

• 8. ' re ihren were then appointed to write Corrcs- 
pond'ii;^ Letters to our bister rVssociations, viz: 
Klder Thames, to write a-Kl carry to Haleigh- 
Associritkjn ; llder Davis to I\ ues Association ; 
Klder W'-.LLs to Kehttkee Association ; Brother 
CiiAH' Es Mc \Li isTER to < harlestoH .Yssociatma 
aiiri ''ro;her Jacob Wl.liams to the Flat River- 
AjiSociitTorr. 

o. Received a Corresponding Letter from our 
Sister, t'-ie i\ues Associanon, lotrcther with some 
coi)i2s of her iVimiites, as a lokeii of her love to 
us ']'l,e v'(.[ries ueie distributed accordingly." 

10. HrGther Joseph i hames, is requesed tO' 
write the Circular Letter, for next year Asso- 
Giaiicn. 

1 ] . i 'Ider Job Goodm ak s' as appointed to preach 
tlie Sermon introductory f n* our next Association, 
and in case of any fadure, I' ider Benjamin Davis.. 

12. 'Met' re n apronuud to preach To-morrow,) 
rider ' I'll A M ES, Klder Cioo • i an and Llder J a mes 
'^i HI OPEN, Irom Sotuh Carolina 

13. Then adjourned uiuil .vionday, nne oclock. 
Trayer by Klder Thames. 

SUNDAY ^CTocKR 1st. 1809. 

- The Frehren appointed to preach today met Vk 
large and extensive company , Kldeh Gjoum^vv? 



(40 

^rst on the stage, preached from ii Timothy it 

Ch^p. 15 verse, '•'Study to shew thyself approved 
unto Go(l^ a workman that 72 rede th not to be as ham" 
ed^ rightly dividing the ivord of Truths h.LDER 
Thames, who followed him, preached from Zacha. 
»iAH, the ivth Chap, and 1, 2, 3, and 4th verses; 
E.LDER James \ higpen, from the first iv.pistle of 
John ivth Chap, and the latter clause of the 8th 
verse, *• God w love " Great liberty was given in 
speaking, and the audience appeared to be very 
solemn, from which, we think, the spirit from 011 
high worked in many to the glory of God ; for 
which we pray to Almighty God, to enlarge the 
Orders of Zion in abundance. 

MONDAY, OcTopER 2, 1809. 

14. Met from adjournment ; the Association was 
opened, in order by prayer, by Elder Wells. 

15. Resolved, that Elder Thames and Elder 
Goodman visit all the churches in our bounds of 
this Association and preach in all their Meeting 
Houses regularly once in the year, they, the said 
brethren, are, hereby, requested in their travels to 
enquire into the cause of there being no Report 
from Saddle-Tree Church this year, and make 
report at our next Association ; in case of failure 
in either of the said brethren, Elder Job Thigpen 
is requested to fill said vacancy. 

16. It is hereby requested, that every Church, 
belonging to our Association, consider the labors 
©f the before mentioned visiting brethren> ia their 
contribuiions to our next Association. 



( 5 ) 

17. Then to signify, in their letters to the Asso- 
ciation, their approbation or disapprobation, respect- 
ing visiting brethren as aforesaid 

18. The brethren appointed to write the cor- 
responding letters on Saturday, handed them for- 
ward for examination, which were read and appro- 
ved of. 

19. The Committee of Finance came forward 
with their Report, which was as follows, viz : 

/Amount in the Trea«uiy from last year - j^ 27 6 
Received thU year - - - - - 17 5 

44 5 6 
Paid for printinpj the last year's Minutes, - 7 10 

Paid the Clerk for his services. - . - 10 
Paid Elder Thamts for his se« vices, • . 4^ 

Paid Elder Davis for nis seivices, - - -3 

24 10 1 



Remaininp: in the Treasury, » - ^ £. \9 is 6 

20. Then received into this Associat! "^n a new 
^constituted Church by petition and Delegates, 
Onslow county, Everitt's Meeting House, which 
Church is comprised in the before mentioned 
Churches. 

21. Brother Samuel Buxton is requested to pre- 
pare these minutes for the F ress,have four hundred 
Copies printed and distribute them as usual. 

22. Resolved, that our next Association be held 
in Cumberland county, Cape-Fear Cedar Creek 
Meeting House, to commence on the Saturday 
before the first ,hunday in C October 1810, service la 
begin at 10 o'clock, A.M. Adjourned by prayer 
by Elder Goodman. 

fc;- A\ JOSEPH THAMES, il/oz/^mfor, 
V^iignea; SAMUEX- BUXTON, CkrL 




XT. ^ 
C t 

«> f 

^-? 

CO -^ 
4j in 

0- 2 
•_ ^ 

|£ 



c j: 

C «] 

•-• 3 

.A 



Bladen 
Beaver Dana. 

2. Columbus 
Seven Creek-. 

3. Bladen 
Big: tSwamp. 

4. Brunswick 
Livingston. 

3. Brunswick 
Lockvvoids Folly. 

6. Cumberland 
Cape Fear. 

7. Duplin 
Bear Marsh. 

8. Duplin 
Muddy Creek. 

9. Duplin 
Liniestone. 

10. Duplin. 
Nahungo. 

11. NevT-Ha''.over 
Bull Tale. 

12. New- Hanover 
WiImins;ton. 

13. Onslow 
Chaple-Run. 

14. Onslow 
South West. 

1 5. Onflow 
Fverits meeting H 

16. Robinbon 
A^h Pole. 

17. Robinson 
Saddle Tiee. 

18. Samp on 
Cohary. 

19. Sampson 
Seven Miles. 

20. Sampson 
Mingo. 



Si bJ 



I 

^ a; 



Abi aham Jessop, 
D^-mpsy Evtritt, 

Job Goodman, 
Shadr ck Wooten, 
Thonnas Hector, , 
Jos Sint<leiary. ^j 

EZEKIEL BkYANT. 

'John Biyunt^ 

Samuel Btll^ , 

Jchi Clewis, 

Jo. Thi.mes, 

Ch<.rles M'Allisier, 
Rfnjasiin Davis, 
Dui hyni Grady. 

Job I HIGPEN, 

Jo. Johnston., 
Jacob W ill'ajis, 
James P.yhitld, | 
Ji'-j-ies Rearden, , 
Ldward Pearcell ^ 
WxLLiAM Wells, 
Saniuel Biixion, 
Simon Sellars, , 
Reuben Evetilt, ^ 
Silas Carter, 
Williams Cox. 
^esse Webb. 
Jame5> King, 
John Gornto, , 

Daniel Nixon. '^ 



Simon Hobbs 
'Al'xandt-r Benton,! 
; Shadr ack Hol/jy . | 

Moics Warrick. '■ 



12 



36 



62 7 




4' 1 



1 19 



S3 
57 
1: 
224 
101 
169 
36 
31 
67 
24 
31 
34 
26 
91- 
101 
180 
34 
72 

1514 



15 
15 

17 5 
<C. s. 



(7 ) 

CIRCULAR LETTER. * 

« The Cape Fear Baptist Association, at Chapei-Run Meeting' House, OiiS' 
lonv County to the Churches, that cotnpose the same, send Christian love* 

DKAR BRETHREN. 

• After entertiiining you these many years 

with many choice and instructing subjects, we call 
your attention in order to stir up your pure minds, 
to remember that Gre-^t Command of our Lord 
" To watch and pray, least ye enter into tempta- 
tion." 1st. The comrnand is, watch now. Watch- 
ing is being on our guard against temptation : Let 
us consider the Tt-mpters, the World, th^ Flesh, 
and the Devil ; now, when a so id is converted to 
God, it is a time of temptation, these enemies take 
hold of the remains of our corrupted nature and 
strive to draw us away, so as to dishonor God, 
wound his cause and people, and pierce our souls 
through with many sorrows. Our blessed Lord,oe- 
ing willing, that we should be saved from these 
sins, gives us this special command and example 
of w^atching against the tempter; as the Devil be- 
ing the enemy of God, and the destroyer of our, 
souls, Christ has overcome him by his biood, and 
brought this duty to us. Oh Brethren ! Let us be 
found in our duty, and set a watch on the tho ights 
of our hearts, and on the door of our lips, that we 
think not evil in our hearts, neither speak u ladvis- 
ably with our lips This is a duty of our Lord's 
commanding, Mark. xiv. 38, " Watch ye and pray, 
lest ye enter into temptation." Agan ia xiii, 37 
"• and what I say unto you, I say uuio lIu w iLch." 
2d. Let us watch and wait for the commg of our 
Lord, as in Matt, xxiv, 42, " W-uch therefore 
for ye know not what hour your Lord doth coine.'* 



( 8 ) 

Again the xxi, 13, " Watch, therefore, for ye know 
neither the day, nor the hour, wherein the son 
of man cometh." Further in Mark xiii, 35, 
" Watch ye therefore, for ye know not when 
the master of the house cometh at even or at mid- 
night, or at the cock crowing or in the morning," 
verse 36 "lest com ng su clenly, he find you 
slvcping." 3d " Watcli against false doctrines and 
false principles, and keep them from among you, 
and what 1 say unto you, I say unto all. Watch." 
Now, Brethren we find prayer closely annexed 
to watching It is a means of God's providing and 
a duty of Christ's commanding ; it is the means, 
by which God will be sought unto, as in the days 
of old by his people Israel and will be by his Is- 
rael now, and in days to come. Prayer is an 
interceding with God for pardoning and for- 
giving us our sins for Jesus Christ's sake. It is 
the best weapon to fight the Devil, the world, and 
the flesh. It prevails when all others will fail. 
It brings us into the valley of humility ; it is the 
channel, in which God conveys his blessings to us, 
and gives us his assisting grace, by which we are 
delivered from Temptation. Oh Brethren, let us 
be engaged in the duty of prayer. Christ taught 
his disciples to pray, as well as commanded them 
to pray, as in Luke xiv, i, "and he spake a pa- 
rable unto them to this end, that men ought al- 
ways to pray and not to faint." Prayer is an of- 
fering up of our desires to God for things lawful 
and needful, with an humble confidence to obtain 
them through the alone mediation of Christ to the 
glory of God ; we must pray constantly, ferventl}';, 
and sincerely, and with faiih and thanksgiving*- 



( 9 ) 

Oh! Brethren, let us pray fof a heart and sf)irit 
to pray ; for an increase of faith, and a growth in 
grace, to abound in good works, to love God more 
and his people better ; let us pray for the assist- 
ance of the Holy Spirit to enable us to give thanks 
for favors and mercies received, and to put our 
trust in God for supplies to come. Oh ! Brethren, 
let us be engaged in this great duty in our assem- 
blies, in our families, and in private. Do not let us 
neglect our duty to God, for he is our best Friend, 
our kindest Friend, our strongest Friend, lovingest 
and richest Friend, and coiistant Friend. From him, 
we receive all the good, we enjoy. Why then 
not obey him in his commands, seeing, it is his 
will to give us the enjoyments of this life, and the 
glorious promise of a kingdom to live and reign 
with himself forever ? Now consider, what a bless- 
ing it is to be free from temptation ! we then have 
the victory over the World, the Flesh & the Devil, 
not only so, but we enjoy Community with God 
and the sweet witness of the Holy Spirit, bear- 
ing witness with our spirits, that we are born of 
God and dwell in his h9use, under his clear go- 
vernment and protection, waiting for his coming, 
knowing, that the time of our redemption draw- 
eth nigh ; now we warn the unruly, stir up the 
luke-warm to be engaged in this duty and enjoy 
this great privilege of freedom from temptation, 
and live upon the sweet promises here, and to be 
received into the glorious kingdom of Jesus Christ 
to reign with God forever. Amen. 

n w e*u A ,• 1 JOSl PH THAMES, Moderatort 
lij.racro/thcAssocaUon.'^ SAMUEL BUXTON, C/.r/^. 

FINIS* 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



4rajje^5f ear 25apti.^t 'l^.^ociation, 

tlELD IX DUPLL^' COUXTT, 

AT NAHUNGO MEETING HOUSE, 
SATURDAY, October 2r». 1811. 

fFILMLV&l^OW, X. C, 

7^0M THE PRESS OF W. S. HASX I. £ - 

1812. 



MINUTES, he. 



1. Assembled about 10 o'clock for public wor- 
ship; Elder Job Goodman, agreeable to appoint-* 
ment, delivered an introductory Sermon from the 
1st Epistle of John^ iii chap, and 9th verse, to a large 
and attentive congregation. 

2. The Association met for business, Prayer by 
Elder Thigpen. Brother Joseph Thames, was cho- 
sen Moderator ; Brother Samuel Buxton, Clerk ; and 
James Raphael, Assistant Clerk. 

3. Brethren James Matthias and Rigby appoint* 
ed as a Committee of Fmance. 

4. Our Churches' Messengers came forward with 
their Letters and Report as follows : 



[(Q* Churches from whence no intelligence came, are marked 
thus, * — Ordained Ministers ;ire in small capitals-^ Unorfiaine«| 
Preathen m Italics.! 











'b 








-~ 




^ 


,^ 


Count res 








1 






t^ 




. 


1 




and 




^lesiien^-ers, 


«j 


^ 
1^. 


s 


•12 


1 


■g 




^.■ 


8 


Churches. 






?-< 


5J 


§ 


1 


1 


1 

o 




'S. 


1 








'•C 


Ci 


s 


cS 


^ ^.^ 


Kl 


c; 


.. < 


c? 


J. Bladen, 


~) Isaac Jessoji, 
S N'V'iiliam Strcctv. 


















JJ. c- 


Beaver Dam. 


2 


2 











1 


2 


92 


2 


Z. Kliiden, 


7 Uichard Folk, ' 
3 Ez-ekicl Nichols. 




















Big" Suamp. 











1 











32 





S. Brunswick, 


\ 




















l>cving'.sl'on.* 























00 





4. Brunswick., 


'} 




















Lockwood's FoUj 























00 





5. Columbus, 


7 .Top Goor-jfAx, 




















Seven Creeks. 


3 Edward Conner. 


2 





10 








2 


1 


78 


2 5!) 


6. Cumberland, 


7 Joseph Th-imes, 




















Cape-Fear. 


3 Charle.'? MeAUister. 


27 


1 





4 





5 


4 


252 


4, 


7. Duplin, 


7 B E i' JA M I N Da V 1 s, 

3 Lf \en Walkins. 




















Boar ^larsh-. 














1 


2 





70 


4 


8. Dupli!-!, 


7 Job Thicpex, 




















Muclciv Creek. 


3 Xuthan \\';d!er. 


9 


1 


1 








1 


3 


178 


5 


9. Dupliii, 


7 Jacob Vn'ill'tams, 




















Limestone. 


3 J^mes I'apiiacl, 


5 





2 





2 








37 


r> 


10. Duplin, 


7 James Hearden, 
5 .'■'"dward Pearsall. 




















"Nahungo. 








1 





1 


1 





31 


8 


11. Xew-Hunover^ 


7 Encck Herring-, 




















Buii-Tailj 


3 Samuel Buxton. 


13 

















1 


85 


3 58 


12. Xew-M.nover, 


"> Keul'on Everitt, 
3 P. Smiih. 




















\>'ilmington. 








1 








2 


1 


20 


1 50 


13' Onsluw, 


7 Sll.AS CArvTFR, 

5 \A ilham Eie-bv, 




















C]!;.pel Run. 


0- 

















2' 


33 


ry 


14 Onslow, 


") " 




















' Souih-Mcst. 


f Thomas Pitt. 


1 





2 





1 





5 


37 


•■) 


15. Onslow, 7 T71- t c- 
Everiit's M. House \ '^^'J^^^ Simmons, 


9 





25 








2 


2 


78 


„ 


16. Robeson, 


i Stephen Lee, 




















Ash-Pole. 








2; 


2 





3 


1 


42 


4 


17. llobtson, 
Saddle Tree. 


c Jacob Freeman. 

-^ Fleet Cooper, 
J James M;iithias. 
-> Da'd Graxtham, 
J S. Hobbs. 
^ Joi'dan Moore, 
' Jeremah Tue. 








J 
3 








2 


2 


44 


.3 


18. Sampsun, 




















Coiit.ry. 


3 


3 





6 





7 


4 


154 


3 


19. Sampson, 




















Seven Miles. 





1 





2 


ei 


2 





41 


i 50 


20. Sam.pson, 










! 










Mingx). 








^ 1 





Oi 





1 


69 


1 50 


21. AVayne, 


~\ Jc'Jit'o Oats, 




i 






1 










Thunder Swamp 


J D. Grady. 





Oi 








0l 


0! 





25 


2 50 


22. Kobeson, 


"1 Zabin Davis, 




1 








1 








Bear Swamp. 


J A^iUiam Herring-. 





01 


2 





0| 


11 





30 


2 


23. Sampson, 


"^ JoffN Tue, 


I 


1 






1 


1 








Hornet's 31. Housl 


^J Andrew Bass. 


01 


01 








0! 


Of 



27 


20 
1443" 


1 




71 1 


8| 


52 1 


151 


5'\ 


31 1 


-er-g 



^ 



C 4 ) 
b. A new constituted Church in Sampson coun- 
ty, (Hornet's Meeting' House,) sent her Messengers 
to us for admission ; was found orthodox and ccrdi- 
ally received. A report of the same is included in 
the before mentioned report. 

7. Then Visiting Brethren, from our Sister Asso- 
ciations, with others within our own hmits, being 
Brethren in the Ministry, were invited to seats among 
us, viz:. Elder White, from Charleston; Elder 
KooNCE, from Neuse ; Elder Guli.y, from Raieigh*, 
together wuh Elder Whitfield and Shearwoody 
from Virginia, and Breiliren yohnston^ Rumiicson^ 
Beesly^ and Elder Wells, who accordingly came for- 
ward and took seats with us. 

8. The Correspondent Letter was handed forward 
by Elder Whiie, from Charleston, with some copies 
of their Minutes, in token of her respect to us, to- 
getlier with a letter, by Elder Koonce, from Neuse, 
also, with some copies of her Minutes. 

9. Then ordered that the above Correspondence 
be answ^ered in the following order : — Brother i^«/?- 
dlesoji to write to Charleston Association ; brother 
M'Allester to Neuse; Elder Davis to Flat River; 
Elder Wells to Raleigh, and brother Rigby to Ke- 
hukee.- 

10. Then Elder Thigpen, who was appointed last 
year to write the Circular Letter for this year, hand- 
ed the same in ; it was read, and brethren Elder 
KooNCE and brother Rundlesoji^ appointed a com- 
mittee with Elder Thigpen, to revise said letter 



( 5 ) 

and make alterations if necessary, and report the 
same on Monday. 

1 1. Then appointed brother Ritiidleson to write the 
Circular Letter for next year, upon Justice, Mercy, 
and Family Religion. 

12- Brethren appointed to preach to-morrow, viz. 
Elder KooNCE, Elder White and Elder Goodman; 
preaching to begin at 10 o'clock. 

13. The brethren appointed to preach on Monday 
are as follows : brethren Rundieson^ S/iearwQcd, and 
Elder Thames. Elder Thames to conclude worship. 

14. Then ordered thai our next Association be 
held in Robeson county, Ash-Pole, Pitman's Meet- 
ing House, eleven miles from Lumberion, lo com- 
mence on the Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1812. Eider Thigpen requested to preach 
the ""Sermon introductory, in case of failure of brother 
Rundleson. Preaching to begin at 10 o'clock, A M. 

15. Then adjourned until Monday at 10 o'clock. 
Prayer by Elder White 

LORD'S DAT. 

The brethren appointed to preach met a large 
and extensive congregation. Elder Koonce, preach- 
ed first, from 1st Timothy, 3d chap, and 16th v. 
Then follov/ed Elder Whife, from Revelations 14th 
chap. 6th & 7th v. Then Elder Goodman, from Re- 
velations, 20ih ch. and 12th verse. Having time, 
still to spare, and an anxious and attentive congre- 
gation, Elder Thames concluded the devotions of 
the day by preaching from 11th chap. Hebrev/s and 



(6) 

16th verse, in a very warm and impressive manneiN 
and from the labours of the day we hope and trust 
that God Almighty will bring forth fruits to his Glo- 
ry, and increase to Ziort. 

^IO:<T>\\, OCTOBF.R 7, ISli. 

15. Met from adjournment, prayer by Elder Koonce. 

17. The brethren appointed to revise the Circular 
Letter handed it forward, and it was with one accord 
received. 

IS. Appointed bretliren Elder Carter and Elder 
Davis, as Delegates — Carter to Neuse Association 
and l>Avis to Raleigh Association. 

19. The brethren appointed to write the Corres- 
pondent Letters handed them in for examination, they 
were read, approved of, and signed by the Modera- 
tor and Clerk. 

20 Ordered, That brother y times Rimdlvscn write 
a Letter to the General Meeting of Correspondence. 

21. The Committee of Finance brought forward 
their Kcport, which was as follows: 

V.X Cash received from the cbifertnt Churches - S61 8 

By do. remainiisg in the Treasury froiia iast}<;ar, 3G 2 

SlOO 10 

Paid for printing last year's Minutes, - - §43 

Paid for preparing the IMiniites, - - - 20 

Paid JMessrs. Thames and Goodman, for attending 

Charleston Association, - - - 12 

Paid Elder Bknj. Davis for his services to Raleigh, 3 
Paid Elder CaUtkr for his services to Ncuse Asso- 
ciation, _ - - _ - 5 
Keiunded tliree dollars, overpaid for the Chowan 

Committee _ - - ^ 3 g36- . 



Reinains still in the Treasurv. Si 1 1& 



( r ) 

22. Brother Samuel Buxton is requested to have 
four hundred copies of these Minates printed and 
distribi^ted in the following order : to ecicli Associa- 
tion one copy for each Church of the body, and the 
remainder as usual- 

23. Then the Association adjourned, until the 
time and place before meniioned, by prayer by El- 
der White, 

" ^. ,. JOSEPH THAMES, Moderator. 

l^igneclj j^^^jVIUKL BUXTON, Ckrk, 

Circular 'Setter. 

Tlie Ministers and Messengers tliat covipose the Cape-Fecfr Baptist; 

.Association^ to the several Qlmrches they r^present^ sen(l 

Cliristian salutations. 
Dearly Belovhd Brethren, 

Through the Providential goodness of God we 
have had a comfortable Meeting, and have had fa- 
vorable accounts of the work of Grace in different 
Churches. We still hold it our duty by way of Letter 
to exhort and encourage you to stand fast in the Faith 
of God's Elect, and run in swift obedience to fulfil 
your Lord's Righteous Will and Commands. If you 
love me, says Jesus, keep my commandments ; for we 
brethren, being conceived in sin and shapen in ini- 
quity, were consequently children of wrath, even as 
others, for the language of the law is, " Cursed is 
every one that continueth not in all things written 
therein to do them'" — and the thought of foolishness 
being Sin j Sin, a transgression of the law, and lie 



CO 
that offends in one pointy is guilty of the whole taw, 
all mankind by nature being conceived in Sin, and 
therefore brought forth under the power and domin- 
ion thereof, consequently are under the law, Snd as 
inany as are under the law are under Curse, But 
Blessed be God for the unspeakable gift of his dear 
Son, from Heaven, to assume our nature, made un- 
der the law, and both in his active and passive obe- 
dience rendered a perfect satisfaction to Divine Jus- 
tice, in the room and stead of all them which the 
father had given him in covenant contract before the 
world began. Now, Brethren, we being first saved 
and then called by grace, the merits of which being 
made applicable to us by the power o^the Holy Spirit 
working faith in us, we became righteous before 
God by imputation, in as much as Christ is the end 
of the law for righteousness to all them that believe, 
and we have peace with God through our Lord ye* 
6US Christy and not only peace, but freedom, for if 
Christ hath made us free, we are free indeed ; free 
from the power and dominion of sin ; free from the 
guilt and love of sin.; free from the condemnatory- 
sentence of that righteous law that denounces not 
Temporal but Eternal death for the least failure in 
thought, word or deed ; O, the blessed state of 
God's dear children, for well might that false Prophet 
Balaam, under a discovery thereof, cry out in rap- 
turous extacy, " frho can count the rewards of the 
jRighteous^ or number a fourth part of the blessings of 
Fit tue ; let me, says he, die the death of the Righte* 
ousy, and my latter end be like his. 



( 9 ) • , 

And now Brethren you have been called' unto li- 
berty, u5e not your liberty for an occasion to the 
flesh, but by love, serve one another ; for the whole 
law is fulfilled in one word, on our part, even in this, 
thou shalt love thy Neighbour as thy self \ but if ye 
bite and devour one another^ take heed that ye be not 
consumed^ one of another. Wc therefore beseech 
you, as the elect of God, to put on, holy and belov- 
ed, bowels of mercy, kindness, humbleness of mind, 
meekness, long suffering, forbearing one another and. 
forgiving one another ; If any man have a qaarret 
against any^ even as Christ forgave^ so also do ye ; 
above all things^ put on Charity, zvhich is the bond of 
perfectness, and let the fjower of Cod rule in your 
hearts, to the ivhich also ye are called in one body, and 
be ye tJiankful, Coll III Chap, verse li?, 13, 14, 15, 
for he that hath called you, hath also loved you with 
an everlasting love, therefore ivalk inorthy of the vo- 
cation ; And for your farther comfort and instruction, 
we shall now proceed to shew from the Up and word 
of divine truth, the stability of the covenant of Grace, 
and shew the mistaken notions of some that would 
wish to discard i!he doctrine of Election-, and make 
attempts to ^ay that the Scriptures contradict them- 
selves, and vainly suppose that a dear child of God 
may fall from grace and be finally lost, after all their 
High Priest has done and suffered for them. Read 
in Isaiah, XLIII chapt. /, even /,. am he that blot- 
tefh out tliy transgressions for mine sahe, and will not 
remember thy sins ; again in chap. LI V, 9 — for this 
i> as the waters of Noah unto me^for as I have sworn 



• (10) 

ifuit the rvalerfi of Ncali .sliall no more p;o over tlie earthy so have • 
iivcrn that IxvUlnot be xirath tvith thee^ nor rtbuke thee ^ for tl?e 
mountains shall depart and the lulls 'he removed^ but nn; kindness 
shall not depart from thee., neither fihall the covenant of nu^ peace be 
removed^ saytth the Lord that liath mercy on thee. Jesus sayeth, 
7ny Sheep hear my voice, and I know theviy and thctf folloxv me\ and 
I give zinio them eternal life., and they shall never perish: neither 
khall any phick them out oj my hand., for my Father ivhich gave 
them n:e, is greater than alL and none is able to pluck them out of 
vry Father''s hand.^-Ag-An read in Romans viii. chap. 38, & 29 v. 
Vvhat that gi-eat Apostle of the Gertiks sayeth^ uhy savs he, J atn 
persuaded that neither death nor. life, nor Angels, nor principalities^ 
ncr powers., nor things present, nor ihiiigs to come, nor heighth^ 
nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us Jroni 
the love of God, xvhich is tn Christ fesus ^ur Lord. Theielbre 
Brethren, be not carried away with every wind of doctrine by the 
slight of men and cunning craftiness ivherehy theij lie in xvait to de- 
ceive. Eut search the scriptures diligently ; make them the man 
of N'our council ; grow in Grace and in the knowledge of our Lord 
and Saviour fesus Christ ; for if ye love and fear God, ye. have 
nothing else to fear; but after a ten days tribulation in the state 
of trial, ye shall come forth as gold xvcll refned, be received to 
the mansions of eternal rest and felicity', where you will see voiir 
Saviour without a glass, between faith be lost in sight, and hope 
in full fruition die, and 3'ou immediately join the ^/&r7^ef/;r;7//;&n.* 
in singing sublime anthems and everlasting praises to God and the 
Latib forever and ever. And mav the Lord of his infinite mercy 
grant this to be all our happy lots, for Christ's sake. Amen.~ 

By order of the Association, 

•,e. ,s ]OSEf>H THAMES, 3Joderator. 

(^bigned; SAMUEL BUXTON, Clerk. 



ERRATUM— In page 8, in the eighth line from the bottom, before the word 
Temporal,- read, only. 



MINUTES 



CAPE-FEAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

HELD IN ROBESON COUNTY, 
AT PITMAN'S MEETING-HOUSE, 

October 3, 1812. 



ASSEMBLED about ten o'clock for public worship. EIdej« 
James Ranaldson delivered the Sermon introductory, from 
2ci Corinthians, 5th chap, 20th verse, to a large and attentive as- 
sembly. 

2. The Association met for business. Prayer by Elder Wells, 
Then chose brother Joseph Thames, Moderator, and Samuel 
Buxton, Clerk. 

3. Then were appointed brethren yacob Williams and yethra 
Oats^ as a committee of finance, to receive the contributions, make 
settlements, and report the same. 

4. Then being present, visiting brethren in the Ministry, they 
were invited to seats among us, who came forward accordingly ; 
among whom, were Elders White ana Reaves, from Charlestoa 
Association ; Elders Thames and RanaldsoiM, from Cape-Fear ; 
and brethren Nutt and Hodge. 

5. Then received reports from twenty-three Churches, by letter 
and delegates, an account of which is hereunto annexed. 

6. Then received a correspondent letter from Charleston Asso* 
elation, by the hands of her delegate Elder White, with some co- 
pies of her minutes, as a token of her love to us ; together with 
letters from Neuse and Raleigh Associations, with some copies of 
their minutes, which were answered in the following order ;— 
Elder James Ranaldson was appointed a delegate to Charleston 
Association, to write the letter and forward some copies of our 
minutes to them ; brethren Elder Thames and Joseph Thames, 
delegates to Ruieigh Association ; Elder Wells, to Neuse As- 



C2 ) 

sociation, to write the letter and forward some copies of our mi» 
nutcs to them; and brothtr Chafles McAllister to write to Flat 
River Association. - 

7. Elder Ranaldson, who was appointed to write the Circular 
Letter for this year, through some disappointment, has not handed 
it forward : it is therefore agreed that Elder Ranaldson still pur* 
sue the preparing said letter, and that brethren Elder Wells, 
IVilliams and Buxton^ be a committee upon said letter, to make al- 
terations, if need be, and commit it to the press. 

8. Ordered, that brother Jacob IViUiams be appointed to pre- 
pare the Circular Letter for next year. 

9. Ordered, that brother S. Buxton prepare thete minutes for 
the press ; have four hundred printed, and then distribute as usu- 
al, each Church to apply in Wilmington for their quota ; he the 
said S. Buxton first packing and directing the same at office. 

10. Then agreed that our next Association be holden at Thuii* 
der Szvcvnp Meeting-House^ in Wayne county, to commence on, 
Saturday before the first Lord's Buy in October, 1313. Service 
to begin at 10 o'clock. 

11. Elder William Wells is appointed to preach the intro- 
ductory Seimon ; and in case of failure. Elder Ezekiel Bryant. 

12. The committee of finance came forward v/ith their report, 
which was approved, and is as follov/s: 

Received this year from twenty-three Churches, 1^68 95 

Remaining in the. treasury from last year, » - 11 10 



.80 9. 



Paid for printing last year's Minutes, - $14- 

Clerk's allowances lor service done, - - 14 

Elder Carter's services to Neuse Association, 2 

Eider Davis's services to Raleigh Association, 4 

g34 0(5 

Remaining in tiie treasury for this year, - - g46 5 

13. Then appointed brethren to preach tc-morrov*' ; of whont 
v/ere Elders White, Goodman, Ranaldson and Thames. Ser-- 
vice to begin at 10 o'clock, and close at half past three. 

14. Tlien adjourned in order, until Monday 10 o'clock.— Prayer 
hy Elder White. ^ 



C 3 ) 

LORD'S DAT, 

■ The brethren appointed to preach to-day, attended, and met & 
very large audience, who appeared orderly and aitentive. Elder 
Goodman, first on the stage, preached from the 3d chap, of St. 
John, and 7th verse. Ranalidson, who fcUowed him, preached 
from the 45th chap, of Isainh, 22d v. White next p>-eached from 
the oth chap, of the Songs o^" Solomon, ISth v. Thames then 
followed hiio, and preached from St. John, 21st chnp. 15th & 16th 
verses. — The day was very favorable, and time tnougl? ior further 
duties. Elder Reaves concluded the duties of the day by ex- 
hortation. The speakers delivered their discourses with an un- 
common zeal, which we trust reached the hearts of many, and 
which we hope will be to the glory of God and the increase of 
Zion's family. 

Monday^ October 5, 1812. 

15. Met agreeable to adjournment — Prayer by Elder Bryant. 

16. The brethren appointed to write the corresponding letters* 
handed them foivvard, which were read and appiovtd of, and sign- 
ed b}' the- Moderator and Clerk. 

17. Ordered, that bi-ethren Elders Goodman, Carter, Bry- 
ant,. Pit'im an and Robbins^ be a committee of enqui»-)' upon the 
petitionary letter of the Saddle-Tree Church, to act thereon as 
may seem right to them or a majority of them, and make report 
thereof to the next annual association. 

18. Elder William Thames, agreeable to appointment, clos- 
ed the Association by a very warm discourse, from 2d Corinthi- 
ans, last chap. 11th verse. 

19. The Association then adjourned to the time and place be- 
fore mentioned. Prayer by Elder White. 

Signed JOSEPH THAMES, Moderator, 

S. BUXTON, Clerk. 



^^ Ordained Ministers are in small capitals — Licensed 
Preachers in Italics— Ministers not present, thus =^^ ' 



REPORT of the CHURCHES. 



Counties 










^5 






f 


S* 


and 

Churches. 


MSSSSKCBIIS. 


•a 

1j 




«. 


1 








•0 






?^ 


1 


'r 


"1 


5) 
H 


'2 


*£, 


1 






f^ 


^■' 


^ 


■^ 


^^ 


c; 


iCr 





1. Bladen, 7 WiUlam Kewp, 
Heaver-Dam. 3 Edward Harris. 














\j). G 







4 


2 











92 


3 


2. Biaden, 7 Joseph Griffin, 
Big Swamp. 3 -Tesse Foli. 






























1 





33 


3 


3. Brunswick, 5 Ezekiel Bryant 
Livingston. 3 Michael Ward. 


















13 





27 





3 


] 


68 


1 St 


4. Brunswick, , ") .ibsolem Uobivs, 
Lockwood Folly. 3 Sherwood Folk. 





















11 











1 


27 


2 


5. Columbus, i Job Goodman, 
Seven Creeks. ^ ^t\\\vo Kobins. 


















8 














2 


83 


3 


6. Cumberland, 7 Joseph Thames, 
Cape-Fear. 3 (-'harles M'AlUster. 


















19 


3 


5 





5 


6 


257 


s 


f. Duplin, \ Timothy Spence* 
Bear Marsh. 3 Joh.ii Ingram. 


















5 





310 





2 


70' 5 


8. Dupiin-M. Creek 1 Walter Da fen'' 


2 


1 


1 1 


2 


3 


182 


7 


9. Duplin,Lm^e!:.toBe | Jacob Williams, 


2 





1 


4 


1 


33 


2 50 


JO. Duplin, 7 William Waterman, 
Nahoiigo. 3 Benjamin Bess. 


















1 

















32 


3 


11. New-Hanover, 7 William Wells, 
Bull-Tale. > S. Buxton. 


















5 











1 


2 


86 


5 20 


12. New-Hanover. 7 , ,^ 
Wilmington. 3 


6 


1 


1 











23 


2 


13. Onslow, 7 Sjlas Carter, 
Chapel Run. 3 W'illianis Cox. 


















3 

















37 


3 5« 


14. Onslow, S.West | John Langley. 














« 


2 


40 


2 


Everitt's M.House.3 


5 





1 








3 


81 


3 


16. Robeson, 7 Isham Pitmam, 


















Aslipole. 3 Philip Spears. 


1 





1 


2 


1 


2 


42 


3 


17. Robeson, 7 Charles Pate, 
Saddle-tree. 3 William Hesters. 














1 




2 








21 








30 3 


18. Sampson, i John Carrel,* 
Coliary. J John Stepiiens. 


































156 3 


19. Sampson, ^ D'd GRA^'THAM, 
Seven xMiles. J Alexander Benton. 














1 


4 

















47; 1 7i 


20. Sampson, 'I Sherwood Holly,* 
Miiigo. J Jolin King. 














! 


2 


4 








3 





64 1 50 


31. Wayne, ~j Solomon Rouse, 
















Thunder Swamp J Jethro Oats. 


19 











1 





40 4 


22. Robeson, "A Lewis Thompson, 
Bear Swamp. J Zabin Davis. 

































2 


28 


2 


3o. Sampson. "\ Andrew Bass, 
Hernet's M. House*J Leven Jackson. 


















1 

lis 


5 

29 


1 






21 


1 
32 


26 


1 




33 37 


1627 


m OS 



(3 ) 



CIRC ULA n LE TTER. 

THE Cape-Fear Baptist A:iSOGiATioN, assembled at Pitman's 
man's Meeting-House, Robeson county, October Sd, 1812, to 
the Ckurches they represent, send Christian salutation. 

Beloved Brethren—' 

Agreeably to a resolve, passed at our last session, we now ad- 
dress )'ou on the important duties of Jiistice^ Mercy ^ and Family 
Religion. 

While it is remembered, that it is ouv rale and custom in writ- 
ing circular addresses, strictly to avoid lengthy discussions, and 
aim at the utmost precision, it cannot be expected that we, in the 
present address, shall give that minute investigation and ample 
elucidation of the subject, which it really merits. We can do little 
more than put you in remembrance of duty, and admonish you to 
the regular performance of those sai:red duties^ designated as the 
theme of the present discourse. 

What hath the Almighty required of us, but " to do justly^ to 
love mercij^ and to xvalk humbly with himr" This requisition cannot 
be thought grievous to disciples who love their Lord, as a com- 
pliance adds dignit}'^ to their nature, affords joy and peace to their 
consciences, and produces happiness and tranquility among the ra- 
tional creatures of God. 

That sense of justice we wish to admonish you to observe, is 
that political virtue which renders to every man his due, and is to 
be considered either distributive as it concerns magistrates, or 
those in judicial authority ; or commutative, as it regards all per- 
sons in their private or public dealings, one with another. It is not 
always sufficient to justify the man of God, to say his neighbor can 
take no adviwitage of him by the civil or judicial law, or that he 
has actually escaped punitive justice by artfully evading the penal- 
ty of the law: but the Christian is expected to act agreeably to his 
credenda — -strive for the answer of a good conscience before God, 
as well as in the sight of man — "do to others as he v/ould they 
should do to him" in similar circumstances. And now, if all men 
acted upon these benevolent principles of the gospel, where would 
be the coniplaint of extortion and fraudulency .'' Or rather, why is 
" the hire of the labourers, who have reapecl down our fields, kept 
feack horn them, and their cries enter into the cars of the Lord of 



Sabaotb? While some are heaprngup treasure for the last clays, 
living in pleasure and are waiiton, — have nourished their hearts 
as in a day of slaughter, — others have toiled and laboured in the 
shackles of cruelty and hardship, without a comfortable hut to lie 
in, not a sufficiency of wholesome food to sustain them, and not 
enough of tattered garmenis to hide their nakedness or keep out 
the cold zephyr — Yet these are the peoj^ie that perform lirduous 
tasks for the support of others. Can these things be among Chris- 
tians ? Alas, ihcy are seei\.in some parts of Christendom ! — Well 
might an oriental sage, in his pro})hetic views, exclaim, '"■ '/i/d^'e-^ 
ment is turr.ed axvay backwards^ and justice standeth afar off ; truth 
is Jallen in the streets^ and equity cannot enter ^'' 

The duty of Mercy, to be observed and exercised by us, is 
that pity and compassion we owe to the miserable, or those duties 
of charity we owe to our neighbors. Mercij and love are some- 
what synonymous ; yet it is possible for us to exercise love with- 
out mercy. We may love them that love us, and still forget "to 
love mercy" towards the guikv, the indigent and the miserable. 
Mercy and love should be distinguished thus: The object of love 
3s the creature simply J the object of mercy is the creature fallea 
into misery. A genuine faith that works by love, embraces each 
of these objects. — We, as the posterity of Adam, are all objects of 
mercy in one degree or another ; therefore the mutual exercise of 
it towards each other, is essential to preserve the harmony and ' 
happiness of societ)^ At once, then, v/e discover the importance 
of this duty, to be exercised more particularly towards the guiltyy 
the indigent^ and the miserable. As it respects the guilty, we 
should endeavor to reclaim them, and .save them from the perni- 
cious consequences of their bad conduct, while we shew clemency 
in not punishing beyond the desert of the crime — "For he shall 
have judgment without mercy that hath shewed no mercy,'''' With 
regard to the poor and indigent, these are the objects of our bene- 
faction ; and as stewards of the manifold grace of God, we should 
dispense the goods put into our hands for their supplies, in pro- 
portion to Qur circumstances and ^/;«> exigejicy. "He that hath 
pity upon the poor, lendeth unto the Lord ; and that which he 
hath given, will he pay him again, for God loveth a cheerful giver: 
But whoso hath this world's goods, and seeth his brother have 
need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion irom him, how 
dvyelleth the love of God in him r" As to those who are in mi- 
sery or distress, they are peculiarly the objects of commiseration, 
and mercy would prompt us to meliorate their condition, if possi' 



ble, and alleviate their distresses. The benevolent Jesus recom- 
mends this act of mercy in the most striking and pathetic manner, 
by the parable of the man who ft 11 among thieves^ and was reliev- 
, ed Ly the poor Samaritan : and in the conclusion he adds "Go. and 
do thou likewise''' — Luke 10, 30 — 57. The exercise of mercy is 
not confined to our own acquaintances and connections only, but 
extends to ail the human species, and even to all animal creation. 
*'A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast." 

These fcw remarks on justice and mercy may suffice. As it 
must be obvious to evtr}^ judicious, thinking mind, that our social 
and temporal felicity depends on the mutual observance of these 
duties ; and when viewed as the stern mandate of Heaven's King, 
to " do justly and love mercy," who can have the glaring presump- 
tion to disobey the injunction, or disregard these solemn duties ? 
If ye, brethren, know these things, hr.ppy are ye if ye do them. 

Wc- she'll nov/ conclude our circular address, with a few cursory 
remarks on Family Devotion — For ifv/e attempt to do this sub- 
ject any ki'>d oi justice, it will protract our letter to too great pro- 
lixity.— Nothing decorates the Christian so much as a "meek and 
quiet spirit," or that of v.aiking humbly w ith God in a self-denied 
life. This is to be done in families as well as in secret and public. 
We trust diere is no occasion to prove that it is your duty to wor- 
ship God in your families ; and we hope that the exemplarv con- 
duct of the ancient servants of God, is sufficient to stimulate you 
in this sacred, important duty. Besides, you are exhorted 
throughout the scriptures, to bring up your children (and may we 
not say your servants too?) in the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord. But notwithstanding the many pious examples exhibited 
to our view, and the many warm exhortations addressed to our 
ears, still there is too much cause, dear brethren, to regret the 
coldness, negligence, anci total remissness in family worship. We 
are but too justly vilified for falling into the laodicean spirit, and 
even into antinomian practices, by a neglect of the means of grace. 
Perhaps, instead of speaking of the law of God before your children 
and servants, evening and morning, when you lie down and when 
you rise up, when you walk by the way side, and v/hen you sir in 
your house, your conversation is carnal, eartlily, sensual, devilish — . 
instead of keeping the sabbath day holy, when there is no preach- 
ing conrenitnt, you spend the day in formal visits, or in performing 
some journey or servile work to save another day. — Brethren, re- 
flect seriously on the pernicious consequences of neglecting familv 
religion. Does it net bring guilt and shame on j^ouraeives — 



harden your cliilclren in vice, and you liave reason to fear it tnay 
contribute to the eternal ruin of their precious, immortal souls ! 
Oh consider that the trust reposed in you as parents, is awful in- 
dited ! You stand in a relation to yom- families, similar to that of 
a pastor to a church. You watch for souls as they that must give 
account ; and what if your children's and servant's blood should be 
required at your hands ! With affectionate importunity, we soUcit 
you, beloved brethren, to give a diligent attendance to ail those 
duties, and especially to form Joshua's resolution ; worship God in 
your houses, that Jesus, upon his second coming, may find you so 
doing, and give the excellent plaudit, *^' well done good and faith- 
ful servants i" 

We trust the Lord has been with us in our meeting ; has given 
an increase of brotherly affection among ourselves ; and, from the 
unusual solemnity and decorous behaviour of a crowded assembly 
for three days, we indulge a sanguine hope» that our ineeting has 
tended to the furtherance of the gospel. We now commend youi 
to God and the word of his grace, wishing you the best of bless« 
ings, while we remain yours affectionately in gospel bonds. 



Printed at the office of W.S.Hasell, Wilmington. 
1812. 



•■ MINUTES 

OF THE 

Cape-Fear Baptist Association f 

HELU IN WAYNE COUNTY, 
^T THl/KDRR'SW^MP MEETIJ^TG-HOWSS, 

Saturday, October 2, 1813, 

A ASSEMBLED about 10 o'clock for public Worship ^ 

^' A l^:ider Wells, agreeable to appointment, aehvered 
the Introductory Ser^non to a large audience, from the 20th 

'^2!'TL''Ai;c^on'convened for business ; prayer was mado 

"^^^L^:^ the Messengers from tv.enty-one Church., 
wer'e then called and .uroiied. A stateoxent of the same rs here- 

n! T^htnlose brother Joseph Thames, moderator at.d bro- 

^? "c^'et^n* WilUams Cox and James Matthla.^ 
as a Committee of Finance, to receive the contributions and 

make settlements and report. ;„„:.^J *n s*ats with 

6 Then visiting brethren present, were invited to seats wub 
us ;monAvho- lere Elder Bibdlk from Nruse Associanon, 
Eld^KoBERT T. Daniel, from Raleigh, also Elder Ran- 
rll Dso^'aU of whom ca>ne forward and partook among v^. 

"TxSn received the following -^f ^^^S-- f^TiXV'^ tj 
^ ' *;^«o ^Ay fvo-n Charleston Association, a letter wun 
Associations, viz. *^^^^ ^J^;^'^^ ^^^^-^^ Association a letter 
some copies ot her m)nates , iroio ^^'""='6 nelr T^tc 

and some copies of her .n.nutes, by 4= hands %''=■• Oe't,^" 
Flder DiHiEL, as a tokeu oi their love to us.— 1 he same to oe 

Ss^erld rn'he foilowi.g order : El.<»" /-^.""^^^^ilr Da'- 
tate to Charleston Association, to write the let er. f-"" "^ , 
I" to Ealeigh and Nease Associations, to «nt= and beat th. | 

''Tihe Cirouhr Letter for this y=^ «»' *™ "^^'^jafiSI 
vhich vvts handed forward and read, then handed to EldeJ 
B^nJand »A:«.t, and brother M'Ailester, a. a comm.ttca 

-rtrd*=sr^:-:"ttr:rtSl Vted to write .be 
"^r'Thtj: -:;p'orrdt,tro^oor«rR-t..,..nsoK and] 

d1v.s, as a Smmistec t, «.«nias our corresiioBdin^ Minutes 
«»«! report thcretr®m» 



( 2) 

11. Ordered, that eur next Association be held b 15uplm 
county, at Muddy Creek meering house, to commence ou the 
Saturday before the first Sunday in October l814 ; service tT]t 
begin at 10 o'clock. 

12. Elder GooDMAwisr'equested ^o preach the Introductory 
Sermon, in case of failure Elder Gorntc!). 

13. Ther appointed Elder Ra-nnaldsov to preach the Valei» 
iictory Sermon to this Association, on Monday next. 

14. Then appointed Elders Daniel, Biddle and RakwahJ* 
SON, to preach to-morrow j servrpe to begin at 10 o'clock. 

15. Then adjourned in order until Monday 10 o'clock.^-' 
Prayer by Elder Rannaldson. 



Lord's Day. 

THE Brethren appointed to preach to-day met a very large 
and extensive assembly ; Elder Biddle first upon the stage, 
preached from the 4th chapter of Ephesians and 3d verse;— 
Rannaldson then followed him next on the stage, preached 
from the lxxxix psalm and 15th verse ; Dakiel then next 
and last on tha stage, who concluded the labors of the day, 
preached from the viii chapter of Romans and 33d verse, all of 
tvlrom spoke, (as we think) from the spirit of Almighty God, 
^hich appeared to reach the hearts of many of their audience^ 
and which we hope will redound to the Glory of God and th? 
^crease of Zion's family. 



Monday, 10 o'clock. 

Met pursuant to adjournment, prayer by Elder RAtfNALDson. 

16. The Committee appointed to inspect tiie Minutes of the 
various Associations, report, That this body unite with vari- 
ous sister Associations in the United States, in warning their 
Churches, &c. 

IT, Then the Committee appointed to revise the Circular 
Letter handed it forward, approved of. 

18. Next the Committee from last year, to Saddle Tree 
Church, reported that they attended agreeable to order and 
found said Church in order. 

19. Then the Brethren appointed to write the correspotidlng 
letters handed them in, they were read, approved of, and signed 
tjy the Moderator and Clerk. 

20. This Association recommend to all the Baptist Churches 
•which compose their body, to set apart the first Sabbath ic jul^r 



(a) 

next as a day of FASTING and PRAYER to Almighty God. 
21. Then the Committee of Finances came forward with 
their Report which was as follows : 

Received this year from 21 Churches - S 50 00 

Remaining in the Treasury from last year - 46 05 

Paid for printing the Minutes, - Sl4 00 
Paid the Clerk for his services - 14 00 

Paid Elder Rannaldson for his services 9 OO 
Paid Elder Wells for his services - 4 00 

- — 841 00 



Remains in the Treasury, - - - S 55 05 

22. Then ordered that the Clerk have four hundred copies 
of these Minutes printed and deposited at Raleigh, time enough 
for the members of the General Assembly to convey to each 
Church their quota, the same to be wrapped and directed as 
heretofore, 

23. Then adjourned to the time and place before mentioned*. 
Prayer by Elder Biddle. 

.e- n JOSEPH THAMES, ModeratofM. , 

i^aignea; SAMTEL BUXTON, Ckrk, 

Then Elder Rasnaldson who was appointed to preach the 
Valedictory Sermon, mounted on the «tage and preached from 
ii Corinthians, vi chapter and 7th verse, who delivered a very 
pathetic discourse, which we hope will make lasting impraasioiiS 
to the Glory of God. Amen> 



REPORT OF THE CHURCHES. 



Counties 
and 

ClIVBCUES. 



Ministers 
and 

MtSSENOERS. 



1. Tlladen, 

Beaver Dam. 

2. Bladen, 

Big Swamp. 

3. Brunswick, 

Livingston. 

4. Brunswick, 
Lockwood's Folly. 

5. Columbus, 

Seven Creeks. 

6. Cumberland, 

Cape-Fear. 

7. Duplin, 
Bear Marsh. 

8. Duplin, 
Muddy Creek. 

2. Duplin, 

Limestone. 

10. Duplin, 

Nahungo. 

11. New. Hanover, 

Bull-Tale. 

12. New-Hanover, 
Wilmington. 

13.. Onslow, 

Chapel Run. 

14. Onsluw, 
South-West 

15. Onslow, 
Everitf s M. House 

16. Robeson, 

Ash Pole. 

17. Robeson, 

Saddle Tree. 
28. Sampson, 
Cobary. 
19, Sampson, 

Seven Miles. 
^. Sampson, 
Mingo. 

51. Sampson, 
Hornet's M. House. 

52. Robeson, 
Bear Swamp. 

^. Wayne, 
Thunder Swanjip. 



7 Edward Harriss, 
3 John Cooper.* 
7 Elias Nichuls, 
5 Dennis Lenon.* 



WoB Goodman". 

7 Joseph Thames, 
5 Charles M'AUister.* 

} Benjamin Davis 
John Inj.^ram. 
■) Job Thigpen, 
5 Nathan Waller. 
7 James Rapbield, 
5 Richard Swinson.* 
7 James Reardeji, 
5 John Thomas. 
7 William Wells 
5 Samuel Biixlon. 

7 John Larkins, 
3 John Everltt. 

i Silas Cauter, 

\ Williams Cos. 

> Jesse Webb, 

J Thomas Pitt.* 

> John Gornto, 
( Daniel Nixon. 

? William Ward, 
S John Barns. 

i Jacob Freeman. 

) James Matthias, 
S John Stephens. 
? Davtd Grantham 
1 Alexander Benton. 

> Sherod Holly, 

J Joi-dan Moore.* 
J Ervin Jackson, 
J JoHtT Tree. 
} Hardy Pitman^ 
$ B. Watson.* 
7 Jethro Oats, 

5 Joto Jcnes.* 



u 



16 



95 



2^i45;S8l6 



^. 5 



S3 
2 



35 
77 
SS 

S9: 

i 

140 

43 

63 
23 
34 
56 



a. 



82 1 50! 

225 4 

95 S 

ITS S 

30 1 50 

31 3 
84 3 
23 2 
35 1 50 



2 
3 
2 
2 
3 

2 50 
X 50 
1 

2 

3 50 



§5 
fc.a 



tf. V 
C..6KE 

c.S 



'^'S 
^ p 



28[l348i>>50 00 



en 
Circular Estttr. 

The Ministers and Messengers of the Cape-Fear 
Baptist Association^ convened at Thunder-Swamp 
Meeting House^ (IVayne county^ N. Carolina) to 
the several Churches they represent, send greeting :^ 

DEAR BRETHREK, 

Being highly favored of our Merciful High Priest and 
privileged with another annual interview, we still hold it our 
duty by way ot letter to remind you of, and endeavor to encou- 
rage and excite you to perseverance and diligence in those du- 
ties incumbent on us and contained in the sacred pages, and one 
of the many which we would call your attention to at the present 
is that important passage by our Lord, contained in the Gospel 
by John, chap 5, v. 39. *' Search the Scriptures." Among the 
many arguments which might be adduced as a stimulative to 
diligence in the exercise of this duty perhaps none are more im- 
portant than those urged by our Lord subsequent to the subject 
under consideration, for in them, viz. (the Scriptures) " you 
think you have eternallife and they are they that testify of me," 
and ia connection also is the language of St. Paul, which says 
they arc able to make wise unto salvation, not only as they re- 
Veai a Saviour as the appointed glorious medium, whereby any 
of the fallen race of Adam, through the agency of the Divine 
Spirit are brought from darkness to light and made partakt rs of 
God's holy nature here and will be eternally happlSed with him 
in a better world ; but also the scriptures make a complete sys- 
tem and infallible guide for faith and practice for all God's 
children, both in precept and example, as also one of the ap- 
pointed means for communion with our Heavenly Father, 
growth in grace and the establishment of God's Elect j and dear 
brethren, seeing we may with propriety be said to be tossed oa 
a tempestuous ocean, while in our pilgrimage state by the world, 
Sesh and satau, exposed to inumerable trials, temptations and 
snares, O be diligent in the exercise of this duty ! Cultivate by 
Searching the scriptures, a perpetual acquaintance with the Di- 
vine mind, and be not forgetful hearers but doers of the word ; 
tre are informed by the inepired penman that there were false 
prophets among the people even as there shall be false teachers 
among you : And our Lord adds, that many false Christs and 
Prophets shall arise and deceive if it were possible, the very 
Elect, and have we not abundant cause to believe the above pre- 
dictions are already fulfilled among us, then hovr important the 
injunction to search the Scripti fes and view their complexio* 
ifn 6he saered miiror of eternal truth, bring them t© the law and 



e 6 > 

«o the testimotiy, for if any man speak not according to thi$ 
word it is because there is no light in him. Beware lest any 
Jnan spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit after the fudi* 
snents of the world and net after Christ — Search the Scriptures, 
make them the man of your counsel — meditate on them conti* 
Uually i O the necessity and the utility of searching the Scrip- 
lures ; are you a minister of Christ and called to feed the flock 
of God—here your duty is marked out in fair lines ; #re you 
private members, here you may behold your duties as it res- 
pects your Heavenly master and one another, it is here that pa- 
rents and children, husbands and wives, servants and masters 
hi their different situations in life, may be informed of the will 
of God respecting their life and conduct, faith and practice j 
Then Dear Brethren, suffer us once more to repeat the admo- 
nition, " search the Scriptures," plead with God to eniighter.. 
your minds in the understanding thereof, be diligent in all your 
great concerns with Him, who, you hope, has called you out of 
darkness into his marvellous light — So shall your spiritual joys 
increase, which is better than mines of gold, your life be peace- 
ful and death triumphant. And now Dear Brethren wp commit 
you to God and the word of his Grace : and now to the King 
eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wiee God, be honor and 
glory both now and ever. Amen. 

JOSEPH THAMES, 3Ioderator. 

SAMUEL BUXTON, Ckrk. 



On the death of our beloved Elder Thames, 

FROM THE ASSOCIATION. 

Ere yet the morn its lovely blushes spread^ 
See^ Thames lies numbered xmth the happy dead; 
He is gone ta the blessed mansions in eternal day—^ 
Jy Thames dead^ our tremblivg tongues reply^ 
C, what a blessing by Heav'n is deny'd t 
How oft for us this Prophet pray'' d^ 
How oft to us the word of Lfe conveyed ; 
Mourn for him you Indigent whom he has fed^ 
And henceforth seek like him for Uvlng bread ; 
Mourn for him you tjoung^ to Xvhom he oft has tol$ 
God's gracious wonders from ti?nes of old. 
We hear no more the mui.ick of his tongue^ 
His wonted auditors now cease to tiirongi 
Unhappy we the setting sun deplore^ 
Who iS gone to r.^turn to us no more., 
i^ho eft among us fed the wretched p^sr 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Cape-Fear 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

CONVENED AT 

MUDDT CREEK 
MEETING HOUSE, 

On SATURDAY thb 1st OCTOBEK, M14 

FAYETTEVJLLEs 
PRINTED BY .> F. BOWELr. 

18 1 4- 



MINUTES, &c. 
Saturday^ October 1st. 1814.. 

•1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered 
at 11 o'clock, A.M. by Elder Goodman, from 
Cul. iii. 3. 4. 

2. Elder Robins prayed at the opening of the 
business. Letters from 24 Churches were then 
read, an account taken of their state, and the 
ftames of the Delegates they had sent minuted. 

3. Elected Brother Joseph 1 hames, Modcra- 
tor, and Elder J^mes A. Kanaldson, Clerk. 

4. Keceived and read letters from Correspond- 
ing Associations; vii. From the Charleston, no 
corilmunications — From the Neuse, a Letter and 
Minutes — From the Raleigh, Minutes of the last 
and preceding years—s-From the Flat River, a 
Letter. • 

5. Two newly constituted Churches; viz.— 
Beulah, and Reyley's creek, applied lor admis* 
sion into this Association, and were cordially re* 
ceived. 

6. The Circular Letter, written by Brother 
Ranaldson, was produced and received. 

r. A printed letter from the Rev. Luther Rice, 
a Missionary lately from India, was presented by 
Brother Ranaldson to this Association ; and be- 
ing read was received wiih approbation : Also 
fiome Minutes of the Baptist Convention, for 
I'ilissionary purposes, held in the City of Phila- 
delphia last May, were gratefully received. 

8. The ministering Brethren present, were in- 
vited to a scat with the Association. 

9. Appointed 



( 3 ) 

9. Appointed our Brethren Barnes and Ilobbs, 
k Committee of Finance. 

10. Brethren Goodman and Wells, are appoint* 
«d to examine the Letters & Minutes of Corres- 
ponding Associations, with a view to this body's 
taking under consideration, any articles of gene- 
ral concern to the interest of religion, in which it 
may be convenient and proper for them to act in 
concert with their Brethren of other Churches. 

11. Appointed our Brethren Ranaldson and 
Williams to write to Corresponding Associations: 
viz. Ranaldson^ to the Charleston, the Raleigh, 
and the Flat River j— Williams to the Neuse. 
Also appointed Brother Davis, a Messenger to 
the Charleston ; and Brother Williams, a Mes» 
senjger to the Neuse. 

12. Brother GoodiTi^.n, is requested to write 
the next Circular, and is at liberty to select hi* 
subject. 

13. Appointed Brother Ranaldson to write a 
letter, to send with a copy of these INIinutes, to 
the Corresponding Secretary ol the Baptist Board 
for Foreign Missions. 

14. Appointed Elder Goodman, Ranaldson and 
Wells, to preach to-morrow-^worship to begin at 
10 oVlork. 

Brother Goodman prayed, and the Association 
adjourned till Monday 10 o'clock. 

Three Sermons were delivered on the Sabbath 
to a solemn and attentive audience. Goodman 

preached from Ezek, xxxvii, 10 Ranaldson 

from Isa. xxi, II, 12 — Wtlh from Heb. ii, 5. 

A collection was made for evangelical Mis 
sions, to be transmitted to the Norih.Caroliojj 
Baptist Association for Foreign Missions. 

Met according to adjournment.— -^Brother 
Thigpen prayed. 

15. The Committee of Finance reported as 
follows, viz. Received 



C 4 ) 

Received this Year from 24 1 
Churches, J 

Reraaining in the Treasury! ^^ ^^ 

from last Year, j 



52 17 1 i: 



Paid for printing last Year's 1 .^ /^^ 
Minutes^ J ^* "" 

To Brother Ranaldson, a^ 

Blessenger to the Char- ^ 6 00 
leston Association, ^ 

To Brether Davis, a Mas- , 

fiengerto the Kalcigh and ^ 8 00 
Neusc Associations, ^ 



107 22 12 



■UB 



Remainio J- in the Treasury, ^79 22 1 3 

16. The Committee appointed to examine the 
Letters and Minutes of Corresponding Associa* 
tions, r.'^ported— That nothing in them appeared 
to require the special notice of this body. 

17. Appointed th; first Thursday in July ncx% 
as a day of Humiliation, Fasting and Prayer, to 
be observed by ail our Churches, to deprecate the 
displeasure of Almighty God, and to implore his 
mercy and blessing on our land and nation, and 
on all the Churches of his Saints ; and to pray for 
t!\e success of Missionary efforts, and for a gene* 
ral revival of religion. 

18. Agreed that our n^xt meeting be held at 
Beulah, Sampson county, on ths Saturday, be- 
fore the first Lord's day in October next. 

Elder Gorato, to preach the introductory Ser- 
mon ; in case of failure, Elder Thigpen. 

Concluded with prayer by Elder Wells. 

The valedictory discourse was delivered by Ei- 
der Goodman. 

STATE 



STATE of the CHURCHES. 



^^cA 



COUNTIES 


S MINISTERS 












T3 




o««««««i 


•■a 


AND 

CHURCHES. 


Ij AND 


-i 




1 


. 
-a 

1 


1 


s 

U 
1 

s 




1 


s 

o 




5 DELEGATES. 


.2 

1 


> 

o 

<u 
D2 


en 

1 

1 


«3 
a 


Excom 
Dead. 


1 

c 

^»4 




1 Bladen, — 


S Edward Harris, 












|l 1 


"^" 


2 


Beaver-Dam, 


^ Amos Cain, 


1 


. 








4 


1 


71 


2 Bladen, _ 


(^ Joseph Griffin, 


2 


















Big Swamp, 


S Nicholas Worby, 














34 


2 


3 Brunswick, 
















68 




Livingston, * 




















4- Brunswick, 


S ABRAHAM ROBINS, 1 




















Lockwood's Folly, 


^ Joel Robins, 


3 


12 












35 


2 


5 Columbus, 


5 JOB GOODMAN, 


















<w 


Seven Creeks, 






1 








2 




79 


2 


6 Cumberland, 


S JAS. A. RANACDSON,^ 




















Cape-Fear, 


«, Joseph Thames, 


14 


1 


1 


3 




8 




232 


3 


7 Duplin, 


S George Duncan. 




















Bear Marsh. 


h Timothy Spense, 


2 


1 


2 










59 


3 


8 Duplin, 


<J Mealous Thigpen, 




















Muddy Creek, 


S Richard Chasten. 


2 




32 




5 


2 


3 


139 


3 


9 Duplin, 


5 Phill. Southerland, 




1 


1 




2 


2 






Limestone, 


S Wm. A. Houston, 
















27 


1 50. 


10 Duplin, — 


S Jonathan Thomas, 






1 


2 


1 








Nahunga, 


h Howel Best, 










X 




^-^ 


30 


3 


11 New- Hanover, 


^ WILLIAM WELLS, 




















Bull Tail, 


S Samuel Buxton,! 


9 


4 


o 


2 




1 


o 


94. 


388 


12 New-Hanover, — 


/ Nathan Scarbrough,, 














l> 






Wilmington, 


c John Everit, 




2 


2 






1 




22 


2 


13 Onslow, 


S JESSE WEBB, 




















South-West, 


^ Thomas Pitt, 


1 


1 












32 


I 5@ 


14 Onslow, 


CJOHNGORNTO, 




















Everitt's M. H. 


S William Red, 


2 


1 










o 


80 


3 


15 Robeson, 


S Philip Speers, f 














vJ 






Ashpole, 


J^ John Barns 


3 




1 






I 


' 


57 


2 


16 Robeson, — 


S Jacob Fjeeman, 




















Saddletree, 




5 












2 


56 


2 


17 Sampson, 


^ Sherwood Holly, . 


















Mingo, 


^ Jordan Moore, 


5 


3 


1 






2 


1 


67 


1 50 


18 Wayne, — 


\ E. Burnum, 


















Thunder Swamp, 


|| Lewis Rouse, . 


9 










1 




65 


250 


19 Robeson, — 


i^ Gcdion Elventon, 










1 










Bear Swamp, 


S Lewis Thompson, 












1 




33 


2 


20 Sampson, 


> JOHN TUE, 










1 










Hornet's M. H. 


,, Mathew Wilson, 


1 


1 








2 




23 


1 


21 Sampson, 


s James Mathews, + 
















142 




Cohary, 


> Theophilus Stephens, 
S DAVID GRANTHAM, 


5 


1 


1 










3 


23 Sampson, 


















Seven Miles, 


S Simon Hobbs, 


4 






5 






1 


51 


2 ^ 


23 Onslow, 


^ SILUS CARTER, 




















Chapel Run, 


\ William Cox, 


1 


I 


1 






1 


1 


34 


1 


24 Sampson, — 


> David Cornegay, 


















Beulah. 


> Edward C. Gavin,f 
















62 |J3 


25 New-Hanover, 




















Reyley's Creek, 


^ 








' ' 






7 8 7 12 


% Since the rising o 


' the Association, the Cape_ 
ined brother RanaJdson fOr 


69 


30 


45 


12 


11 


30 


20 


1541 




Fear Church has obta, 


52 17 1-2 


their Pastor. 



















The ordained Ministers' names are in capitals; from Churches distinguished by an 
asterisk (*) we have no account, and the ir numbers arc represented as they stood the 
last year. Pastors and Messengers to w hose clinics j\n cbeliclc (f) is affixed, were ab 
acnt ; a dash ( — ) denotes a vacancy. 



( 6 ) 

CIRCULAR LETTER. 

Tiie Cafe-Fear BA^T1ST AssoerATiON, held at Muddy- 
Ci«ek, in Duyiin county, on the 1st of October, 1814. 

Tq the Churcheft they have the honour to refiretentf 
wish grace, mercy andfieace. 

BELOVED BRETHREN, 

AS the subject of this lettet'j permit lis 
to invite your serious attention to the obligation of 
christians to send the Gos/iel to (he Heathen. We 
are persuaded that all christians must feel a sense of 
gratitude towards their gracious Redeemer, for his 
powerful gospel which has been' the means of their 
salvation. They must likewise feel that lo-ue berth to 
God and man, which makes it their chief concern 
to obey the inandates of the one, and promote the 
hajifiiness of the other. They constantly pray for 
the i/iread of the gospel, and the salvation of sin- 
ners, whether Jews, Gentiles or Heathens. After 
all, we, who call ourselves christians, may, possi- 
bly be t90 remiss, or even entirely neglect this most 
important duty, and solemn obligation of disseminat- 
ing the gospel. This obligation will appear, 

First-*- /'Vom the very firincifiles of the religion %o'e 
profess. " Do good unto o// men, as we have op- 
portunity^* ; or " .Do to others, as ye would they 
should do unto you," is the consentaneous voice of 
Prophets and Apostles, the nohle. principles of our 
holy religion : by which we are to be governed. If 
the go -.pel be esteemed by us an invaluable blessing, 
the richest gift bestowed on man ; can v/e evince 
more philanthiophy, can we do greater good, than 
by sending it to the poor and needy ? Not to use 
our endeavours for the salvation «f the Heathen, is 
ttf give our profession the lie. 

Secondly, — The strong obligation to disseminate the 
srof^fieli %ifiU appear from the plain iy positive command 

of 



C '' ) 

>^ our Divine Master. « Go ye into at] the w©rH 
and preach the gospel to every creature ;— tesch all 
nalionsy baptizing th«m in the name of the Father, 
and of the S.on, and of the Holy Ghost j teachibg 
them to observe all things, which I have command- 
ed you ;. and lo, I am with you always even to the 
end of the world." The injunctions contained in 
these emphatic words of Jesus, were binding, not 
on the Apostles only, but on all succeeding Ministers 
and Christians to the end of the world. It is im- 
possible in the naUue of things, thata single individu- 
al could " go into all the world," or that even the 
Bumber of Apostles were sufficient to " teach all 
nations." Many nations are yet untaugii;t, aixd tlie 
indispensable obligation of sending them the gospel, 
still devolves on every one that naines the n'ame of 
Christ. , 

3. This obligation of. christians, ivill afifiear still 
tnore obvious and urgent frojn the lamentable state of 
the floor Heal ken. The greater part of the world 
still lies enveloped in gross darkness. There are 
hundreds of millions of Adam's children, ntiho knoTV 
not the only true God and Jesus Christ ivhotn he hath 
sent. These, destitute of the light of the gospel, 
are led captive at the will of the Devil, into the 
most absurd superstitions, abominable idolatries, and 
excruciating rites. Here they bow the knee in ado- 
ration to their dumb Gods ; and there they immolate 
thousands of* human beings Oil the bloody altar of 

superstition ! 

* The cruel deaths, and sahgUiiiary rites, practised by the 
Hindoos under the name oi religion, must be shocking to 
the 'eelings of humanity. Besides many ways of lacerating 
their own bodies, such as swinging with hooks passed thro' 
the intiguments of the back, spits or other instruments of 
iron passed through the tongue or forehead, &c, — parents 
a.re allowed to sacrifice their own Children to the Goddess 
Gunga -y many are hung up on trees or baskets to be devour- 
ed by bir-ds of prey ; both men and women drown them- 
selves in the river Ganges ; and many devote t'*^emselves to 
death by failing under the wlifeels of the machine which car- 
ries their Gods, Widows are buried and burned alive with 



( « ) 

tupersthioii I If we can believe the account of thesi^ 
enonrtities ^mong the Heathen, and yet feel no boitr- 
els of compassion, no desire to communicate the 
knowledge of the Saviour ; is it likely that we, tur- 
selves, can know either the value of the Soul, or the 
benifits of the gospel ? But if we know these things, 
is it not likely that we shall also know, our obligation 
to use our endeavours to send the gospel of Salvation 
to the Heathen ? " If ye know these things, happy 
are ye if ye do them." 

W hile we view the means or instruments as inade- 
quate, we hesitate, and are afraid t« begin the work, 
lest we might not fcucceed, and scoffers should turn 
oar laudable attempts into derision. We are apt to 
imagine there are insuperable difficulties to encoun- 
ter in sending the gospel to the Heathen. But do 
not these surmises proceed from unbelief ? Are We 
not encouraged by the faithful promises of God ; 
and supported by the infallible^ predictions of his 
word, which assures great success in this work ? 
•' Lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the 
world," is the promise of encouragement to all his 
servant-s ; and this promise is annexed to the solerhn 
injunction, " Go ye into all the world, and preach 
the gospel to every creature. For, " This gospel 
of the kingdom shall be preached in ail (he iverid"—. 
*• his righteousness shall go forth as brightness, and 
his salvation as a lamp that burneth." The Lord has 
promised his Son the Heathen for his inheritance, 
s.nd the uttermost /iarts of the earth for his posses- 
sion. The forces of (he Gentiles shall flow into 
Ziioni-—zn(\ the abundance of the Seas shall be con- 
verted unto him. The Js<ws shall be called in toge- 
ther with the fulness of the Gentiles, — the earth 
shell be full of the knowledge of the Lord, and eve- 
tj nation shall call him blesse-d. We are encourag- 
ed 

their deceased hesbands. It is ecmputed, tlxat the uumber- 
of widovrs who perish by self-devoteni£nt in the northern 
provinces of Hindostan alone, are not less than Ten Thou- 
sand annuiUly ! ! 



( 9 ) 

fid 10 hope the time is not far distant^ for these glori- 
ess promises and predictions to be fulfilled. Do we 
not already see the dawning of that auspicious day 
in the eastern world, ■which prognosticates the rising 
of the brilliant SUN of righteousness, whose reful- 
gent brightness shall chase away the night of hea- 
thenish darkness. 

Of late a great mtssiofiRry spirit has been kindled 
fa Europe. Through its influence great things have 
been attempted, and much good has been the result. 
The Holy Scriptures have been cither translated, ©i" 
are now translating into eighteen of the oriental lan- 
guages. The g*spel is now preached in many 
strange tongues, and Churches are now erected 
ftmong the Heathen. Christians of different de- 
nominations seem to have their hearts united in this 
great work. 

The missionary spirit has reached America also. 
Several Missionaries have already been sent out un- 
der the patronage of one Presbyterian and Congre- 
gational BiCthren in the North. Two of these? 
since their arriral in India, have changed their senti- 
ments with regard to Christian Baptism ; and, still 
desirous to puisue their missionary career, now look 
to their Baptist Brethren in America for assistance. 
We wish not upon this occasion to triumph over our 
PedO' Baptist Brethren, but they, with us may re- 
joice at the prospect of carrying on the Mission in 
two important branches. 

Since the Rev. Luther Rice (one of the individu- 
als alluded to above) returned to America, Societies 
have been organized in different parts of our Unien for 
the support of Foreign Missions. A General Con- 
vention of Delegates from these Societies was held 
in the City of Philadelphia last May, for the purpose 
of eliciting, combining and directing the energie's of 
the whole Baptist Denomination in America. The 
facility with which Societies have been* formed, »nd • 
the pecuniary aid afforded by them, as well as by 

■ " ■ generous 

* There are now Twenty-two Societlca. extending from 
BostoB to Savannah. 

Aa 



( 10 ) 

fTfneroust rndiv'iduals, far exceeded out- most san- 
guine expectations. This surely is the Lord's do- 
ings, and it is marvalous in our eyes! In the midst 
of the revolutions of Empires and Kingdoms, and 
overturning of the nations ; and in spite of the rag- 
ing powers of darkness ; the Redeemer's Kingdom 
is advancing towards that glorious period, when it 
shall be proclaimed, " The kingdoms of the world 
have becorec the kingdom of our Lord and of his 
Christ." God Almi'ghty, to receive the greater glo- 
vy, may employ but feeble means and insignificant 
instruments to accomplish this great work. Who 
among you Brethren, will now venture, to come 
viptothe help of the Lord against the mighty ? 

This is the favourable opportunity to try your 
fuith, and prove your love. Brother Judson and 
■^vife are now in India, anxiously looking .for the re- 
turn of Brother Rice. There is the great harvest 
for the Missionaries. The cry is, * Come over into 
Asia, come over into Asia, and help us 1 Brother 
Rice,' (ivho we esteem highly in love for his work's 
sake) will shortly bid as adieu, and again try the pe- 
rils of the sea, to go to his Colleague in India, where 
ihey will probably spend their days in the labours of 
the gospel. These worthy Missionaries, who have 
left their native country, their friends, their rela- 
tionsj tl'ieir all, v/e may say ; for the sake of the gos- 
pel ; will deserve ourluve, and merit our patronage. 
They do now solicit our pecuniary aid. Brethren, 
without v/hich, they cannot prosecute their arduous 
and expensive labours. But shall they solicit in vain, 
and be compelled to return for the want of susten- 
ance ? V/e trust net. While we enjoy the fruits ef 
our native land, and possess a goodly heritage, we 
trust his servants shall not want, who have ts bear 
the burden and 'the heat of the day. Then, let eve- 
ry one in particular, who feels his obligation to send 
Lhe go^ipel to the Heathen, lay by him in store as God 

has 

t A gcntkaian of New-York, contributed ^ 100. 



( n ) 

ha? prospered hlrn ; and contribute little or ir.wch as 
he has ability. For it is accepted according to that a 
man hath, and not according to that he hath not. 
Let noi poverty itself, nor our present exigencies, 
prevent us from cantributing dL little ; remembering 
that large sums are made up of many littles. In 
union, there ia strength. Were each Baptist in the 
United States to contribute Terj Cents onXji this 
itself would amount to about Trjenty Thausand Dol- 
lars per annum. This sum would support a number 
of Missionaries, and much be appropriated to the 
translation of the Scriptures We will not say where 
is the Baf).tist^ but where is the man of civilization, or 
the man of honour or sensibility, who would not con- 
tribute Ten Cents or more, for the benefit of the 
Hcatlien ? It must be admitted there are some too 
covetous to impart liberally, too proud to contribute 
sparingly. But we hope such will not dare lift up 
their voice against the sacred work, in order to pal- 
liate their own parsimony. 

It is not t)«e dssign of the Association, to exact 
contributions f om the Churches they represent ; but 
merely to inform them, that there is a-n opening in 
Divine Providence for every one among us to con- 
tribute to the propagation of the gsspel, through the 
medium if the Societies now formed in various 
parts of our Union. We hope every Association 
will yield a favourable countenance to thsee laudable 
Institutions; and that every individual will afford 
the .1 some peeuniary aid. Should we not even re- 
joice, Brethren, that we have this fair opportunity, 
of comiag up to the help of the Lord against the 
mighty powers of darkness. 

Let us not, dc-ar Bretliren, indulge the least dis- 
couragement, either on the account of ouo' poverty, 
or the tribulation oi the times. The Lord reigneth } 
and he superintends the work. It may be his plea- 
sure to build the walls of Zion in troubleous times ; 
this will only make his potent arm the more conspi- 
cuous. 



< 12 ) 



I 



caovis. He may accomplish his work with apparent"/ 
Jy inadequate means ; tl>is too shall redound to Win 
glory. Or if he sees fit, he can employ the* ^rtad 
and the rich in this work. 

Finally, Brethren, the tery eventful period in; 
M'hich Gad has cast oQr lot, should operate as an fX-» 
• itement to our zeal and adtitity. The devil know*, 
>»is time is bm short. He worfceth mighiely in the; 
children of disobedience. This is an ivnexampleitj. 
period ; a most important crisis ! ! But the war*, 
and rumours of wars } the heavy judgments that are" 
executed j indicate that the- Lord is on his way. 
Soon, very s©t>n will the cry be heard Bubyion the 
great U fallen^ i&Jallen ; and then shall ihe kingdom 
and dcrniiniorif a?id the greatiitss of the kirigdom^ un-^'^ 
(ler the whole heaven^ be given to the fieo/ile of lAfi 
Saints of the Most Highy ivho^e kingdom ia an frtr-i 
lasting kingdom^ and all dominions ahail nerve and e-' 
hey hint. Give yourselves much to Humiliation j 
Fasting, and Prayer 5— -be perfect ; be of good com- 
fort ; be of one mind ; live in peace ; be tender 
hearted, forgiving one another; and be ready to di<:- 
tribute, willing to communicate ; and the God of 
peac« and love shall be with you. Amen. 

JOSEPH THAMES, Moderator. 
JAMES A. RANALDSOM, Ctetk. 



* Ptolemy Philadelphiis, was instrum«-!tcl.iii translating 
the ijcriptures into the Greek Idngoage. He employed Se- 
venty-two of the learned natives of Judea in this work, 
which is called the Septuagint; the expense oi which is lom- 

P'-'i.Sv « Tv/0 Millions Sterling, 



mNUTES 

OF THE 

VAPE-FEAR 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

"fcOXVENED IN 

J^eiv Hanover County, Bull Tale Meeting HbiisP, 
Saturdaij, October 5, 1816. 

TO WHICH IS ADDED, 

REPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 



A LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS FROM TWENTY' 
SIX CHURCHES. 



wiLMij\/'GTOjy, jv* e, 

JPRINTED BY THOMAS LORINO- 
1816. 



MINUTES, &c.. 



1. THE Introductory Sermon was delivered by 
Elder Williams, agreeably to appointment, from 
St. John, Xtli Chapter., 9th verse. After Divine 
Service, the Association retired from the stage, and 
convened in the house. Proceeded to business.— 
Eider Bryant prayed. 

2. Chose Brother Joseph Thyms moderator ; 
Brother Samuel Buxton clerk, and Brother James 
Rapheiid assistant clerk. 

3. Appointed Brethren Oats, Mattliias, and Fay- 
son, assistants, a Committee of Finance, to receive 
the contributions, make settlements, and report 
Accordingly. 

4. Then received letters from 26 Churches, by 
the hands of their Delegates, with their contribu- 
tions. A Report of w luch is hereunto annexed. 

5. Visiting Brethren in the Ministry being pre- 
sent, were invited to take seats with us. Elder 
Rkeves, from our sister Charleston Association, a 
Delegate to us, and Elder White, a volunteer 
visitor; both came forv.ard and took seats agreeably 
to request. 

6. Report for Correspondent Letters from dif- 
ferent Associations. One from the Charleston 
Association was read, and cordially received. 

7. Received two Petitions from two ne-aly con- 
stituted Churches, ^iz: — New Hanover countv, 



Maple Hill, and Bladen county, Walker's Bluft", 
Their state being found ortliodox, were cordially 
received. 

8. Then appointed Bretliren to write Correspon- 
dent Letters. Elder Morriss, to Chaileston ; Elder 
Etherage, to Raleigh; Elder Goodman, to Neus, 
Associations. 

9. Then distiibuted some copies of the Mission- 
ary Board, together with some Minutes from the 
Ciiarleston Association. 

10. Appointed Brethren to preach to-morrow- 
Elders White, Goodman, and Reevhs. 

11. Adjourned until Monday, 9 o'clock. Prayer 
by Elder White. 



LORD'S BAY. 

The Brethren appointed to preach to-diiy, meet 
a veiy large and extensive audience. Elder VVhite 
first on the stage, preached from Isaiah, XXXIld 
Chapter, ITth verse; Goodman, from RomanSf 
Xth Chapter, 14th and loth verses, on the Mis- 
sionary Sclieme; Reeves, from St. Luke, XXVIth 
Cl'iUpter, 43d verse. These services were solemn 
and impressive, and on them a numerous conjn-e«;a- 
tion waited with silcat and devout attention. 



12. Monday, meet from adjournment. Elder 
Goodman prayed. 

13. The Brethren aj"p:>inted to write the Cor- 
respondent Letters, h.aaded them in. They were 
read, and received; then signed by the Moderator 
and Clerk. 



14. Then ilele^ated Brethren to our Si^:ter Asso- 
ciations — Elder Goodman, to Charleston Associa- 
tion; Elder. Bryant, to Neus Association; Elder 
Thyms, to Raleigh Association. 

15. Appointed Brother Charles M'Ailester as 
our Correspondent Secretary of the ISIissiouary 
Scheme. 

16. Appointed Elder Mouriss to write our Cir- 
cular Letter for nest year. 

17. Kecommended by this .Association, That tl.e 
fourth day of July next be set apart for a day of 
Tlianks^;iving to Almighty God for his mercies. 

18. i-csohecU That tiiis Association return their 
thanks to the inliabitants of Bull Tale, for their 
kind usage to t!iis Association; and also their 
sincere thanks to the congregation at large, for 
their libe^-a! contribution tar the promotion of the 
Missionary Sclieme. 

19. Resolved, That as our beloved and dear 
brot!^;er, James A. Ranaldson, has prospects of 
being more eminently useful in other parts of our 
country, togeth.er with his strong impresfdons to 
remove, from various considerati-jns, we are happy 
to ce'.tlfy, wi:h impaitial candor, that the aforesaid 
bi-other has, since he espoused tlie Clu-istian Reli- 
gion, supported tiie cliaractor of a zealous and 
upright T'leriiber of our body, orthodox and evange- 
lical in principle; an.d that he has been regularly 
ordained and called to tlie Ministry among us, and 
has preached with peculiar accepta'.ice ana SL-iccess 
for several years — We, tlieiefure, as a b:)dy, fee! at 
liberty to i-ecomraend the abovementioned brother 
to the tender re>:;aras of the Christian Church of 
every order and denomination. 



9J). Ordered^ That our next Association be he13 
in Robinson county, at Pitman's Meeting Housv?, 
to commence on Saturday, before the fijst Sunday 
in October, 1817. Service to begin at ten o'clock 
in the forenoon. 

21. Appointed Elder David Thyms to preach 
the rntroductorj i?ermon, in case of failure Elder 
Ethrage. 

22. Ordered, That five hundred and fifty copies 
of these IMiautes be printed, and that the Clerk 
distribute them as farmetly ; reserving twenty -five 
copies of them, which he is hereby requested to 
■convey to Elder James A. liANALosoN, as a token 
of our esteem, 

23. The Committee of Finance came forward 
Vv ith their Report, wliich is as follows ; 

Received from the Churches this year, § 57 
Remaining in the Treasury from last year, 68 45 



Paid the Clerk for printing, 
Paid the Clerk for his services, 
Allowed Elder Williams, a delegate, 



For the Missionary Firm from tr.e 

Churches, - - - - -§16 5 
-From tlie Con2;ren;atien at larrre, - 44 67 



125 


45 


15 




110 


45 


14 




9G 


45 


6 




S90 


45 



S4. Then adjourned, (prayer by Elder GorntoJ 
io place and time before mentioned. 

(Signed) JOSEPH THYMS, 

Moderator. 
SAMUEL BUXTON, Clerk. 

Resolved, That our Association do recommend 
the annexed Report of the Corresponding Secre- 
tary, by way of Circular Letter, or in the lieu 
fliereof. 

JOSEPH THYMS, 
Moderator^ 
SAMUEL BUXTON, Clerk. 



REPORT 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 



BELOVED BRETHREN- 
INDULGE me the satisfaction of present- 
ing the following communications ; with a letter from 
the corresponding Secretary of the Baptist Board 
for Foreign Missions, and 30 copies of the ' Second 
Annual Report.' 

The momentous subject of evangelical Missions 
is found in almost every recent publication from the 
press, whether religious, civil or political. It has 
become the daily theme of the pulpit, has claim- 
ed the universal attention of religious Associations, 
and lias even reached the recesses of the cabinet. 
Christendom has waged spiritual war with the heath- 
en world :— aimed with the panoply of Heaven, ajid 
led by the captain of Salvation, she is marching on 
to victory, slaying her thousands with the edge of 
the sword ! T'le rise and spread of Missionary and 
Bible institutions, are such as to create surprise and 
astonishment. The prospects are still brightening 
before us — the prospects of the near approach of the 
hitter days., wUich kings and prophets desired to 



' 9 

see! It appears from the sljrns of tbe times t'lat we 
live to see an a2;e of imnders, a most memorable 
epoch of the chrii^tiaii church. 

Great success attends the Mission in India, wliose 
more immediate seat is at Serampore, on the waters 
of the GaP..<5es. Dr. Carer, thusicriies: '• The field 
of Missionary exertion in this country, and those 
that surround if, is every day encieasina; and ex- 
tending itself as it respects all branches of the world.'' 
Twenty stations have already been formed, and 
about I'orty preachers, most of them natives, and a 
fcM' years ago worshippers of idols, are iiow preach- 
ing to their brethren the unsearchable riches of Chiist. 

The God of mercy has in his providence, without 
any concurrence on our part, placed our wortiiy 
brother Adoniram Judson at Rangoon, a principal 
sea-port of the Burman dominions. This station is 
highly important on account of the si-eatness of the 
ponuiation, the miserable condition of the inhabitants 
and its proximity to the Chinese empire. 

In December last our brother G. H. Hough, of 
Pawtucket, R. I. with his wife and two small chil- 
dren, together with our amiable and pious sister 
Cliarlotte W. White, of Philadelphia, set sail from 
the port of Philadelphia, for Calcutta, on their way 
to Rangoon. Edward Thompson, Esq. whose gene- 
rosity is M'ell known, furnished a passage and pro- 
•^-isions for the voyage gratuitously. 

Our highly esteemed brother Luther Rice, is still 
xletained in this country as Agent of the Board. 
His very laborious and useful services in the United 
States, have been wonderfully successful. His great 
self-tlevotion to the best of causes, must ensure the 
•entire confidence and salisfaction of his brethren. 



10 

It may he proper to state that tho two last remit- 
tances from the " N. C. Baptist vSociety for foreign 
Missions," were not received hj tiie Treasurer of 
the Board in time to be inserted in the " Annual Re- 
port." This delinquency must be attributed to the 
sudden death of our Treasurer, which caused a lit- 
tle embarrassment. Our Society remitted 200 dol- 
lars the last year, and 500 dollars this year. It is 
believed that the N. C. Society will be able to col- 
lect for the Mission 500 dollars annually, exclusive 
of the Society formed by the Chowan Association 
in this State. 

It is truly encouraging to learn that there are now 
formed, it least seventy-, ne Mission Societies, and 
one hundred and eight bible societies in the United 
States. These co-oper ling with Bible and Missio- 
nary institutions in Europe, may truly " attempt 
great things," and with the blessing of God, may 
accomplish great things. 

The "Annual Report," while it affords much use- 
ful information, it exhibits a large table of the Asso- 
ciations, and serves as an excellent medium of cor- 
respondence for all the Baptist churches in the 
United States. We learn from it with pleasure, the 
nnion of efforts in promoting the grand evangelical 
design of imparting the gospel to the benighted tribes 
of the earth. Most of the Associations have become 
auxiliary to the Board, and all yield a favourable 
countenance. A denomination consisting of nearly 
two hundred thousand^ and many of these wealthy, 
surely will afford liberal means for the propagation 
of the Gospel. 

The great work of translating the Holy Scriptures 
i.Tito the oriental languages; is going on with uaex- 



it 

ainpled expedition. The demand for the P b'e in- 
creases both in Asia and America; The New Tes- 
tament is now translated into the Chinese language, 
which language is said to be spoken by upwards of 
three hundred millions. Several thousand Testa- 
ments have been distributed and where it was doubt- 
ed whether one Bible could have been imparted, it 
seems there is a demand for at least Fifty Millions: 
but these cannot be furnished for want of funds. 

The harvest truly is plenteous. Missionaries and 
Bibles are wanting not only in lands involved in th.e 
darkness of heathenism, but also in many parts of 
our own country, where they have neither read the 
Bible nor heard it explained. It is believed that the 

firopriety of originating a Western Mission, on a 
arge scale, embracing the country beyond the Mis- 
sissippi, will engage the deliberations of the next 
Triennial Convention. 

Through the zealous and laudable exertions of the 
"Louisiana Bible Societjs*' thousands of Bibles in 
French, Spanish and English, have been gratuitously 
distributed among the inhabitants of Louisiana. Our 
beloved brother Benjamin Davis, has been appointed 
Agent of the Society, to travel and distribute Bibles 
in every part of the State. In some instances the 
word of life is received with demonstrations of joy 
and gratitude. 

" Among the applicants for Bibles," says the re- 
port of the Louisiana Bible Society, " there have 
been several who declared that they had been en- 
deavouring for years, some as many as for 12 or 15 
years, to obtain a copy of the Bible in French. Dif- 
ferent methods and expressions were made use of 
by difierent persons, to manifest their joy and satis- 



IS 

faction on obtaining what they had so long been iu 
quest of: soni',: declared no present coiilu be more 
acceptable to t'.iQin, and others that they esteemed it 
beyond buniireds of doUars." 

Although thii Bible is given tliem, and many are 
able to read it, still it appeais tliey have no protec- 
tant or evangelical preachers to exph in to them the 
unsearchable riches of the Gospel. Our excellent 
brother Conielius Paulding, has generously prepared 
a commodious brick building in the city of New Or- 
leans, for a bouse of worship ; and has used his zeal- 
ous and pious exertions to procure a preacher, but 
has not yet succeeded. Here is an extensive har- 
vest whicii invites the attention of Missionary and 
Bible institutions. 

It is highly gratifying to observe the harmony and 
union which exist between christiaiis of different de- 
nominations, in the noble design of evangelizing the 
heathen. Montgomery, (the poet.) \n a speech at 
the formation of a Methodist JJissioiiarii Hociety^ 
said, "In the Bible Society all names and distinc- 
tions of sects are blended till th.ey are lost, like the 
primatic colours in a ray of pure and perfect light. 
In the Missionary work, though diN ided, they are 
not discordant : but like the same colours displayed 
and harmonized in the Rainbow, they form an aich 
of glory — ascending, on the one hand, from earth to 
heaven : and on the other, descending from heaven 
to earth — a bow of promise ; a covenant of peace ; 
a sign that the storm is passing away, and the Sun 
of Righteousness with healing in his wings, breaking 
forth on all nations." 

in tine, with pleasure we learn that whilst chris- 
tians are endeavouring to distribute the woi-d of life 



13 

to others, tljey aie bountifully fed themselves; li'jer- 
al souls are made fat. In various parts of oMr coun- 
try, very extensive and liappy revivals have been 
realized araoiigdiilereut denomir.atioas of christian!?. 
Hundreds have been added to the churches; nndia 
several colleges and other seminaries of learninir, 
many of the promising youth have been inaJe the 
happy subjects of this glorious revival. May v,e n:;! 
cheribh the hope, that Gtid is about to rai.;e up a 
"great company" to publish his word among the 
heathen! The Redeemers kingdom is advancing;. 
Truth is povverful; her weapons are invinoib'e. 
We believe the day is not far distant, when "^ the 
kingdoms of this world, shall have became tlie I<>ii^- 
dom of our Lord and of his Christ." The Bibio 
will, probably, soon be read in all tlie languages of 
the East, and be put into the. hands of aU the poor." 
" Rigliteousness shall go forth as a lamp tliat bur- 
netii:" Zion shall arise and shine with the a,iory of 
tiie Lord; the Gentiles shall come to her H^ht, and 
kings to tlie brightness of her rising; Vvhen "she 
looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clean 
as the sun, and terrible as an army with baiiacrs." 

JAMES A. RANALDSON. 

Carres^ondin^ Secrzta'.'ij. 

Countersigned hy 



JOSEPH TIIYMS, Moderator. 
SAMUEL BUXTON, Clcvlc. 



October 5th, 1816, 



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Wm. Kemp. 
Abs. Robbins, 
M: Ward. 
D. M'Cullar, 
Thomas Russ, 
Ezl. Bryant, 
James Ray. 
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MINUTES 

OF THE 
% 

■ CAPE-FEAR 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOM, 

. CONVENED IN 

ROBESOJ^ COUJ^TF, FITMdJV'S MEETING HOUSE, 

Saturday, October % I8I7. 

TO WHICH IS ADDED4 

THE CIRCULAR LETTER 

OF SAID ASSOCMTIOJ\r! 

AND 

^ LIST OF MINISTERS, DELEGATES, &c 

FROM TWENTY-NINE CHURCHES, 



rPrice of Printing five hundred copies. Twenty Dollars.] 



wiumijvgtojY, jv. a 
Printed by thomas loring, 

1817^ 



MINUTES, &c. 



THE Introductory Sermon was delivered by Efder Ibaao 
Etherage, from Jiide, 5th verse ; and from the zeal and enga2;e- . 
ment of the preacher, and the attention of the hearers, we hopp for 
a Divine Blessing to follow. After Divine Service was over, the 
Association convened and proceeded to businesa.. Elder Whit-e 
prayed, 

J. Cliose Elder Job Goodman, Moderator s 

Samuel Buxton, Clerk ; 

James Rapheilo, Assistant Clerk, 

2. App^nted^Brethren .Oats and Morriss a committee of finance j 
to receive the contributions, make settlements, and report. 

3. Then received; intelligence from twenty -nine Churches. A 
statement of their standing is hereunto annexed. 

4. Then visiting Brethren in the Ministry being present, M'ere 
invited to take seats with us. Elder White, from South Carolina, 
cordially took a seat with us; and Elder Reaves, from Charles- - 
town Association* 

5. Report for correspondent letters from different associations.— 
Received one from Charlestown, by her delegate Elder Reaves ; 
and one from Nuese, with some copies of her minutes. 

6. Then received a letter from a new constituted Church, in 
Sampson county. New Hope, craving admission in our body, was 
found orthodox and received. 

7. Then appointed Brethren to write correspondent letters.— 
Elder Isaac Etherage, to write and carry one to Charlestown 
Association ; and Brother Raphield, to write to Nu€se Associa- 
tion. No report from the Raleigh Association, leaves us at a loss 
how to correspond with her this year. 

8. The circular letter for this year, was then handed in by Elder 
Morriss, read and cordially received, and signed by the Modei ator 
and Clerk. 

9. Then appointed Brethren to preach to-morrow, viz :— Elder 
White, Wells, and Morriss ; service to begin at 10 o'chick.-^ 
Adjourned until Monday, cine o'clock. Elder Wells prayed. 



4 

LORD'S DAY. 

The Brethren appointed to preach to-day, meet a very large and 
extensive auditory. Wells, first on the stage, preached fVom 
Bt. Luke, Chap. VIL 2Zd and 2^d verses. Mob pass, from Jsaicft, 
Chap. XXHL 13th verse. White, from Isaiah, Chap. XIL 9d 
verse. From the zeal and engagements of the speakers, and the 
hearers, we hope and trust a special blessing will follow the laboi-s 
of the day. 



10. Monday, the Association meet from adjournment. Elder 
Reaves prayed. 

11. Then the correspondent letters were handed forward, and 
signed by the Moderator and Clerk. 

12. Then appointed Elder Etherage to write the circular letter 
for next year. 

13. Then the Association, in concert, do recommend to the dif- 
ferent Churches they represent, to set apart- the first day of March 
next, to implore mercies from Mniighty God on vegetation the 
ensuing season ; and the first day of September next, to b6 set 
apart for returning thanks to the Lord. 

14. Then directed the Clerk to have five hundred copies of these 
Minutes printed, and make distribution as ordinary, reserving one 
copy for the Missionary BoaixJ. 

15. Then a distribution was made of some copies of minutes 
from several sources of our connection. 

16. llien appointed Elder David Thyms, to preach the Intro- 
ductory Sermon to our next Association. In case of failure^ Elder 
Job Goodman. 

17. Then this Association do hereby acknowledge themselves iit 
the following manner, viz: — They return their sincere thanks to 
the inhabitants of Ash Pole, for thefr hospitality to this Association. 

18. Then the Association, still in concert, do give to our much 
esteemed Elder White, ten dollars out of our funds, for his atten- 
tion to us. 

19. Then the Committee of Finance came forward with their 
^-eport, which is as follows : 

Received from twenty -nine Churches, this year, - S'51 55 

Remaining in the Treasury from last year, - - 90 45 

142 
Paid for printing the Minutes from last year, -. - 20 

12g 



5 

Paid tlie Clerk tor his services, 

Allowed to Elder White, 



Paid the Corresponding Secretary, for bad money and 
postage, -•- - - - - , - 



From the several Churchc& to the Missionary Fnud, g 27 29 

20. Then, Ordered^ That- oar ne^rt- Association be' in Duplin 
county, at Limestone Meeting House ; to commence the Saturday 
before the first Lord's Day, iu October next. 

21. Then adjourned to time and place. Elder White prayed. 

. - (Signed) ^B GOOBM AN, Moderator, y 

Samuel Buxton, Cleric^, 



14 




108 
10 


98 
2 


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8 95 


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lUm^f^v %itUv> 



THE CAPE-FEAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



ASSEMBIED AT 



J'ttmari's Meeting Rouses Robeson County, J\r. C. 
OcTOBEB. 4, 1817.' 

To the Churches they represent, send Christian 
Sakitation : 

BELOVED BRETHREN^— 

Having, under tlie indulgent care of a kind Providence^ 
enjoyed another friendly interview with the Churches, through the 
medium of your delegates, we again address you in the spirit of 
christian affection. 

Suffer us, therefore, to call your attention to the subject of read- 
ing and studying the Holy Scriptures — a subject at once calculated 
to convict the mind of its grand importance. 

To the Scriptures must we apply for suitable direction on the 
point now to be considered. The Lord, by his servant Joshua, 
spake to the children of Israel, saying — " This book of the law 
shall not depart out of thy mouth : but thou shalt meditate thereia 
day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that 
is written therein ; for then tlwu shalt make thy way prosperous, 
and shalt have good success."— Jbs/^«fl, I. 8. 

The injunction here implied, is addressed to the whole house of 
Israel, and is, therefore, applicable to our present purpose, as having 
a regard to the xluty of all, who now name the name of Jesus, by a 
christian profession. 

In another* place we hear the illustrious psalmist David, pro- 
nounce the most encouraging benedictions on tnose whose delightis 
in the law of the Lord, in which they meditate day and night. — Sei 
Fmbn I. 2, 5. Again, the law of the Lord is perfect converting 
(or restoring) the soi\l. 



Piassing on from the testimony given by some of those pious 
worshipers of God, under the old dispensation, our attention is 
arrested by those memorable words of Jesus — " Search the Scrip- 
tures"— was the divine mandate of Him, who arose triumphant 
from the dead, to open the undei-standing of erring men, that tliey 
might understand the scriptures. The Apostles, we have reason to 
believe^ taught this doctrine from time to time, with impressive 
eloquence, for we behold the Bereans engaged daily in this pious 
work.— ^cfs, Xn/. 11. 

Paul charges his beloved son Timothy to give attendance to read- 
ing, which is virtually a charge to " Search the Scriptures," and to 
take heed to the sacred volume, as unto a light that shines in a 
dark place. Having thus made a brief use of some of the texts 
which have a relation to the subject under consideration, we shall 
attempt a more close and particular illustration of the matter. 

That it is the high duty of all who teach the word, diligently to 
read and study the Bible, is a truth so plain and evident, that it 
needs no investigation 5 but a fact it is, as melancholy as evident, 
that many who profess an interest in this good book, pay too little 
regard to the exercise of reading and meditation. The evils whicli 
result from an inattention to scripture trutl>s, are too numerous here 
to state at large 5 we shall, therefore, only point out a few of the 
most prominent. 

It has, of late, become unfashionable to use the Bible in most of 
our schools. What is the consequence ? Simply this, that many 
of our youth are learning to ridicule the all-important subject of the 
christian religion, before they arrive at a historical acquaintance 
witli the book which contains them, and raise objections against 
they know not what. Others are deprived of those salutary and 
lasting impressions, which are generally the effect of an early 
acquaintance with the holy scriptures. 

A disregard of the scriptures has the most pernicious effects on 
the spiritual growth of the christian professor — this is what causes 
many to wade through a vale of moral gloom, to murmur at the 
opperations of that hand which is unerring, and repine at dispensa- 
tions which cannot be accounted for without a serious attention to 
the word of God. David found himself sliding into difficulties of 
this nature, bu^ qs soon as he went into the sanctuary his distresses 
were removtu. 

A careless indifference of the infallible standard, by which our 
lives and actions must be measured, leaves us in a state of uncer- 
tainty with respect to many of the grand essentials of religion. — 
The Church originally formed at Rome, through her lamentable 
inattention to the true standard, though her faith was once spoken 
of throughout the whole world, yet now she is styled the mother of 
harlots ,• and most of the errors which now exist in the christian 
world, may be traced back to the papal authority. 



Heijcc we islwuk} refid tbe Bitxle in hutnili{.3', wiUiia firm con ii- 
..dence-ia that God who iioerally dispenses wisilom, to guide the 
understanding of fsl! who ask in faith. We should karn to receive. 
;;the word in a good ami honest heart, Tor tjiis is spirit and this ip 
-life. JSieilher should we wrest the sciptures to our own hurt, or 
.object to that which is hard for.short-s.ijihted mortals to understands 
rtut bow with awe and profound revei^enGe to thei hJ2;Ji wisdom dia- 
iplaved.in the sacced pag^es, which so £ar jsarpasses tlie*iu»t., exited 
fl?|;i!ts of human sagacit}'. . , 

Christians' sboidd diligently guard laga'wst stiffetiing cQvicernmonts 
of a worldly nature to get the ascendency, so far as to divert tjiem 
from a haljitual use of the Bible. They shouW watcji, least the 
enetnygfit an adv'anta^e over then>, and rob them of nxucli of their 
spirituai support, which must be th'av.u from this inejchaiistible 
fountain of light and life divine. To this book must we. resort for 
a r^y of Ileavealy light, to illuminate this gloomy vvaJe, tkiPQugh 
:^hich we are passing on to brighter worlds above. 
. To this are we indebted for insitryctions. relative both to faith 
((and practice. Here the Pastor leacns his awful responsibility; and 
here the piiyate Christian learns his duty. Here the heavy laden 
.dinner seeks repose with a happy success ; and here tlie wogajded 
*ons.cieo(;e finds a sovereign cure. And., here tUe Church may read 
her Father's Will; the will of Him who sealed it .with His blood; 
■_a will wMch secures to the heir a rich inheritance indeed, even an 
incorruj>tible crov.'n which fadeth riot ajv\ ay. 

This will is registered beyond tlje skies. Its language, Father, 
I will that they also whom thou hast given me, he with me wber« 
I am, that they may behold my glory. 

Here the Heavenly nxariner finds his compass, which conducts 
acr.o^s .tjje ^tofjAy .sea of human life; by which lie soon shall safely 
en^er the port of endless' rest. Thus we sec the scriptures form a 
gloriousiight that leads to -God. 

Patents, take care that your .children he broiight up in the 
nurture and admonition of the Lord. Lot their youthful, uJipreju- 
diced mind^, be directed to those great subjects, which are cacwlated 
to render deatb-bed reflections easy and pleasant. Suffer thera not 
Jo spend the Holy Sabbath in profajie amusements and unprofitable 
?risiting; hut let tliem have an early acquaintance with the sacred- 
Hess ot the day, and the manner also in which it should be spent. 

Having g^lie' as far as our limits will allow, vve must draw to a 
clqse, by c-ommending you, dear brethren, to God and to the word 
of His grace, vthich is able to build you up, and establish y«u ia 
every good word and work. Tu the only wise God, our Saviour, 
be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever,-* 

.lOB GOODMAN. 

Samuel Bvxto^j, Clerk. 



i) 



A LIST OF MINISTERS, 


DELEGATES, & 


C. 








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bounties and Churches. 


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a— Bladen, 
Beaver Dam. 


\ By letter. 






o 


71 


S2 


SI 


2— Bladen, 


Job Goodmas, 






















Big- Swamp. 


J. Griffin. 


6 




28 




1 




1 


39 


2 


2 1^ 


3 — Brunswick, 


Absalom Robbius, 






















Lockwood's Folly. 


Joel Bobbins. 


2 


1 


2 




1 




1 


41 


2 


4 


4 — Bladen, 
























Walker's Bluff. 


Jonathan Bryant. 


1 




5 






5 


o 


2.5 


1 50 




5 — Columbus, 


EzL. Bryant, 






















White Marsh. 


Jon. Bobbins. 


5 


28 






2 




1 


61 


2 




6 — Columbus, 


Isaac Etherage, 






















Seven Creeks, 


M. Long. 














1 


52 


3 




7 — Cumberland, 


Joseph Thyms, 






















Cape'Fear, 


J. Simms. 


3 


o 


9 


1 


3 


4 


o 


188 


2 50 


s 


8— Duplin, 
























Bear Marsh. 


Allen Moaniss. 






5 










52 


1 50 




9— Duplin, 
























Muddy Creek. 


John Brookes. 


2 












1 


48 


1 50 


40 


10— Duplin, 


James Rapheild, 






















Limestone. 


Jno. Wilkinson. 


1 


1 












27 


1 50 




11 — Duplin, 


Jno. Thomas, 






















Nahong-o. 


Benjamin Best, 






4 






1 




22 


3 




12— Duplin, 
























Island Creek. 


Amos Shuffle. 


2 










1 


1 


31 


1 50 




13 — New Hanover, 


William Wells, 






















Bull Tail. 


Samuel Buxton. 






5 




2 


8 


1 


76 


3 20 




14 — New Hanover, 
Wilmington. 


^ By letter. 








1 






1 


22 


1 50 




15 — New Hanover, 
























Maple Hill. 


Samuel Stuckey. 




1 


1 










29 


1 




16 — Onslow, 
South-West. 


^ By letter. 


1 


1 












44 


1 50 




17 — Onslow, 
























Yopes' Meet'g House. 


J. Lipsey. 




1 




1 


1 






86 


3 




18— Robeson, 


F L. Haynes, 






















Ash Pole. 


Jno. Barns. 


5 




1 




2 




2 


59 


2 


10 ^ 


19 — Robeson, 
























"Saddle Tree. 


Jesse Thomas. 


5 






1 








58 


1 50 


2 


20— Robeson, 
























Bear Swamp. 


Zaban Davis. 














1 


29 


2 


2 


^1 — Sampson, 
























Mingo. 


Henry Pitman. 


2 


1 


4 






2 




38 






22 — Sampson, 


Arthur Brown, 






















Cohary. 


J. Holly. 


2 






6 




2 


3 


131 


2 60 




23 — Sampson, 


William Lay ton. 






















Seven Miles. 


Fehx Bass. 


5 




3 








1 


48 


1 




24 — Sampson, 


David Cornega, 






















Beaulah. 


Robert Bird. 


2 






3 




1 


2 


52, 


2 50 




"25 — Sampson, 
























Hornets Meet. House. 


kom Jackson. 


1 








1 




2 


_ 20 


75 


4 


26 — Onslow, 
























Maple Run. 


Benjamin Johnston. 


1 








1 


1 




29 


1 




27_Wayne, 
























Thunder Swamp. 


Jethro Oats. 






1 








2 


55 


1 




28 — New Hanover, 


James Larkins, 






















Riley's Creek. 


Benjamin Larkins. 


1 


1 








1 


1 


20 


2 


55 


29 — Sampson, 






















JJew Hope. John Carrell. 


48 


.38 


68 


13 


14 


26 




12 


1 55 




Toiai. 


31 


1476 


51 55 


27 29 



'TES - •••■ 

OF THE CxiPE-FEAll BAPTIST ASSOCIATIO>^^ 

Convened in Duplin Cojnifi/, Limestone,^ Meeting ,iJom"e, 
Saliirday, October 3, 1818. 

To wliicli is added, an Address instead of tiie Circular Letter, 

TOGETHER WITH A M3T OF THE , 

Ministers ami Delegates from Ticenty-J^'^ine Churches..- 



TIIE introductory sermon was delivered, in order, bj Elder David Thyjis, 
to a lar^e and attentive assembly, fioiu tlie Sccoial Epistle of Timothijy 
Chapter II. and l;5th verse —'• -S'/z/f/// to shew thiif^elf ajiprovcd unto God, a 
tvoykinan that needetk not to be ai^han.ed, rigidly dii'idhig the iv'ord of •truth.'* 
The congres^ation were attentive, and the preachei- '/.ealously enj^aged ; from 
•which we hope a divine blessing will follow. After service was over, iiiu 
association convened and proceeded to business. 

1. Elder McRRiss prayed; then the list was called; a majority bein<-; 
presont, Elder ,Tob Goodman, was chosen Moderator, and Brother Samuel 
Buxton, Clerk. 

2. Then appointed Brethren Oats, Thomas and Oliver, as a committee of 
finance, to receive the contributions, to make settlements, and report. 

3. Then the letters from the several churches were handed in and read, 
delegates names enrolled, and contributions received, a statement of which 
will be hereunto annexed. 

4. Visitinw brethren from sister assaciations were invited to take seats witli 
us, who cordially came forward. Elder Koonce, from Nues association, pre- 
sented his letter, and some copies of their minutes, which was gratefully 
received ; and B. J. Stevenson, from Raleigh association, gratefully received. 

5. Then appoint brethren to write and go to the sister associations — Elder 
Goodman to write the letter to Cliarlestown association, and be a delegate 
also : Elder Williams to be a delegate to Nues association, and to write tho 
letter; Brother John Oliver, to write to Raleigh association. Elder JFells to 
be the delegate and bear the letter. 

6. Then our circular letter for tliis year was called for; but Elder EtheragCf 
who was to prepare it, not being present, Elder Jilorriss Was requested to 
write an address in favor of the missionary schetne, Viho cordially agreed so 
to do^^ — a copy of which you will see hereunto annexed. 

7. Then received from our con;esponding secretary, Brother Charle' 
M'Allester, several copies from the missionary board, which we gratefull 
received ; anu then, with som-i c'hcr copies from our si'itcr n?"ocistion9, wr 
distributed in order. ' . 



8. Then requested Elder David Thyms to write our ciicular letter for 
iiexf year. 

9. Then appointed brethren to preach to-ninrrow — Elders 3Inrriss, ICoonce 
and Goodman. Elder Jlurriss for to preach first ; Elder Goodman to follow 
r.cxt after; Elder Aooncf to conclude — allowing twenty-five minutes inter- 
niii*sion for collection to the missionary scheme. Preaching to commence at 
ten o'clock, Then adjourned until Monday, ten o'clock. Elder Koonce 
prajed. 

LOIIB'S DAY. 

The brethren appointed to preach to-dav, meet a very large and extensive 
congrejijation, who Jippcared, more than commim, roinposed. Elder Mavriss^ 
agrccal.le to appointment, iirst on the stap;e. preaclied from lleatiteronowt/, 
XXXII. Chapter, and 9th and 10th verses — ^^ For the Lord''s jMmion is his 
yecfle : Jacob is the tot of his inheritimcc ; lie found him in a desert, land, 
mid in a xvaste hoivling icilderness : he led him aboid^ he insfriicUd him, he 
kept him as the apple of his eije.''^ Then followed Elder Goodman, who 
preached from St. JJ'ark, XII. Chapter, and 15th verse— -" .^^tzcZ /e said unto 
' ihem, g-o ije into alt the world, and preach the gospel to every creature.'' — 
Then the intermission took place, and a collection made from a liberal assem- 
bly.- Then Elder Koonce, upon the stage, preached from Hevelations, XXII. 
Chaptei', and 14th verse — " Blessed are they that do his commandments, that 
they may have ri^ht to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gate into 
the city.'' From the zeal of the preachers, and the attention of the people, 
we hope a divine blessing will follow. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 5. 

10. Meet from adjournment. Elder TVells prayed. Then the correspond- 
ing letters were handed in, which were read and approved of. Then the 
congrejiation called for the Moderator, Elder Goodman, to preach to them, 
who duly submitted to their request. Then Brother Charles il'Allester was 
appointed moderator pro tern, who signed the letters of correspondence with 
the clei k. 

11. Then the cleik was. directed to have five hundred copies of these, 
minutes printed, and do in the f(illo\ving manner with tliem — Fifty minutes 
for to send abroad to sister associations : the rest to he distributed, viz : — 
The churclies in Cundierland; Sampson, Mingo-; Rol»es(m, Ash Pole ; Robe- 
son, Saddle Tree; Bladen, Big Swamp; Bladen, Beaver Dam — are to re- • 
c^ive their minutes through Brother Charh'S iM'Allester, which are to be 

>acked and left in oiSce, in \Vi!min!;;ton ; and the other churches are W 
pply for themselves, at the said printing oflice, in ^Vilmington: 

12. Then ordered, that our next association be in ^^'ayI1e county, Thunder 
V -'mp Meeting House, to commence on Saturdaj' before the nist Lord's Day 

October, 1819. Elder Goodman to preach the introdactc:y sermon — ia 
of failurcj Elder TFells. 



3 



IS. Be it remenibered, that tills association redii-n thcii- unfeij^ned iltaiiks 
to th^ inhabitants of Limestone, for their kind dealings to this associatitjii, 
and ioreignei-s in general. 

14. Tlien came forward the connmittee of finance with their report, which 
are as follows: 

Received from the churches this year, . - - 

Remaining in the treasury from last year, - - - 



Paid for printing the minutes, - - - - - ' 

Paid the cleik, .,„.---- 

Remaining in the treasury, . - - - - 

Received this year from the churclies for <he missionary scheme, g 19 25 
As the committee did not report the sum of the collection in the congrega- 
tion, none is here. 

15. Then the association adjourned until time and place before in? 
Elder Koonce prayed. 

(Signed) JOB GOODxMAN, Modendo} 

Samuel Buxton, Clerk. 



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THE AJsTJSTEXEB ADDRESS. 

Dearly Beloved Brethrex — We take the iibertj', as an advisary 
counsel, to submit the following brief address to your most earnest con- 
sideration. 

The Lord has constituted us, even us, as stewards in his house and laborers 
in his vineyard. The christian calling is an active and busy state. What 
our hands find to do, shall we not do with our whole miu;ht 2 l^et us look 
abroad, and contemplate the work, the great work, tliat now lies before us. — 
The Lamb that' was once a bleeding spectable on Mount Calvniy, is in a 
■wonderful manner claiming the purchase of his blood, and calling sinners 
home to God. His calls are sounding out through all the earth; the heathen 
lands are becoming his inheritance : the countries that have long been sitting 
in the region and sluulow of death, are now receiving the light of life divine. 
But let us remember, that the Lord ordinarily works by certain means Uti 
accomplish his purposes of niercy towards tlie ciiildren of men. He has.,^ 
therefore, put it into the hearts of many, to engage zi'alou-!y in the promo 
tion of his gospel; and numbers have gone out with a holy zeal, both fro 
Europe and America, to blow the gospel trumpet through the unenlighten 
tribes of India. In Asia, a divine success has followed their labors of " 





• facro—niany of lae Tiaiivcs have hct-n raised from the uead, and are now 
j;wirig ?Jory to Gad. tliat lie has.putit into llie hearts of his poople in distant 
countries, c.v:en in Norfh America, to "O up v/ith the Lord a^^ainst the mighly. 
Is there not ah apporfunity aii()rded us to do soinetliinp; in aid (>f this <i;lorioiis 
nnssionar}^ work ? jVlny we not claim the priviledi^e of having a part in this 
niafter? Is it not our most ardent cry, " Let thy kingdom come?" "What 
could cheer our hearts and refresh our spirits more, than tiie general enlarge- 
ment of Christ's peaceful roi-;n, than to see the prodi^^al return, though with 
i'ear and trembhng, to his father's house ? Why, dear brethren, uhen we 
are even so cold that it appears nothing can warm or move, witness the melt- 
ing ciTcct that the story of the new-born child of God has instantaneously 
nil your soul's. This shews your love, your divine love, for the precious souls 
of poor sinners. It is enough we feel impressed, we feel convinced, that we 
love even the benighted and far distant heathens — But \ww shall we devise a 
plan to aid in so ])iou3 a work.^ It is recommended in the spirit of love, that 
our bi>ethren in the ministry, and other learling members, should zealously 
tirge the general propriet}^ of forming mission societies for this purpose. One 
shijling (which none would feel as a Toss) from each member in your churches, 
sent up to the association for missionary purposes annually, would amount to 
a hcllvJ^.'iTie annual sum — tliere arc also many who are not in our communion, 
that would cheerfully contribute their mite. Finally, brethren, we exhort and 
persuade you to consider these things, and endeavor to send up something, as 
the Lord hath given you ability, to our next annual meeting; and may the 
Lord strengthen your hands and encourage your hearts in tliis and every 
other good word. We have had a season of peace in the saviour of peace, 
during our association ; and we greet all the churches in love, hoping that the 
fellowship of the spirit, and the bond of union and harmony, may ever exist/ 
.amongst the' churches of our adorable Redeemer,— »3.'jieB. 



>fc. *«* ^ 1^, ^ ^^ ia» ^* ^ ^ A ^ <^ .^ A 3V f^, ^^ ^ ,*ft ^ ^ ^ JO.V ,^ ^ 

[Price of Printiiig" five liundrcd copies, Twenty Dollars.] 



•MINUTES 



OF THE 



Cape Fear Baptist Auociatlpn^ 



l^R 



1819. 



OF THE 



^(nv m^pt^$^ m$$^<(i<^ii^^. 



Convened at Thunder Swamp, M, II. October 2d, 1819. 

1. The ijitrodiictory Sermon was delivered a^^reeable to appointment, 
i3y Elder Job Goodman, from Psalm cxxv. 1-2. — "They that trust in 
the Lord shall be as Mount Zion which cannot be removed, but abideth 
forever. As the mountains arc round about Jerusalem, so the Lord is 
round about his people ftom henceforth, even foievcr.'* 

2. Tlie Association assembled. Elder Reaves prayed at the opening of 
business ; and having called over the list a majority being present pro- 
ceeded to elect officers, viz. Elders, Job Goodman Moderator, and Allen 
Morris Clerk, and James Rhafield, Assistant Clerk. 

3. A committee of finance was appointed consisting of brethren, Jona- 
than Thomas, Garrey Toole, William Cox, and Absalom Robbins. 

4." Letters from 29 Churches were read, and their State, with the names 
of the Delegates minuted. Petitionary letters were also handed in, from 
which we find an increase of three Churches since our last. — viz. Burnt- 
Island, Beaver-Dam, (in Columbus) and ;^^e\v-Britain ; X'^ese Churches 
having given satisfactory accounts relative to tlieir faith and order, A\ere 
cordially received into union with the association. Corresponding letters 
were enquired for, one from the Neiise Association was handed in by their 
Messenger, brother Robert Green, with 30 Copies of Minutes. Brother 
Green was invited to a seat with us. 

5. Read a circular from The Baptist-Board of Foreign Missions, and 
proceeded to appoint Brethren to write to Corresponding Associations 
viz. Elder Willicms to the Raleigh, Morris to the Neuse, and Goodma 
to the Charleston. 



6, Appointed Bnetl.ren to pj*each on the Sabbath, and adjourned until 
hionday 10 o'clock, brother Wells closed by prayer. 

7. The preachers selected to occupy the stage, met on Sunday morn- 
ing a numerous audience, and preached from subjects chosen as follows : 
The Rev." Davsd Thames first, from Psalm Ixxiii. and 24. Gt)odman fr-om 
Eph. iv. and 5. Morris from 2 Cor. v. and 20 ; and Bryan from 1 Cor. i. 
30. Many seemed to listen with devout attention, and we trust a bless- 
iifig will follow. A collection for Missionary purposes was taken from 
the congregation on the sabbath. 

8. Monday morning met according to adjournment. Elder Gornto 
prayed and the business proceeded. 

The cis^cular letter written by elder Thames was handed in, i*ead and 
approved — corresponding letters to the different Associations, were also 
read and received, and messengers appointed to bear the letters : namely. 
Brethren, Goodman to the Charleston, Williams to the Raleigh and Wells 
to the Neuse. 

9. Appointed Brother Charles M*Allester to wTits our next circular 
letter. 

10. Made enquiry after churches within the limits of our association, 
which are not in union, with us, with the view of using such measures as 
the spirit of the Gospel dictates to effect a union. — None were discovered. 

11. The clerk was directed to make a statement of the number of or- 
dained and licensed ministers of our order in tlie bounds of the association. 

12. The committee of finance gave in their repoit and were dischad'ged. 

IS. We have agreed to hold our next Associatjion at Nahungain M. H. 
JDuplin, begining Saturday before the first Lord's day in October, 1820. — 
Brother John Gornto, preaches the introductoi*y sermon ; in case of fail- 
ure. Brother Morris preaching to commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

14. Took into con sideriition the subject of the Theological School, com- 
mencing under the care of "the Baptist Board for Foreign Missions," 
wishing knowledge to increase in the churches ; agreed to sanction the 
measure. 

15. Resolved for tlie purpose of regaining the money belonging to this 
association, which lay in the hands of our former Clerk at the time of his 
decease — to a])point brother James Larkins our agent, furnished with the 
power of an attorney from the present clerk. 

16. The clerk is directed in thf^se min'jtes to mention and explain the 
error in the report of the last year's minutes. 

17. liesolved, That 500 copies of these minutes be rnnted and deposit- 
ed as follows: — viz. in Fayettevilie, Whitcville, at Sampson C. K. and 
Limestone. 



S 54 


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IS. The thanks of the Association are" tendered to the citizens of the 
neighborhood, for their friendsliip and hospitality during the Session. 

Concluded with prayer by brother Morris. 

Report of the Committee of Finance. 

Received from the Churches for the Association, Fund 

Remaining in Treasury, 



Paid for Printing last years Minutes 

the Clerk for his services, 

Elder We'!s for attending the Raleigh Association 

Elder Williams for ditto, the Neuse do. 



Received from the Churches for Missionary purposes, Si 3 
From the Congregation on Sunday - - - t20 80 
the Black people in favor of the African, Mission 3 16 1-4 

g36 96 1-4 

* The Churches would do well to observe, that although this sum 
stands on ourMintues, yet it is not at present in the hands of any officer 
in the Association as may be understood by number the 15th, of these Mi- 
nutes ; hence our present funds are extremely low. 

f It should be here remarked, that it was an oversight in our clerk of 
1818, tliat the contribation of the sabbath was not accuraely stated. The 
reader must threfore, be referred to the Minutes of" The North-Caioliua 
Baptist Society for Foreign Missions, for 1819; wliere t!ie subject ex- 
plains itself, the collection having been carried u;j by our Secretary. — ■ 
viz. liy Charles M-Allester, from the Cape Fear Association. 

S47 63 ■ 

Now 19 25, taken from Ig47 63 

Leaves 28 38, which was the amount of the Pul»lic Contribution on 
the Sabbath. 



The Circular Letter. 

THiS Cape-Fear Baptist Association to the respective Churches she 
represents, sendeth Christian salutation. 

Dearly beloved brethren from general observation, we perceive an evil 
that prevails much in our country, neighborhoods and families, and that 
measurably for want of a careful discharge of our own duty, as pro- 
fessing Christians and Parents. This evil consists of the ill habits which 
at present so much predominate amongst our youth. Hence we call 
your attention to the obligation of parents to their children. The want 
of timely and suitable instruction as regards the youthful mind, often stabs 
the parent's heart, and leads him loaded with shame and sorrow to the 
grave. We are certainly ^first bound to secure to our children the common 
necessaries of life, by the assistance of divine Providence, otherwise wo 
might be called infidels, or those who have denied tlie faith. It is also 
our duty to use all lawful means to have bur youth well educated ; at the 
same time to endeavor to have the judgment properly directed, in order 
for -their uscfuluess in society. 

We also are to conrsider it as a lawful privilege to secure this world's 
goods, fortbe benefit of our rising posterity; not with adesign that they 
may become full, and deny the Lord, or say who is he? but tliat they may 
not be poor arid steal and take his sacred name in vain Prov. xxx 8, 9. 

The above duties having been noticed, we take into consideration 
something of more solemn importance; that is the ca erlasting happiness 
of the soul. True it is, we can do notliing whicli will essentially recom- 
mend ihem to the divine favour ,* yet we are bound by the word of God 
to use certain means, in tlie pursuance of which we discharge our duty, 
obey the holy precepts, and admonition of scripture; and may with an 
humble confidence look for a blessing to descend in due season, on our 
growing youth. Brii.g up your children in the nurture and admonition 
of the Lord, not by having them brought within the pales of a church by 
baptism or sprinkling, before their heai-ts are changed by grace divine : 
but by both precept and example, for a word in season to the tender un- 
biased mind, how good it is! often producing results of immortal advan- 
tage ; though perliaps often, years after the pious pai'cnt has forgot tlie 
labors of his guardianship below. 

Unnecessary visiting, and idle roving from house to house on the sab- 
bath, are fraught with danger and ill consequences. Trifling sports, and 
sinful amusements on that holy day, ill befit creatures that must shortly 
enter on a delightful sabbath of eternal rest, or bear the resentful venge- 
ance of Him who hath sanctified the sabbath for his o\mi worship. 



©oil has nowhere promised to meet with, and bless those who assem- 
ble for the purpose of canting to the sound of the viol in^a way of civil 
mirth, as it is crlled by the worlding. Oh ! how bewitching, how en^ 
snaring and alluring is this great enemy, to serious reflection, and religi- 
ous thought ! Let parents weigh their charge with solemn care, and let 
the youthful mind be rather directed to the word of God which is a per- 
fect guide in all religious matters, and able to make the young as well as 
the old wise unto salvation. By reading the scriptures our children will 
discover at an early period the necessity of setting apart one day in seven, 
for the service of the most high. 

It is also important that the youth should attend the preaching of the gos- 
pel, with such behavior as becomes the worshipers of God. Let children 
likewise be taught the use, and great necessity of fervent prayer to God 
for the remission of sin, and a blessing through Christ. This duty should 
be strongly impressed on the mind by our own particular example as 
Christian parents and heads of families. 

"When we neglect the several duties which hav€ just been stated, we 
disgrace ourselves, as professing parents; neglect the interest of our chil- 
dren, and disobey the commands of the LoihI of the Sabbath. On the other 
hand when we strictly attend to these duties, we honour the father of our 
spirits, prove ornamental to the cause of Godliness, and possess an in- 
ward peace which the careless parent knows not: we also have the com-^ 
fortable promise of the Lord, that his blessing will attend us, for he 
gives grace and glory ; and no good thing will he withhold from them 
that walk uprightly. 

May the Lord give you understanding in all things, and grace suffici- 
ent for all your duties, Amen. 



JOB GOODMAN, Moderator, 
ALLEN MORRIS, Clerk, 



COUNTIES AND 
CHURCHES. 



DELEGATES. 



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PSON. 



1 Mingo, 5 ^^"'^iam Layton, Wm. Jackson, 

2 Cohari, \ Oarry Tooie, J. Stepheils, 

3 Seven Miles, \ Wm. Sinith, A B-nton, 



4 Beaulap, 

5 llor. x>l.Hous.- 

6 New-Hope, 

DlIPLIN. 



Robert Byrd, V. Vann, 

Andrew Bass, 

J. Carrol, J. Chesnut, 



7 Bear Marsh, 

8 Muddy Creek 

9 Lime stone, 
10 Nahiinga, 



A. Morris, J. Goodson, 

0. Baffin, J. Brooks, 

Jacob Wiliirans, James Rhafield. 

J. Thomas, H. Best, 

11 Island Creek, ^ R. Chasen, Wm. Ge .rge, 

Robeson. 

12 Aslipole, ^ Jesse Pitman, • 

13 Saddle Tree, C Jesse Thomas, 

14 Bear Swamp, \ L. Thompson, B. Watson, 

15 Burnt Island, (^ J. Freeman, J. Little, 

" New-Hanover, 

16 Bull Tail, <^ .fohn Buxton, E. Herring, 
n Wilmington, K John Picket, 

18 Maple Hill, I S. Stuekey, Stephen Wood, 

19 Riley's Creeks (^ A. Morgan, James Larkins, 

Bladen. 

20 Beaver Dam, C David Thames, 

21 Big Swamp, } Job Goodman. D. Coleman, 

22 Waaler's BlufF \_ No Representative. 

Onslow. 

23 South West, C" Jesse Webh, J. Langlev, 

24 Yeope's M. H. { John Gornto, D. Nixon, 

25 Chapel Run, [ William Cox, B. Johnson, 

CoLUMUUS. 



26 White Marsh, 

27 Seven Creeks, 
8 Beaver Dam, 

' New Britain, 

^IIUNSWICK. 

>iill Creek. 



E. Biyan, B. Saucer, 
Bryau Goss, 

Represented by Letter. 

Do. do. 



<J J. Reaves, A. Robbiiis, 

S C. M'AIIester, J. M'Daniel, 



MBERLAND 

_'e-Fear, 

YNE. 

>wamp, { Jethro Oates, L. Roiise, 



62110 



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136 

'51 

50 

20 

15 



43 
46 
31 
21 



62 
39 
26 
22 



70 
25 
26 
22 



64 

42 



44 
77 
40 



11121 



35 



'54 
57 
20 
11 



42 



186 



49 



100 

205 

150 

200 

70 

100 



200 
150 
150 
300 
150 



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200 
150 
100 
200 



1300 
200 
100 
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150 

200 



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300 
125 



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1435 



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'Vo have within the limits oi' tiiis Association 17 Ojidained Preachers, and 



OF THK 

CAPE-FEAR 
BAPTIST ASSOCMTTOJS*, 

ASSEMBLED AT 

- NAHUNGA MEETING-HOUSE, 

DUPLIJ>r COUJ>rTr, JSrORTH-CAROLLYA, 

SEPTEMBER 30, 182a 

RALEIGH: 

FRINTED BY J. GAIiES. 

1820. 



MINUTES 



CAPE-FEAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION- 



1. The introductory Sermon, according to ap- 
pointment, was delivered by Elder John Gornto, 
from Acts IX. 20. ** And straightway he preached 
Christ in the Synagogues, that he is the Son of 
God." 

2. The Delegates met in an associated capacity : 
a majority being present, proceeded to elect officers, 
viz: Elders Job Goorlman, Moderator, and A. 
Morris, Clerk, and Brother Rhafield, Assistant. 
Elder Morris prayed at the opening of business. 

3. A committee of finance was appointed, con- 
sisting of Brethren John Oliver and James Mathis. 

4. Then read tne letters from the various 
Churches which formed the Associations, took an 
account of their state, and enrolled the names of the 
Delegates. 

5. Read a corresponding letter from the Neuse 
Association, accompanied with a packet ot minutes, 
and welcomed her messenger, Brother Keaton, to a 
seat ; also invited Brother Reaves, a messenger 
from the Charleston Association, to sit with us. 

6. Attended to Brother Larkins's report, to-wit : 
That he had acted agreeably to his appoiniment in 
last year's minutes ; had collecied thirteen dollars, 
which was handed in to the clerk ; and has the 
prospect of hereafter collecting most of the monies 
remaining, though some he expects will be lost. 
Brother Larkins was dismissed, with the thanks of 
the Association. 



7* Read and approved of the circular letter; but 
au horized the Clerk to inspect it carefully, and 
make such small alterations as he might deem ne- 
cessary. 

8. Read an address from " The Board of Mana- 
gers of the Baptist General Convention in the Uni- 
ted States." Referred the matter to further consi- 
deration. 

9. Having had no communications for some time 
from the Raleigh Association, agreed for the pre- 
sent to suspend our correspondence with that body, 
and proceeded to appoint Brother Enoch Herring 
to write to the Nf use and Brother Morris to the 
Charleston Associations. 

10. Nominated Preachers to fill the stage on the 
Sabbath, and adjourned until Monday, 10 o'clock. 
Elder Reaves prayed. 

11. The Preachers appointed to the stage met on 
the Sabbath morning a large and serious congrega- 
tion, and proceeded to preach from subjects as fol- 
low: Elder David Thames, Isa. LV. verses from 
1 to 3, inclusive ; Elder Goodman, John V. 39 ; 
and Elder Reaves, Matt. XI. 28, 29, 30. The 
Preachers appeared devoutly engaged, and we trust 
the Lord will not suffer his word to return void. 

12. Monday morning met pursuant to adjourn- 
ment. Elder Johnston prayed. Proceeded to ap- 
point Elders Goodman and Reaves Messengers to 
the Charleston Association, and Elder Gornto to 
the Neuse. 

13. Elder Jonathan Bryan is appointed to write 
our next Circular, on a subject of his own choice. 

14. Agreed that our next Association be held 
at Ryley's Creek, New-Hanover county, commen- 
cing Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 
3821. 

15. App'MUted Elder Job Goodman to preach the 
introductory Sermon, in case of the iai ure of Elder 
E. B.yan. Service to begin at 10 o' l-.ik, A. M. 

16. The Committee of Finance gave in their re- 
port, and was discharged, 



17. Read an Address from the sixth annual report 
of the Baptist Board for Foreign Missions, and 
agreed to request our Corresponding Secretary to 
write to the Board, representing our present situa- 
tion with regard to ability, &c. and that we wish 
the small mite we do send up to be appropriated to 
the use of Foreign Missions. 

18. Agreed to have 500 copies of these minutes 
printed at Raleigh, and distributed from thence^ 

19. Resolved^ That it be the duty of Ministers 
and leading Members, if circumstances so require, 
to read the minutes, or any interesting parts of them, 
in full congregations, soon after they come to hand, 
for the purpose of diffusing the information they 
contain in a more general way. 

20. The Association express a sense of gratitude 
to the inhabitants of the place, for the kindness and 
hospitality experienced during the session. Ad- 
journed to place and time appointed. Prayer by 
Brother Wells. 

JOB GOODiMAN, Moderator. 

Allen Morris, Clerk. 



Report of the Committee of Finance- 

R.eceived from the Churches for the A. F. - §46 30 

Remaining in Treasury, - - - 112 20 

158 50 
Paid for printing last year';- m'nutes, - %15 
■ the Clerk for his services, - - 14 
Elder Goodman for attending the Charles- 
ton Association, - - - _ 7 

G — 36 CO 



S122 50 



Received from the Churches for Missionary pur- 
poses, - - - - - - 10 28f 

From the congregation, - - - 3 5i| 

S13 80 

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THE CIRCULAR LETTER. . -.. \ 

Dear BRETHiijiNj * •' '; ' % ' 

Permitted again t,o meet in an Association, • 
we again send you a circular AddreSsi Apd, as it 
is one of the principal designs t>f this kind of com- 
munication to urge truths which are not deemed 
very expedient for Preachers much to insist on, .we ■; 
enter in plain and friendly terms on the subject''of 
the support of the Gospel ministry. 

Since we profess to advert to Scripture for infor- 
mation on all matters relative both to faith and 
practice, hence " to the law and to the testimony" 
on this subject. An Apostle, who was divinely in- 
spired to treat on this point of Christian duty, ar- 
gues with evidences drawn from various sources. 

1. " Who goeth a warfare at his own charges?" 
As much as to say, who, as a soldier,-sustains the fa- 
tigues of domestic preparations, the hardships of 
tedious marches, the peril and danger of the stormy 
field of battlt;, at his own charges ? 

Or who, as a minister of the Gospel, in an emi- 
nent sense, called forth to fight the battles of the 
Lord, acquits himself at home by preparatory exer- 
tions, and in the Church by public ministrations, all 
at his own charges ? None according to Scripture, 
because the Lord hath ordained that they who preach 
the Gospel should live of the Gospel. 

2. " Who planteth a vineyard and eateth not of the 
fruit thereof:" It requires labour and attention, af- 
ter a vineyard is planted, to cultivate, prune, and 
keep it in order. Or, " who feedeth a flock, and eat- 
eth not of the milk of the flock ?" Shall the kind so- 
licitude of the shepherd who is wearied with fatigue 
and watching be thus requited ? No, for the admo- 
nition in another place follows, " Let him that is 
taught in the word communicate to him that teach- 
eth in all good things."— ^yfe- 1st CVr. ixt 7, 11.— ■ 
Gah vi. 6. 



9 



Leaving these passages for your own fur-ther illus- 
tration, we proceed to reason from analogy. Every 
laudable and valuable institution ought to be support- 
ed. The Gospel, of all institutions, is most import- 
ant, laudable and valuable ; therefore the Gospel 
ought to be supported. As Christians we profess 
religion to be our great concern ; that we desire 
the sincere milk of the word for our spiritual growth, 
that we have given ourselves to the Lord, and to his 
service, to be supported by his power and grace. 
Let us think on these things. 

Again. Service naturally demands remuneration, 
divine as well as human, public as well as private. 
"We shall here insert a few remarks which, perhaps, 
may with safety be impressed on the minds of every 
thinking Christian ; namely, that man who preaches 
for money, and not for the glory of God and the good 
of souls, deserves no encouragement. On the other 
hand, that people who are able to support and yet 
neglect the faithful and laborious minister of the 
sanctuary, deserve that the Gospel should be taken 
from them and given to those who are willing to shew 
their esteem and value for it, by attention paid to 
their preachers. And that preacher who is not 
worth supporting is not worth hearing. Indeed, the 
conduct of those v,ho withhold their suitable aid and 
assistance, is at least a tacit declaration that the 
preacher is beneath their notice in this respect. 

Perhaps the question may now arise, what method 
should be adopted to improve the present imperfect 
state of this matter ? We would first observe, that 
Christianity, with regard to this dutv, would be in 
better credit in many places, were the thing entirely 
laid aside, rather than conducted as it is. For there 
is in many instances a remissness, fraught with so 
much careless neglect, that it looks to indifferent 
persons as if we were reserving our punctuality for 
other purposes. This, brethren, often injures the 
cause of vital godliness, as well as the support of 
the Gospel ; it manifests sugh a disregard to a known 



10 

and scriptural duty, and exhibits such an unfavora- 
ble trait in character, with respect to firmness and 
some other virtues, that the enemy of the christian 
cause has too much reason to indulge his censures. 

To encourage a union for the support of the mi- 
nistry, between professors and non-professors, has 
to some seemed inconsistent with the independent 
spirit or nature of the christian religion. Now if it 
should be found, on m.ature consideration, that tl>e 
Gospel has no salutary efTects on society at large ; 
or that it has no friends except visible members; 
or that the support of religious worship, at a very 
early period, did not depend on the whole congrega- 
gation instead of a partial few of the most devotion- 
al ; or that the Lord does not justly allow the earth 
whose fulness is his, often to help the woman ; we 
will admit the propriety of the objection. But under 
present existing circumstances, we are authorised to 
recommend it as a duty, as well as a privilege, to all 
congregations favored with the extensive benefits of 
the Gospel, to contribute to its 'support ; and few 
gentlemen capable of serious reflection would be 
found slack were the duty decently proposed. 

Prudently to manage this important duty, churches 
in the choice of deacons and others to superintend 
the thing, should ever have before them the direc- 
tion that Paul gave to Timothy; where the young 
preacher is instructed that the deacons must not be 
double-tongued, saying or signifying one thing and 
doing another. Not greedy of filthy lucre, least 
their pernicious example should injure tlie cause 
they were intended to support and encourage ; but 
^uch as hold the mystery of the faith in a pure con- 
science ; and how can those who are negligent in 
their office possess consciences acquitted and pure ? 

We are, perhaps, brethren, too easily tempted to 
look on christian liberality, as a mere wastt^ of mo- 
nev, and why ? Because we expect our pastors to 
lab'ur for us, whether paid or not. But under these 
discouraging circumstances, some of us have had to 



11 

mourn the loss of the light in the golden candlestick ; 
and no wonder, for if poor minist' rs are neglected, 
it most ctrtainly behoves them to look for that place 
where they may, with most ease, support their fa- 
milies, and devote the more time to religious im- 
provement. The disrespect shewn to those who la- 
bour in the Gospel harvest in numerous instances, 
ought to be considered as a sin of omission of which 
we should divest ourselves as soon as possible ; we 
have not the infirmity of nature to plead as an apo- 
logy in its favour, as may be the case in some other 
failings ; but the covetousness of nature, and cold- 
ness of affection towards the men whom we out- 
wardly profess to esteem, are too manifest. 

Hence, some of our pastors are driven to merchan- 
dize, some to poor pitiful speculations of some kind 
or other, and some are driven out of the country. 
It is inconceiveable how much a proper discharge of 
dut\ on the part of churches and people, would 
strengthen the hands, and encourage the hearts of 
the true heralds of the gospel. Who knows how 
much the cold reception we often give them tends 
to quench the spirit, and retard their laborious zeal ! 
After all that can be dictated by contracted igno- 
rance, these remarks are not founded in fiction. 

Were deacons, and leading members who are 
sometimes appointed to attend to this business, to 
step forward with a manly behaviour, fortified with 
a true sense of their duty, and the importance of the 
subject ; there would very soon be little cause to 
complain for want of means in most of our congre- 
gations. 

Brethren, let us be alive to our duty, and diligent- 
ly pursue what our hand finds to do ; there is no 
work to be done in the grave whither we are all has- 
tening on the rapid wheels of time. Seethe change* 
of things, observe the confusion of human affairs ; 
is there not a cause ? Perhaps in the bosom of a 
cloud of guilty deeds, the hire of the labourer, which 
has unjustly been kept back, has entered the ear of 



12 

the Lord of Hosts, and he is now answering us ac- 
cordnig to our folly. Observe the prodigality of 
the times ; the gold which has been laid up by co- 
vetous men is cankering fast Why has not more 
been thrown into the treasury of the Lord ? As living 
members of the body of Christ, let us be doers of the 
word, and not hearers only. The chief shepherd will 
at length make his appearance, and how shall we abide 
his coming. How have we treated that character 
which was originally sent forth without purse, with- 
out scrip, and with but one coat, wilh the assurance 
that the workman is worthy of his hire ? O ! may 
our lamps be burning bright at that hour ! May 
we be in readiness to join the associated assembly 
above, where all is perfection, peace, joy and love! 
May the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with 
you all. Yours, in gospel bonds. Amen. 

JOB GOODMAN, Moderator, 
Allen Morris, Clerk* 



i 



mas5tiripiiii 



CAPE-FEAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 



ASSEMBLED AT 



Eiley^s Creek, JSTew-Hanover Co^inty, JV*. C* 



OCTOBER 6, 1821. 



>3iKHKKM< 



RALEIGH : • 

PRINTED BT J. GALES. 

1821. 

« 



% 



■4 



MINUTES, ^c. 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1821. 

1. The introductory sermon was preached by El- 
der Job Goodman, from Matt. xii. 53. " Either 
make the tree good, and his fruit good ; or else 
make the tree corrupt, and his fruit corrupt." 

2. Met in Association. Brother Williams prayed. 
A majority of the Churches being represented, pro- 
ceeded to elect officers, viz. Brother Job Goodman, 
Moderator, and brother Allen Morris Clerk? who 
called as assistant Clerk, brother Rhafield. 

3. Proceeded to appoint a committee of finance, 
consisting of brethren Garry Toole, James Mathis, 
and George Fennel. 

4. Read the Church letters, enrolled tho^names of 
the Messengers, and minuted the state of the 
Churches. 

5. Enquired for corresponding brethren. Brother 
Keaton, from the Neuse Association, was present, 
with a letter and packet of Minutes, which were 
thankfully received. Brother Reaves was bearer of 
a letter and packet from the Charleston Association; 
but the letter and Minutes being dated tvvo years 
backj left us utterly at a loss how to correspond with 
that respectable body, the present year, not knowing 
where they meet. 

6. The Circular Letter written by brother Jona- 
than Bryim was read and referred to a committee, 
consisting of brethren Williams, Morris, Toole and 
Fennell, for further consideration, &c. 

T' Received from the Cape-Fear Church a packet 
of the Minutes of the North Carolina Baptist Soci- 
ety for Foreign and Domestic Missions. 



4 



8' The Assistant Clerk read an Address from 
" The Board of Managers of the Baptist General 
Convention, in the United States." 

9. Appointed brother Williams to write a Letter 
of Correspondence to Neise Association. The said 
brother also to bear the letter as our messenger to 
that body. 

10. Appointed brother George Fennell to write 
our next Circular Letter 

11. Nominated Preachers to occupy the Stage on 
the Lord's Day, viz. Elders Goodman, E. Bryan 
and Morris, and adjourned to INIonday, 10 o'clock, 
A. M. Prayer by brother Morris. 

Sabbath Morning, at 11 o'clock, according to ap- 
pointment, the Preachers in nomination ascended 
the Stagc^. Elder Bryan preached from Rt-v. xi. 1. 
Elder Goodman from Micah vi. 6, 7, 8. and Elder 
Morris from Deut. xxxii. 10, Notwithstandiig the 
unpleasantness of the weather, the people seemed 
orderly and serious, and we pray the blessing of 
Zion*s King to follow the labours of the day. 

MONDAY. 

1. Met sgreeably to adjournment. Prayer by 
Brother Heaves. 

2. Read and received the letter written to Neuse 
Association. 

3. The Committee appointed to examine the Cir- 
cu;.tr, rcportfd, " That having duly considered the 
subject, it is their opinion that the Clerk have li- 
bi rty to makt such alterations or corrections, as he 
may dtem expedient. 

4. Broiht-r Jam^^s Larkins then gave in his report 
as agent in bertalf of the Association. He reported 
that fifty-four dollars and twenty cents was all that 
could btr coliected. of the arrears of the Association 
fund, uithout distn-ssing the poor, &c. The Asso- 
ciation ccrdially icqnir^sccd in the report, and dis- 
charged brother Larkins with the gratitude of our 



J- 
body. The above sum was accordingly paid over 
to the Clerk. 

5. Resolved, that brother James Rhafield have for 
his services as Assistant Clerk, five dollars, which 
was accordingly paid to him by the committee of 
finance. 

6. Resolved to set apart the first Thursday in 
March next, as a day of humiliation and prayer to 
Almighty God, for his blessings on our land, and 
for the out-pouring of his spirit on the Churches ; 
for surely we are threatened in many places, with at 
least a partial famine, with regard both to temporal 
and spiritual nourishment;. Agreed also to sanctify 
the first Thursday in next September, as a day of 
thanksgiving, or humiliHtion as the providences of 
God among us, may seem to demand. 

7. Agreed that the Minutes be printed at Ra- 
leigh ; and the distribution made as formerly. 

8. Appointed brethren Mathis, Toole, and Gavin, 
in conjunction with the Clerk, to correct the report 
of the committee of finance, relative to the loss 
which was sustained by the death of the former 
Clerk. Also to devise some suitable method for the 
safe-keeping of the Association fund. 

9. Appointed our next Association at South West, 
to commence Saturday belore the first Sabbath in 
October, 1822. Elder Solomon Reaves to preach 
the introductory sermon, in case of failure. Elder 
Morris. Preaching to begin at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

10. The committee of finance gave in their report 
and was discharged. 

11- Resolved that this Association express a sense 
of gratitude to the inhabitants of this place, for their 
kindness during the session. Adjourned to time 
and place appointed. Pravf r bv brother Thomas. 
JOB GOODMAN, Moderator. 

Allen Morris, Clerk. 



6 
< '^ 

Report of the Committee of Finance^ corrected. 
1819. 
Received from the Churches for the 

Association fund, , S54) 05 

Paid Elder William Wells for visiting 

Raii-igh Association, S7 

Paid E.dei Jacob Williams for visicing 

Neuse Association, 3—10 



S44 05 



1820. 
Received from the Churches for the 

Association Fund, 46 30 

From brother James Larkins, agent for 

Cape-Fear Association, 13 

gl03 35 
Paid for printing last j-ear's Minutes, %\5 
Paid the Clerk lor his services 14 

Paid Elder Job Goodman for visiting 

Charleston Association, ^ 7 — 36 



^67 2>5 



1821. 
Received from the Churches for the 

Association Fund, 42 01^ 

From brother J. Larkins, agent, 54 20 

. * S163 5H 

P^id for printing last yearns Minutes, 1S15 
Pr.id the Clerk for his services, 14 

Paid A-sistant Cierk, 5 

Paid Elder Job Goodman for visiting 

Charleston Association, 10 

Paid Elder Gornto for visiting Neuse 

Association, 8 — 52 

gill 5Qi^ 
ALLEN MORRIS, 
E. C. GAVIN, 
JAMES MATHIS, 



CHURCHES. 



DELEGATES. 



"Mingo, 
Coharai, 

Seven Mile, 

Beaulah, 
Hornet M. H. 
.New-Hope, 
Bear Marsh, 

Muddy Creek, 

Limestone, 

Nahiinga, 
^Island Ci'eek, 

s Ashe Pole, 
P 

J <| Saddle Tree, 

o Bear Swamp, 

l^Burnt Island, 

'"bhII Tail, 

A^'ilmington, 

Maple Hill, 



in 






j Riley's Creek, 

^Beaver Dam, 

Big- Swamp, 

Walker's Bluff 

^ fs. West 
J2 J Yeope's M. H. 
c ( chapel Run, 

s I White Marsh, 
•g J Seven Creeks, 
^ j Beaver Dam, 
^ I New Britain, 

Brunswick County, 
Mill Creek, 

Cumberland Co"ty, 
Cape-Fear, 

Wayne County, 
Thunder Sw'p 



G. Toole, J. Mp.this, 
John Flemming', J 

Woodward, 
Valentine Vann, 

John Can-ol, 
AUen Morris, 
J. Johnston, F. Pic 

ket, 
Jacob Williams, J. 

Rhafield, 
Jonathan Thomas, 
R. Chasin,J Tcachy 
John Pilman, W. 

Thompson, 

C. Pate, J. Holmes, 

Jacob Freeman, 
Gabriel Herring-, G. 

Fennel, 
J. Event, J. Picket, 
S. Stuckey, B. Le- 
noir, 
B. Lai'kins, James 
Kenned)^, 

D. Thomas, S. Cane 
Job Goodman, D. 

Lennon, 
Duncan McKuller, 

John Langle}', 
John Gornto, 
Benjamin Bi'jan, 

E. Bryan, F. Prig-in, 
S. Reaves, W. Haze 



A Robblns, J Reaves 
Shepherd Sowel, 
Lewis Rouse, 






14 



1181 8 



20 



143 



$ C. 

00 



1 00 
1 25 



64 

34; 

21 

17 1 50 

46 1 50 



30 
18 

41 

76 

42 
41 
27 

81 
25 

42 

21 

60 



1 SO 

1 50 

2 00 

1 25 

2 00 
1 50 

1 00 

3 00 
1 00 

1 00 

1 35 

1 00 

2 00 

1 25 

2 00 
2 00 



92 

57 
76 
43 1 00 

541 50 
25 
471 35 



43 

9 174 

2' 47 

4211852 



2 00 
2 00 
1 50 
41.95 



lib m W»^^ 

Three Dollars were received from Cape-Fear Church, for the 

Missionaiy Fxiul. 

In these tl-uity-two CUurches there are about 20 Preachers, in- 
cluding' 2 or 3 coloured Ministers. 



CIRCULAR. 

Beloved Brethren, 

The present annual Address calls your atten- 
tion to the excellence, utility and sublimity of the 
Holy Scriptures. 

1. Relative to the excellence of the Scriptures, it 
may be observed that the Bible, by way of eminence, 
has been called, the Book of Books. The Sacred 
Volume bears a date the most ancient of any Book 
in the world : it has survived the dissolution of 
Empires and Kingdoms, and even been preserved 
while thousands of volumes, laboriously produced 
by the great men of the world, have sunk into obli- 
vion. This solitary Book has sustained the rest of 
sceptic philosophers, and ingenious critics, through 
ages I but like its Great Author, unmoved by the 
foolishness of fools, it remains unchangeably the 
same. We further discover the excellence of the 
S< riptures, in the comprehensive and consistent his- 
tory they contain, of the creation of the universe; 
the existence of the only true God, with angelic na- 
ture, in its high estate, and fallen condition. These 
sacred pages afford us the only true and satisfactory 
accounts of a most just and equitable decision that 
shall be passed on all men at the time appointed by 
the Father. 

The Bible contains, in a manner and style worthy 
of divine inspiration, matter of direction adequate 
to moral duty or moral enquirv, on everv point ne- 
cessary to be understood b\ intelligent men* The 
introduction of sin and thrall, and a most glorious 
redemption from this state of wretchedness are here 



9 ^ 

clearly pointed ouiT These things considered} well 
may we call this an excellent Book. 

2. The utility of the Scriptures is great, whether 
we consider them as a fountain of instruction, or a 
source of consolation. The word of the Lord is a 
fountain of life ; understanding here puts forth her 
voice, in a language persuasive and divine In this 
Book we find a sacred lamp to guide our feet into 
all the paths of duty. 

Are we at a loss respecting what we are bound 
to believe ? Here the whole system of christian 
faith is presented in most brilliant characters. Do 
Vvc halt between two opinions relative to our prac- 
tical duty ? Here we find a " thus saith the Lord," 
in every point that regards the conduct of a christian 
soldier : Hence they who err in the practical duties 
of Christianity, are left without excuse ; for they 
most evidently make void the commandments of 
God, by the tradition of the elders; and instead of 
paying an humble adoration to the injunctions of 
'* Him whose side was pierced for traitors doom to 
fire," they obey, in a certain sense, man rather than 
God. Let professors then look to the proper source 
for that wisdom which is profitable to direct. 

A source of consolation the Scriptures also afford* 
We hear the blessed Saviour speak; "'I will not 
leave you comfortless ; I will come to yoa. And 
if I go and prepare a place for vou, I will come 
again and receive yuu unto myself, that where I am 
ye may be also. In the midst of almost incessant 
storms what joy and rapture are blended in the idea 
of a quick successive calm ? In the height of war, 
carnage, and exertion in the field, how delightful 
to be dismissed from service, and called home to 
rest ? After the toils and cares which the labors of 
the day produce, how welcome is the evening's sweet 
repose ? From these remarks, improved, we draw 
consolation from our christian scriptures. F r, for 
divine consolation " we look not at the things which 



are seen, but (by faith) at the tmngs which are not 
seen ; for wc walk by faith and not by sight. 

3. We next proceerl to shew, that there is a pe- 
culiar sublimity in the Scriptures. Simplicity is ne- 
cessary to give an idea of sublimity. Observe the 
Bible what simplicity — No supcrflui y of expression 
>— no labored style or high sounding language ; but 
all plam and sitrjple to him that hath understanding. 
Like the divine spirit of inspiration, supporting in 
essence, a majestic unity, simplicity and sublimity, 
through the whole. But more particularly, hear 
the inspired instruments while they sing, " He bow- 
ed the heavens also and came down ; and darkness 
was under his feet — He rode upon a cherub and did 
fly ; yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind — 
He made darkiKss his secret place. Before him 
wetu the pestilence, and burning coals went forth at 
his feet. He stood and measured the earth — He be- 
held and drove asunder the nations ; and the ever- 
lasting mountains were scattert d ; ihe perpetual 
hills did bow — His ways are everlasting. Isaiah 
also speakmg of the future glory and prosperity o^ 
the church, says, *' violence shall no mfire be hearr 
in thy land — wasting nor destruction within th) 
borders : but thou shalt call thv walls salvation an' 
thy gates praise. The sun shall be no more thv lighf 
by day ; neither for brighmess shall the moon give 
light unto thee ; hut the Lord shall be unto thee an 
everlasting light, and thy God thy glory. Time 
and the limits of a circular would fail us i?i our at- 
tempts to describe the stvle of our Lord's addresses 
to the people while on eartli — the eloquence which 
made a Felix tremble on the throne, and many other 
passages which undoubtedly excel all human compo- 
sition, [f then the language of the great I AM, af- 
ter passing through frail organs of humanity, be full 
of every thing that is majestic and divine, what kind 
of an idea are we to form of Deiiy ! when he shall 
speak as God and act as God, without regard to that 



condescending mercy which now accommodates it- 
self to our present frail capacity ? 
-^ O let us, in tvery act of devotion, whether public 
or private, remember that our Gc^d is an awful God 
that will not be mocked. Now to the King immor- 
tal, invisible the only wise God, be praise and 
thanksgiving through all the Churches, Amen. 

JOB GOODMAN, Moderator. 
Allen Morris, Clerk. 



msifii^iii© 



OF THE 



CAPE-FExlR BAPTIST ASSOCIATIOlSr, 

, ASSEMBLED AT ' . 

SOUTH WEST MEETING HOUSE, ONSLOW COUNTY, 

October,. 182Z. 



Printed by J. Gales & Son, Raleig'h. 



'm/^^ *^>'-^<^ , 




^v«^-^ 



a-e 



MINUTED. 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5. 

1. The Sermon introductory to business was preached by 
Eldrr Reaves, from 2 Chron. ix, 18, 19 — "And there were 
six steps to the thront," &c. 

2. Met, called the Churches, a large majority answered by 
delegation. Proceeded to elect officers, namely. Brethren 
Goodman. Moderator, Morris, Clerk, and Rhafield, Assistant 
Ckrk. Elder Morris opened the Association by prayer. 

3. Appointed a Committee of Finance, consisting of Bre- 
thren Mathis, Fennell, and Sterlings. 

4. Read the Church letters; took an account of the state of 
the Churches, and enrolled the names of the delegates. 

5. Received two newly constituted Churches, their princi- 
ples appearing sound and orthodox, one in Duplin, Meadow 
Meeting house; the other in South-Carolina, on Honey Camp. 

6. Read a Corresponding Letter from the Neuse Associa- 
tion, by the hands of Brother Carey, vvith a number of their 
minutes. Welcomed the Brother to a seat with us. 

7. The Circular Letter was read and received without cor- 
rection or amendment. 

8. Agreed that the next Association be held at Bull Tall 
Meeting house, New-Hanover county. Brother Morris to 
preach the introductory Sermon, and in case of failure, Bro- 
ther Gornto. Appointed Brother Morris to write the next 
Circular Letter. 

9. Appointed Brother George Fennell to write a letter of 
correspondence to the Neuse Association. 

10. Nominated preachers for the Stage on Lord's day, viz. 
Goodman, Morris and Reaves. And adjourned till Monday 
10 o'cloc!%. Prayer by Brother Goodman. 

^ SUNDAY, 0CT0BE^6. * - » ■ ML 

The Brethren, pursuant to appointment, met on Suiicfey 
morning, and proceeded to preach to a very crowded audience 
from subjects as loUovV. Elder Goodman from yohn Hi, 3. 
Elder Morris from John xx, 30, 31. Elder Reaves from 
John i, 36. The word was preached with spirit and fervour, 
and. we trust a blessing will result from the labours of the day. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 7. 

1. Met agreeably to adiournment. Brother Reaves prayed, 
and we proceeded to business. 

2. Read and approved the Letter to Neuse Association by 
Brother Fcnnell, and appointed Brethren Jacob Williams and 
Simeon Williams messengers to bear our Letter and Minutes 
to said Association. 

3. Agreed to continue 1st Thursdays in March and Septem- 
ber for purposes of divine humiliation and grateful praise, as 
stated in our former Minutes. 

4. The Commiitee of Finance gave in their report and was 
discharged. 

5. Agreed to submit to the Churches, the question, What 
shall be done with the money now in the Association fund ? 
Shall it be sent to rejoice the heart of some poor benighted 
heathen ? Shall it be distributed among our most needy 
prea* hers ? Or shcdl it be devoted to the encouragement of 
something like a domestic mission ? 

6. Quere, from the Beaver Dam Church in Columbus : *' Is 
it orderly in a Baptist Church to omit the duty of feet wash- 
ing ?" In submitting the solution of a question like this, it 
appears highly important, distinctly to fix on the meaning of 
the language in Scripture, and the intention of the exhortation 
or charge, as recorded by St. John, and given by the blessed 
Jesus. If the language in the xiii John implies what we un- 
derstand by a gospel ordinance, we conceive the subsequent 
Apostles to have been defective in making a declaration of 
the whole council of God, for we find washing feet no where 
resembling an ordinance either in time or place. But if the 
language alluded to implies, ^ht kind offices of meekness, con- 
descension, and love, then W( find the subject mentioned by 
Paul in charge to Timothy, especting the widow who should 
come under the bounty of the Church. He says, " If she 
have lodged strangers, if she have wasf.ed the saints' feet, if 
she have relieved the afflicted, if she have diligently followed 
every work." Hence the subject in our opinion stands not in 
the class of ordinances, but is connected with those various 
kind attentions due from one Christian to another. " If ye 
know these things, happy are ye if ye do them." 

7. Resolved to express in the Minutes a sense of grateful 
acknowledgment for the hospitality and friendship observed 
during the session of the Association. And adjourned by the 
Moderator, to time and place appointed. 

JOB GOODMAN, Moderator, 
ALLEN MORRIS, Clerk, 



4 



Reporf of the Committee of Finance. 



Received from the Churclies or this Association^ 

Rem.-iiiiiig in the I rousury, 

Pa 1 *'nr printing- last year's minutes, 

Pad Clerk, 

Paid Assistant Clerk, " , 



529 20 

111 05^—1140 25^- 
$15 00 
14 00 
5 00— 34 00 



Received from the Big Swamp Church for Foreign Missions, $1 



$106 25^ 



Counties 




^" '-^ 1" i1 


^ 




1 ^ 


and 


Delegates. 


^ ! ~> § i^ 


5 


^. 


llll 


Churches. 






1 


2 


.%h< 






fi^5_'^ 


5_ 


Si\<. '■^, 


Sampsost Coustt, 














j DC. 


Mingo, 


Wm Layton,.lesse Strickiing, 












l! 32 1 00 


Coharai, 


Jas. Mithls, I. Stepnens, 


7 










3:1 16 2 00 


Seven Mile, 


Simon Hobbs, ./. Fleming, 








o 




1 


61 1 00 


New Hope, 


John Carrol, 




1 










20; 1 30 


Beaulah, 


. 














1 


Hornet M. H. 


John Tue, 


1 






1 




1 


191 50 


J)dplin, 














J 1 


Bear Marsh, 


Allen Morris, 






5; 




3 


381 50 


Lime Stone, 


Jas. Rbafield, W. H. Houston, 


1 










1 


oul 50 


Muddy creek, 


D. Sutherland, I. Brown, 


5 




15 






1 


541 00 


Nahunga, 


J. Tliomas, H Best, 














17i2 00 


Island creek. 


Hiram Mu:-ray, R. Chaseri, 


S, 2 


4 








4211 00 


HOKESOlf, 




















Ashpole, 


- 


















Bear Swamp, 


- 














23 


1 00 


Saddle Tree, 


- - - - . 


















Burn' Island, 


John Webb, 














26 


1 00 


New-Hanoveu, 




















Bui! Tail, 


George Fennell, H. Sterling, 


1 




l>i 




2! 74 


2 00 


Maple Hill, ^ 


Benj'n I-aiiier, iuo. Blake, ■ 


4 






1 




1: 46 


■ 00 


Rile3''s cpeekj 


.1, Cromb, D. George, 


4 






1 




l! 26,1 50 


AVilmington, 


Tohn Larkins, 












9 


23 


1 00 


Bladen-, 




















Beaver Dam, 


. 


















Big Swamp, 


Job Goodman, E. Nichols, 


3 










1 50 


2 00 


Walker's Bluff, 



















Onsiow, 


















South West M. H, 


D. Araan, Simeon Vvilliams, 


i> 










1 571 5S 


Yeope's M. H. 


Daniel Nixon, 






2 






2, 76;2 00 


Chapel Run, 





















Columbus, 




















White Marsh,*' 


, 


















7 Creeks, 


• . 


















Beaver Dam, 


.... 


10 


2 


1 






58 


, 


New Britain, 





















BRrNswicK, 




















Mill Cnefc, .. 





1 










1 431 05 


CU-M7i>-HLAND, 




















Cape-Fear, 


. 


















"Watxe, 




















Thunder Swamp, i 


- 


















A''e^vly constituted Ch's 


t ; 


















Duplin, 


■ . ' i. 


















Meadows M. H. 


J. Brooks, F. Picket, 












14 


1 00 


So'th-Caholina, 
















Honey Camp, 











! 






11 


1 25 



The MemherfS f'nai compose the. Cape ¥t'nr TiapHst ^sftociation. he'd 
at *^'iutii fferit Un)ilui.v CiiU'dif, on the Slit, Gih. and T'h d lijs of 
October^ A. D ISiZ^. to the Churches which t/iey represent. 

Beloved Brethren, 

According to custom, we proceed to 
adflress you, by way of a Circular Letter. The subject to 
which we would call your attci>tion at present, is Charity : 
winch We una rstand to be n thing short of th*. love or G"d 
shtd abroad in the heart; a gracious habit, principle or dispo- 
si'ion,- W( ought in our soul by the Spirit oi G'd, whcrcijy 
wi. rsieem, desire, and deiight in God in Christ as our chici' 
g'lod, and the fountain of all iiltssings ; love the people of 
Goft, and are inclined and enabled to delight in spiritual fel- 
lowship with such as bear his irliage, and desire to do good to 
all in.u. eveti our enendes. 

To use the words of an .ible writer, " charity doth not con- 
sist in spc' ulative ideas, floating in the head, and leaving the 
heart untouched and cold; neither is it confined to that indo- 
lent good nature, which makes us rest satisfied v.'ith being 
free from inveterate malice or ill will to our fellov^ creatures, 
without proraptuig us to be of service to any. True charity 
is an active principle." 

We shall endeavor in the first place, to show how charitv 
manifests itse f. Secondly, urgfc its necessity. Thirdly and 
lastly, use some arguments, with a view to excite you to the 
practice of christian duties, or in other words, to the practi- 
cal use of charitv . 

Charity, or love, manifests itself, first, in love to God, and 
a desire to be like him. The love of God has the upp^rm- si 
sent in the minds of chrisians. The}' love liim M'iih their 
wh!>le soul, heart, mind and ssrength, and that because he 
first lovfd them, and gave himself tor their sins. They know 
how good and merciful he has been to them — They do not 
wish to offend him, tuid are grieved because they cannot love 
him more and serve him better ; and can say with the Psalm- 
ist. "• who have I ii> Heaven but thee, and there is none upon 
earth that I desire beside thee." Their souls desire is to be 
con ormed to his likeness — As they hate borne the image ol 
the earthly they wish to bear the image of the Heavenly^ — - 
Their praver to the Father of Mercies is, that he would re- 
instamp his image in their souls, and give them more of that 
mind which was in Chr st Jesus. 

Secondly. Charity, or love, discovers itself in love to the 
people of God ; -nd this is, perhaps, as sure a criterion as 
any laid down in the Sci;ptures, by which to know whether 



6 

we have the love of God abiding in us or not. '* By this 
shall all men know thai yc ore mj' disciplfs, if ye have love one 
to another." '' VVc know that we have passed from death un- 
to life," saith the same writer, " because wt; love the brethren." 
The love of christians, however, is not confined to the people 
of God ; they are inclined to do good to all «ien as much as 
in them lieth, but especially to ihcm that are of the household 
of faiih; are enabled to love thrir rnemics (not in such a 
manner as to countenance their actions, but to forcive them,) 
to liless those who cursu them, and pray for, and do good to 
such as dcspiteluU) use and persecute them, if their ene- 
mies hunger, they are willing to feed them, and if they thirst, 
to give them drink. This benevolent disposition extends both 
to the souls and bodies of men, but especially to the fcrm<:r ; 
they would gladly prevail on others to go along with them. 
It seemed to he the desire of good (jld Moses. "■ Come go 
along with us," said he, ''and we v,'ill do thte good and not 
harm all the days of thy lilVi" When the blessed Jesus found 
Philip and induced him to follovr him, Philip directly findeth 
Nathaniel and invited him to come and see Jesis. Charity 
ought to influence us to think f.ivorahly of other sects or de- 
nominations of christians, notwithstanding they differ from us 
in sotr.e particulars. Our Saviour's own words favor such an 
opinion as this. " And John ansv/ered him saving, master, 
we saw one casting out devils in thy name, and he followeth 
not us ; and we forbade him, because he followeth not us. 
But Jt sus said, forbid him not; for there is no man which 
shall do a miracle in my name that can lightly spi ak evil of 
me. For he that is not against us is on our part." 

Thirdly. Charity manifests itself in making the glory of 
God the supreme end of our actions. The true christian acts 
with an eye single to the glory of God ; he wants to glorify 
him in his body and spirit which are his, by believing onhimj 
walking in him, praising obeying, and imitating him. The 
language of his heart is, *■* God forbid that I should glory in 
any thing save in the cross of Christ." Sensible of his own 
imperfections and proneness to go in forbidden ways, know- 
ing that in him. i. e. in his flesh, dwelleth no good thing, he 
renounces all pretensions to merit, and is ready to adopt the 
words of David, " not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but unto 
thy name give glory for thy mercy and for thy truth's sake." 

Another proof of charitv, or the love of God, being shed 
abroad in the heart, is delighting in the service of God and 
communion with him. Believers in the Lord delight in his 
ordinances and in hearing the word preached, are often en- 



gaged in meditating thereon, are instant in prayer, &c* '' One 
thing have I desired oi thee," saith David, that I will seek 
after, " thai I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the 
■days of niy life, to behold the beauty of the Lord, and to en- 
quire in his temple." And in another place, ••' how I delight 
to do thy will, O God." The children of God delight in his 
law after the inner man, notwithstanding, with their flesh they 
serve the law of sin, with their nainds they serve the law of 
God. They experience and delight in fellowship or comnau- 
ninn with their God and Saviour. It is said in the first epis- 
tle general oi John, '^ that which vve have seen and heard de- 
clare we unto you, that ye also naay have fellowship with us ; 
and truly our lellowship is with the Father and his son Jesus 
Christ." 

Another manifestation of charity or love, is grief under the 
hidings of the Father's face. We have a plain proof of this 
io the case of Ji b, vvhen thus circumstanced. O ! that I knew 
where I might fiiuj him ! that I might come even unto his 
seat* David says, "Thou didst hide thy face and I was 
troubled " Mcst, and perhaps all ot God's people experience 
such times, and are made to pray to the Lord, not to leave nor 
forsake them, but to lift upon them the light of his reconciled 
countenance. 

Charity produces a willingness to relinquish all that stands 
in opposition to the will of God, though it be as near as a right 
hand, a right foot, or a right eye ; and can say with St. Paul, 
*' What things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ, 
yea doubtless, and I c(junt all things but loss for the Txcelleucv of 
the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord." That eminent Apos- 
tle was willing to deny himself the use of things that were 
lawful for the sake of his weaker brethren. '' If meat make 
my brother to offend, I will eat no flesh while the world stand- 
eih, lest I make my brother to offend." 

Again, charity manifests itself by confidence in his promi- 
ses and obedience to his word. " In thee, O Lord, do I put 
my trust, saith the Psalmist, let me never be put to confusion." 
Believers, when calling to mmd the comfort they have receiv- 
ed, and the burthens from which they have been freed by the 
precious promises of the Gospel, cannot but confide in them, 
they view them all to be yea and amen in Christ Jesus. In 
fact, " after they believed they were sealed with that Holy 
Spirit of promise, whi-h is the earnest of our inheritance un- 
til the redemption of the purchased possession, unto the praise 
of his glory," saith the Apostle. The children ot God desire 
to be obedient to his word, to observe his commands, to be 



8 

guided by his counsel, and directed by his vrord, and wait to 
have a thus saith the Lord for all they d >. " And hereby vve 
know that wv know him iJ we keep his Commandments." 

Lastly, to sum up all in a few words, in the language of St. 
Paul, Charity '' beareth all things, btlieveth all ihings, hoptih 
all things, endureth all things :" i. e. beiicveth all the threats 
denounced in the word of God against the disobedient, and 
finally impenitent; and hopeth for the fulfilment of all the 
promises of the Gospel to the people ol God ; and endureth 
Wiih patience, all the afflictions, persecutions, disappointments, 
trials and diffi uiti.s which God, in his providence, suffers to 
come upon them ; believing that all things sliall work toge- 
ther for good to them that love God — to them that are the 
called according to his purpose. And knowing that those who 
enter into the Kingdom of God must do it through great tri- 
bulation. 

We shall endeavor, in the second place, to urge the necessi- 
ty of charity. It is indispensably necessary, in as mu^h as 
withoat it vve cannot be happy neither in this life nor that 
whuh is to come. Except a man be born again he cannot, see 
the Kingdom of God. Now every one that is born of God 
hath this principle of love divine implanted in his soul. *' God 
is love, and he that dweileth in love dwrileth in God and God 
in him." Again, '*■ Every one that loveth is born of God 
and knoweth God." Let not that man who is destitute of 
love to his fellov/ creatures, as it respects both soul and body, 
or their present and future welfare, think that he hath any 
part or lot in the matter, or any right to an inheritance among 
them that are sanctified. " If any man sav I love God and 
liateth his brother, he is a liar, for he that loveth not his bro- 
ther whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath 
not seen ?" *' Whoso hath this world's goods," the same wri- 
ter observes, " and seetli his brother have need and ?.hutteth 
, up his bowels of compassion from him. how dweileth the love 
of God in him ?" Not meaning exclusively a brother by pro- 
fession or near relation, but any one of the human family who. 
is an object of charity. Whatever noble in life we may have 
attained unto — whatever valuable endowments we may possess, 
no matter how many good actions we may have performed out- 
wardly, or what sacrifices we may have made, if our inward 
disposition does not correspond therewith, or in other words, 
if we have not charity, we are nothing. St. Paul saith, 
" Though I spak with the tongues of men a d of angels, and 
have not charit's , I am become as sounding brass or a tinkling 
cymbal ; and though I have the gift of prophecy and under- 



9 

stand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have 
all faith so that I could remove mountains, and havt noc chari- 
ty, I am nothing , and though I bestow ail my goods to teed 
the poor, and though I give my body to be burnt, and have 
not charity, it profitc-th me nothing." 

We come now, in the last pbice, to endeavor to use. some 
arguments with a view to i xcite you to the practice oi Chris- 
tian duties, or the practical use of charity. We are sorry that 
there is any occasion for an) thing to be said on this part of 
the subject ; but the coldness that prevails throughout the 
Churches generally, is too apparent to be denied. Because 
iniquity abounds, the love ot miwiy is waxed eold. Pride and 
covetousness seem likely to usu^ the place of humilily and 
charity, partyism, prejudice, and a spirit for contr'>versy, ap- 
pear almost to have gained the ascendancy oV( r brotherly 
love. The people of the world have too much room to speak 
reproachfully, and are ready enough to conclud- that there 
is no reality in religion, for ttiey see but little difference be- 
tween professors and non-professors. This would hot be so 
much -he case if our lights v/ere shining before men in the 
way which our Saviour commanded. Depend upon it lireth- 
ren,the misconduct of professors does more injury to the cause 
of religion, than all the opposition of wicked men and devils 
put togtther. 

Consider, in the first place, the great and unspeakable love 
of God in giving his only begotten Son to die for your sins. 
Rem mber what the innocent, the amia'>!e» the benevolent Je- 
sus has done for you ; he left his Throne of Glory and be- 
came a poor and afflicted man. He was despised and rrj cted 
of men, a man of s rrows and acquainted witn grief; He had 
not a plate wherie t() lay his blessed h ad, endured the con- 
tradiction of sinners against himself, was oppressed and af- 
flicted ; his visage was marred more than any man, and his 
form more than the sons of men — and after all this sorrowful 
life he became obedient unto death, even the death of the 
Cross. Thus he bore our sins in his own body on the tree, 
was made sin (or us who knew no sin, that we might be made 
the righteousness of God in him. Recollect also, when you 
were borne down with the burthen of sin and guilt which lay 
heavy upon y'>ur soul, felt condemned and ready to sink in 
despair, it was the precious blood of Christ that healed your 
wounds ; the Father of Mercies was pleased to give you faith 
to receive him in the promises of the Gospel, through the 
agency of the Holv Spirit. »Dear brethren, can you think of 
these things without being drawn out in love and gratitude to 

B 



10 

him, who hath done such great things for you 'i Let the 
goodness oJ God lead you to rtptniance. Praise ye the Lurd 
for his woudi rial works, »nd his goodness to the children of 
men. Pra) God to enable you to love hiai with \our whole 
hearts ; manifest your love to him by loving his poor Saints. 
He takes whatever is done to them as done to himself. '"' In 
as much as yc did it unto one of the least of thesf my breth- 
ren, ye did it unto mc." Let a sense of his pardoning love, 
induce you to forgive those who have tr- spa -ed against you. 
You have sinned against him mueh more than any one can 
possibly have ofiVnded or trespassed against you .; therefore, 
forgive thtm : and indeed, the word of God tt lis us plaii.ly, 
*' Except ye forgive men their trespasses, neither will your 
Heavenly Father forgive your trespasses." Consider the Umg 
forbearance and tender mercy of God towards you — how he 
has borne v/idi your manners—when you have strayed from 
him he has kindly brought you back, healed your backslid- 
ings, and loved you freely for Jesus' sake. Sh(»uld not this 
influence you to bearwith the infirmities of others. It is the ex- 
press command of Scripture, that the strong bear with the in* 
firmities of the vv^eak ; it is the duty of Christians to bear 
one another';? burdens. " Brethrf n. if a man bt overiakt n in 
a fault, ye which are spiritual restore such an one in the spi- 
rit of meekness ; considering thyself, lest thou also be tt- mpt- 
ed." Thi-se admotiitions ought to make us think as favourably 
as we can of others, and not judge them at any rate, for '' Thou 
art inexcusable, O! man whosoever thou art, that judgest." 
It requires no great fliscernment to discover the faults of 
others, but much humility to acknowledge our own. We 
should walk i ircumsprctly towards them that are witbnut,. 
also redeeming the time brcnuie the davs are evil. The 
goodness of God to us with regard, both to spiiitual and tem- 
poral things, ought to incline us to be of service to our fellow 
creatures in some way. If you are rich, rein< mber God hath 
given you the things of this world to use and not to abuse; 
you are commanded to labour, but what for ? that you may 
have to give to him that needeth. You are told not to be 
high minded, but condescend to men of low estate. It is your 
duty to relieve thf oppressed, to feed the hungry, clothe the 
nakfd, &c. '' To do good and to communicate forget not, for 
with such sacrifices God is well pleased.'* Let not your gold 
and silver canker, and the rust of them be a witnt-ss against 
you in the last day. If riches increase set not your heart upon 
them. Lay up for yourselves treasures in Heaven, where 
neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not 



11 

break through and steal, for where your treasure is there will 
your heart be also. It you arc poor, stili vou ma\ be useful. 
If you have not gold and silver, such as you have givt- unto 
your fellow crcatarrs ; exhort one another daily whilt it is 
called" to day ; advise an<i instruct your Jamilits in their duty ; 
let not your neighiiors perish for want oi instruction ; and be 
sure to fonify vour precepts by good examples. And above 
all things, brethren, have fervent charity among yourselves' — 
it is the bond of perfectness. 

In order hat the benefits of the duties recommended maj''^ 
appear still more plainly, let us contrast With them the conse- 
quences that may follow a contrary procedure. Suppose a 
raon professing Godliness to have gr- wn cold and negligent 
with regard to the duties of religion ; his Bible perhaps much 
neglrctbd, family worship seldom attended to, and when per- 
formed, faif lU s f 'rmalicy more than true worship ; remiss- 
ness in instructing his familv would follow, his children 
would be more inclined to partake of the y'ain amusement^,, 
and to indulge in the giddy fashions of the world than they 
otherwise would have been ; his servants not being restrained 
by precept, and not having good examples set before them, 
would become headstrong and unruly, and'mgre hardened in 
iniquity ; his neighbors emboldened and mi^-led by his impro- 
per conduct, would be indt-jcd to t^steem religion very- lighti)^ 
the remonstrances of conscience might be silenced, the coun- 
sel ')f God rejected, and the ruin of their souls completed. 
If such coldness shou'd become general, (and indeed it is too 
much the case alrtadv) would not the consequences be alarm- 
ing? Infidelity would gain ground, the powers of darkness 
gather strength, the cause of our ble sed Redeemer injured 
and neglected, and he himself wounded in the house of bis 
professed followers. 

One of the greates' reasons, and the last we shall mention, 
why we should esteem charity very highly, and practice it 
too, is, that it never faileih : this crowns all the rest. ' Whe- 
ther there be prophecies, they shall fail ; wbetber there be 
tongues, they shall cease ; whether there be knov/Vedge, it 
shall vanish away — But charity never faileth.'* Faith, hope, 
and charity, now abid< th ; but when we shall bid adieu to all 
earthly things, and, and meet around the throne of God, and 
view our blessed Saviour face to face; then faith will be swal- 
lowed up in sight and hope in possession ; but Charity, or the 
love of God, will endure forever ; all will be love in that 
felessed region, where God will wipe away all tears from our 



-■.•••'. 12 

• * •■ . * . 

eyes, where theje'will be no more sorrow not. pain i- bot oue 
eternal song of praise to God anJ the LarT>b forever. 

It may '^e objected, that we hivK dwelt too mfjch upon 
'lyorl^s. Wc are willing to admit tt)ac tJiere nfay be good 
%vorks, apparently, without charit}'.; byt there cancot b<i cha- 
lity Without good works,' for it is^a living and aciive'priftei'- 
pfc, which will 'produce them/ " The tree is known by hjs 
fruit." 

," If* vain a^en-lalk of living faitb, 
■"' ' ■ - When' all their, works exhibit death .;• 

When tiiey iudulge'ioiiic sinful view, 
Iiv all thty say, iij all^ney dcu_ », • • 

A iiarren tree tiiat beat's no friiii., „• 

Btings no Lrreat honor to-its root. . . . ' . * 

When on the bouglis wth fruit we see, " . 

'Tis i hen we ciy a goodly tree." 

We do,not pretend to excuse ourselves froal the faults that 
we have been enumerating; we feel tbat they are applicable 
^ to us, and we implore the forgiveness of our Lord and Mas- 
. ter, and beseech him to increase our faith, hope, and love^ arid/ 
enable us to grow in grace and every christian virtue j and 
to cause charity to abound, and all- who nanie the name of 
Christ to depart from iniquity, that their light may so shine 
before men, that they«*may se? their good iv^orks, and glorify 
our Father who art in Heaven. 

May Heaven's blessing attend whatever may have been 
written agreeably to his will, and pardon the reverse for 
Christ's sake. Amen. 



mimii^m! 



OF THE 

CAPE-FEAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

ASSEMBLED AT 
BULL-TAIL MEETING HOUSE, NEW-HANOVER COUTS'TY, 

October, 1823. 



♦ 



>T. Gales & Son, State Printer? 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was preached by Elder Morris^ 
from Heh. xii, 28, *' Wherefore, we receiving a kingdom," &c. 

2. Met in an associated capacity. Brother White prayed, 
and the Clei'k called over the list of Churches. A majority 
being represented, proceeded to elect officers, namely, brethren 
George Fennell, Moderator, A. Morris, Clerk, and James Rha- 
field, Assistant Clerk. 

3. A committee of finance was appointed, consisting of bre- 
thren James Mathis, E. C. Gavin and John Oliver. 

4. Jnvited Messengers to take seats with us, on which bro- 
thei' Timothy Spence, from the Raleigh Association, came for- 
ward with a packet of Minutes, certifying his delegation ; he 
also gave a pleasing verbal account of the good work of grace 
going on in the limits of that body. And brother Solomon Ca- 
rey was present as Messenger from the Neuse Association, with 
a Letter and Minutes. 

5. Tjje Church Letters were read, and the names of theDe* 
legates enrolled. 

6. Received a newly constituted Church into our union, 
namely, Lisbon, Sampson county. 

7. The Circular Letter was read and approved of. 

8. Appointed brother Rhafield to wiite to the Neuse Asso- 
ciation, and bromer Morris to the Raleigh ; and brother Gornto 
our Messenger to ttie Neuse, and brother Morris to the Raleigh 
Association. j^ 

9. Proceeded to appoint brother Hiram Sterl^^ to write our 
next Circular Letter, or> a subject of his own choice. 

10. Nominated Preachers to occupy the Stage on the Sab- 
bath, viz. Elders W^hite, Thames, Reaves, and Morris. Ser- 
vice to commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. Adjourned till Mon- 
day 10 o'clock. Prayer by brother Gornto. 



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5. 

The brethren designed for the Stage met the crowded assem^ 
bly, and preached from subjects chosen as follow : Brother 
W hite from Matt, xxiv, 14 ', brother Thames from FsaU xxxiv. 



3 

19 ; brother Morris from Isn. Ixii, 6 ; and brother Reaves from 
2 Cor. xiii, 5. Brother F. Cooper also preached to the con^ 
gregation in the liouse. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 6. 

12. Met agreeably to adjournment. Brother Thames pray- 
ed. Read and received the Corresponding^ Letters. 

13. Agreed that our next session be held at Cedar creek, 
Cumberland county, on the Saturday before the 1st Sabbath in 
October, 1824. Brother George Fennell to preach the intro- 
ductory Sermon ; in case of failure, brother Jesse Rogers. 
Preaching to begin at 10 A. M. 

14. Requested the Clerk to designate, as far as possible, in 
the list, vacancies, destitute places, &c. in the bounds of the 
Association. 

15. Agreed to express our thanks to the inhabitants for the 
friendly entertainment of both brethren and strangers, during 
the session. 

16. The committee of finance gave in their report, as follows : 

Remaining in the Treasury, glOG 25 

Received from the Churches this year, 27 70 



-S133 95 



Paid for printing last year's Minutes, 1^22 50 

Paid the Clerk, 14 00 

Paid the Assistant Clerk, 4 00 

Brethren J. and S. Williams, for visiting Neuse 

Association, 10 00 

50 50 



*S83 45 
Received from Cape-Fear Church, for Foreign 

Missions, S3 00 

Collections on the Sabbath from Congregation, 8 27 

gn 27 

17. Adjourned to time and place appointed. Prayer by bro- 
ther Rhafield. 

GEORGE FENNELL, Moderator. 
ALLEN MORRIS, Clerk. 

* The majority of the Churches signify, by their Letters, that they wish the 
surplus part of the Association Fund to rcmaii; for tlie uses originally contem.- 
plated. 



4 



COUNTIES 
AND CHURCHES. 



DELEGATES. 



Sampson County. 
Mingo,* 
Coharai, 
7 Mile, 
New-Hope,* 
Beaulah, 
Hornet M. H,* 
Lisbon, 

Duplin. 
Bear Marsh, 
Limestone, 
Muddy Creek, 
Nahunga, 
Island Creek, 
Meadow M. H. 
Robesoii. 
Ashpole, 
Bear Swamp, 
Saddle-ti'ee,* 
Burnt Islands, 

J^etu-Hanover. 
Bull Tail, 
M;iple Hill, 
Riley's Creek, 
Wilmington,* 

Bladen, 
Beaver Dam, 
Big Swamp, 
Walker's Bluff, 
Onsloxv. 
S. W. Meetinghouse 
Yeope's M. H. 
Chapel Run,* 
Columbus. 
White Marsh, 
Seven Creeks, 
Beaver Dam, 
New Britain, 

Brunswick. 
Mill Creek, 

Cumberland. 
Cape-Fear, 

Wayne. 
Thunder Swamp,* 
South- Caroli7ia. 
Honey Camp, 



James Mathis. 

John Carroll, John Chesnut. 
John Ingram, E. C. Gavin. 

G. Herring, T. Vann. 

Mien Morris, John Oliver. 
Ja7nes Rhafield, J. Wilkinson. 
B. Padgett, Jesse Brown. 
Howell Best, E. Lee. 
Amos Shuffield, H. Mui-ray. 
J. Brooks, Nat. James. 

J. Thompson, J. Pitman. 



Jacob Freeman, J . Smith, 

G. Fennell, Jesse Rodgers. 

J. Blake, .(. Batcheior. 

D. George, James Kennedy, 



David ThomaSy Isaac Jessop. 
D. Lennon. 



S. Williams, J. Langley. 
J. Gornto, J. Taylor. 



L. E. Simmons, Wm Hays. 



John McDaniel. 



OSIS! 



10 



Wl w 



^3 
a, 3 



|2 



O 25 
I 



32 
142 
61 
19 
30 
19 
6 

35 
32 
57 
13 
44 
16 

64 

21 
81 

83 
47 
30 
23 

64 
58 



6.5 



177 



12 



$ C. 
1 00 



1 00 
70 

too 

1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



1 50 



00 
00 

00 
00 

50 



00 
50 



1 50 



1 oc 



r 50 



Pearce Griffin. 

Note. — An Asterisk (*) signifies a vacancy ; and those names in italics, de- 
note Regular Ministers. '- 

Perhaps it would be well for the Churches, in their letters, to express their 
situation, more particularly relative to ministerial supplies ;for the information 
of the Clerk is but limited on the svibject. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 



The Cape- Fear Baptist Association ^ to the Churekes 
represented. 

Dear Brethken — Perhaps few subjects in the Christian 
Religion are more partially understood, or viewed with less 
concern, than that of the connection which necessarily exists 
between the cause and the effect, or the means and the end. 
Hence we sometimes find the same person a free agent, in the 
most unlimited acceptation of the term, on one subject, and an 
antinomian or fatalist on another. The latter sentiment ap- 
pears to teacii, that whatever is to be, will be, without fixing 
the attention on the various efficient causes leading to their de- 
signed results. This principle, abstractedly taken, seems to 
involve a contradiction to a train of Scripture texts, such as, 
*< Seek ye the Lord while he may be found," " And him that 
cometh to me 1 will in no wise cast out," " Draw nigh to God 
and lie will draw nigh to you." Every idea which represents 
the timely and diligent use of means as unnecessary, under cir- 
cumstances either physical or religious, should be discarded 
from our system of belief. While the former principle is cal- 
culated to derogate mucli of the praise of our salvation from 
the Creator, and ascribe it to the creature ; not duly regarding 
the work of grace in the soul as originating in and receiving its 
nurture and increase through the influences of the Holy Spirit. 

Notwithstanding the scurrilous abuse that the doctrine here 
alluded to has attached to the subject of predestination, or dis- 
tinguishing grace, so clearly inculcated in tiie Scriptures, it 
leaves the affair of man's final salvation in a point of awful 
uncertainty, especially apparent tu those who know the frailty 
of humanity, and the infirmity connected with the best of tlicir 
works. But to pursue the theme proposed. It must be obser- 
ved, that although God, as an infinite and independent being, 
has not always confined himself to what we call means in the 
operations of his almighty power ; yet his ordinary method of 
manifesting his creative might, appeal's to be in a way of means 
prepared or appointed to particular ends ; and in some instan- 
ces we observe a long train of arrangements designed to effect 
certain important events. 

Man was not originally formed independent of the dust of 
the earth, neither was there an help-mate for him found, save 
by a miraculously divine j'esort to his own side. Noah and his" 



\ 6 

family were not secured from the impending deluj^e until suit- 
able means were ordered and |)rej)ared. Israel were redeemed, 
from Kgypt at the command of the Loi-d, by Moses and Aaron, 
as adequate means (»r instruments, and though they appeared 
for a time unsuccessful, yet at the word of the Lord they sur- 
mounted every obstacle, and victoriously prevailed against 
every opposing force. Perhaps it does not become creatures* 
enveloped in darkness and shut up in houses of clay, even tf) 
suppose that the tremendous work of redemption could have 
been effected in any other way than that in which it appears 
on record. We evidently behold in tiiis work the solemn and 
momentous diain of ai-rangements, causes, and effects, run- 
ning down from eternity, unfolding as they pass through time, 
and tending rapidly to eternity again, redeeming, sanctifying 
and sustaining tiie millions wiio have an interesting view of 
this great salvation. It is now the honoi-, the joy and delight 
of the believer, to recount tlie instances of divine favour and 
strong compassion exhibited here. And was it imperiously 
expedient that a council should be called to deliberate on a case 
of all cases the most desperate and the most alarming ! tiie 
divitjely wise and joyful result! A body is prepared by the 
iirst in council, that body assumed by the second, and the (jffice 
of Comiortcr sustained by the tin id. God loved the world and 
gave his Son, the Son descejjded to live and die and triumph 
too, all for lost sinners. The Holy Spirit from on high is pro- 
fusely she<i abroad on the day of Pentecost. The Apostles and 
disciples are thus fully prepared and equijjped to enter on their 
great work of suffering, toil and privation. The miraculous 
gift of tongues was conferred oti the primitive preachers of the 
Gospel, to expedite and facilitate the spread of the Christian 
Religion ; we readily understand the gracious propriety of this 
wonderful outpouring of the spirit by miraculous gifts and 
signs; when the church at tiiat day is beheld as a solitary 
handful of corn waving on the toj) of the mountain. Very dif- 
ferent indeed is the present state of chr-istianity. We now, with 
pleasing anticipation, obseive about fifty millions of Christians 
of every sect and order swarming over tiieir respective jjai-ts 
of the globe, furjiishcd with ail the means requisite for the dif- 
fusion of the word of life to tlieir perisiiing fellow njen. Were 
the ])resent Church as fully under the power and influence of 
our risen Saviour's farewell ciiarge, as were the Christians of 
the first century, before two ages more sliould have elapsed, 
Ihe Bible would be translated into e\eiy language under the 
Avhole heavens, and ^txevy idol temple either demolished or con- 
verted to the worship of the true God* All this through means^ 
backed and blessed by Israel's God» 



In prosecutin,^ our subject, we may with propriety remark 
the method obserxed by Christ while personally on earth. 
When he would pay tribute, Peter is sent to t!»e sea to get mo- 
ney of a fish, When kindly disposed to feed those crowds that 
followed him, and attended on his ministry, natural loaves and 
fishes are multiplied. When the eyes of the blind are to be 
opened, clay and si)ittle are used in one i-emarkable instance, 
and a command enjoined to $^o to the pool and wash ; he went 
and washed, and came seein.^. Thus we see that God, thou,^li 
possessed of infinite power, has condescended to use seemingly 
contemptible means, and weak instruments in the illustrious 
affairs of his creation, providence and grace. 

A few practical remarks will close our present letter : 

t. A sense of the importance which is scripturally and evan- 
gelically attached to a right use of means, is calculated to in- 
spirit and stimulate the believer in the whole rotind of religious 
duty. Confident that means are appointed with the same par- 
ticularity, as are the ends to be produced, the man who fears 
the Lord obeys the voice of his Servant. The soul that knows 
the \\ortli of prayer, though assured t!»at he is saved by grace 
and not of works, yet to approach a Throne of Mercy, is to 
him a holy duty, a sweet privilege — the means of keeping up 
a correspondence with eternal things. To repair to the house 
of God, to attend to the pleasing and profitable business of 
praise, prayer, and hearing the word, are all delightsome 
means, full of immortal and never-failing results. And though 
sacrifices, dictated by personal liberality or personal probity, 
arc not designed to take away the guilt of sin, (as the Catho- 
lics superstitiously suppose) yet the well exercised Christiaa 
is cheerfully disposed to encourage the heart and uphold the 
hands of those who are called to devote their strength and their 
talents, to the edification and service of the Church. 

2. Under an impressive sense of this subject, the minister of 
the gospel advances in the way of laborioiis duty, though per* 
plexed, he is not in despaii-; persecuted, but not forsaken j 
cast down, but not destroyed. In the midst of these, he is 
aware that it has pleased God, by the foolishness of preach ing* 
to save them that believe. And how shall they hear with- 
out a preacher? Did iiot these very preachers apprehend their 
God as a Gt>d of means, they would, no doubt, lay their bibles 
down, and abandon their pulpits. Tliey would be utterly un- 
able to surmount t'ae ci-owded discouragements which often 
throw themselves in their way. But notwithstanding the con- 
flicts originating from various quarters, they are impelled by 
the weight of their charge, and the power of this great dispen-v 
sation, to go forward, often nndsr au oppressive idea ©f their 



/ 



own unworthiness, inability and sin, perhaps under tlie inward 
influence of a broken heart and a contrite spirit, and preach 
that very gospel, and administer that very balm to others, ot* 
whose virtue and healing power they themselves so greatly 
stand in need. 

To conclude. Happy is the man who lives in the habitual 
use of meansj but rests not there. He shall have the counsel 
of the Holy One to guide him here, and grace shall crown and 
call him home. He shall here escape many a frown, and many 
a stripe, and soon sit down where the rod and the staff shall 
be in eternal disuse ; resting oil his bed and walking in his 
righteousness, which is not of the lavfr, but through the faith of 
Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith. The robe 
which the man in Christ who had been caught up into Paradise 
so much admired ; for he evidently ascertained that uo spotted 
garments were worn in that l)oIy place. Seeing these things, 
what manner of persons ought we to be ? Are we looking for 
and hastening unto the coming of the day of God, when the 
heavens shall be dissolved ? Are we looking for new heavens 
and a new earth ? 

We conclude by expressing our ardent wishes that the re- 
freshing and reviving presence of our common Lord may be 
experienced through all the Churches. 

GEORGE FENNELL, Moderater. 
ALLEN MORRIS, Clerk, 





1 






¥ 


? 


i 


i^ 


J 


¥ 


^ 


>^ 


^ 


COUNTIES. 


CHURCHES. 


MESSENGERS. 


"2: 


'-a 
7" 


?- 






a. 


3 


>^ 


•v 






'Mingo, — 


Wm. Jackson, 












iS 


S^ 








Holly, 














32 


50 








Cohery, 


Jas. Mathews, 


























J. Stephens, 


o 


3 




1 


1 


3 


145 






. 




7 Miles, ~ 


Jas. Woodward, 




















Sumpson, 


■< 


Newhope, — 
Beaulah, — 


Jno. Flemming, 
Juo. Chesnut, 
S. Boon, 
Robert Byrd, 


5 


1 


2 




2 


2 


69 
15 








. 




V. Vann, 














2,5 


1 1 






Lisbon, 


G. Herring, 
























^ 


G. Fe nkll, 


3 


1 










1'^ 










'Bear Marsh, 


A. MoRuis, 






















% 


Lime Stone, 


J. RUAFIELD, 

P. Sutherland, 


2 




1 




1 




35 
32 


■'• 




Duplin, 


■< 


Muddy Creek, * 
















57 






Nahunga, — 


Wm. Hairis, 


























E. Lee, 






1 


1 






13 


1 50 








Island Creek, 


R. Chasen, 
II. Stalmxgs, 




3 








1 


46 










^Meddow M. 11, — 


By letter. 




1 










17 










'Ash Pole, 


Bemiet Allen, 




















Robeson, 


•< 


Bear Swamp, — * 
Saddle Tree, — * 
^Burnt [slands. 


Wm. Thompson, 


1 


2 








3 


64 
21 










Charles Storm, 


16 










2 


24 


1 25 








'Bull Tail, 


Jesse Rogers, 


10 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


9S 






►V. Banover, 


1 


Vlaple Hill, — * 
Riley's Creek, — 
_ Wilmington, — 


By letter. 


5 


1 










47 
37 








1 


JoXArHANBETAN, 














30 










'Beaver Dam, 


D. Thaxes, 


























J. Jessap, 


o 








1 


1 


61 




2 


Sladen, 


-^ Big Swamp, 


J. Gl.OPMABr, 






















^Walker's Bluff, * 


J. Singletary, 


2 




1 








51 


1 50 


75 


























rs. W. M. House,— 
-{ Yeope's W. H. 


Gabriel Gray, 


5 


2 






1 


1 


62 


1 50 




Onslo-u; 


Jacob S. Taylor, 


1 












73 








l^Chapel Run, — * 
























f White Marsh, 


E. Brtait, 




















Columbus, 


] 7 Creeks, 


L. Jones, 
By letter. 


1 




1 








35 


I 50 






\^Beaver Dam, 


do. do. 


5 


o 




1 


1 


1 


68 








S New Britain, — 
i Mill Creek, 






















Bninsxuick, 


A. ROBBIKS, 


3 










2 


35 


-> 




Cumberland 


S Cape-Fear, — 


S. Sowel, 
C. :M'Alister, 


3 


2 


3 




2 


4 


175 


1 


o 


ffayne, 


^ Thunder Swamp — * 




















S. Carolina 


^ Honey Camp, 


E. MANSFItt, 


3 


3 








15 


75 





Note. — Licensed Preachers' names are in Italics, and orlained Ministers' niraes 
are in small cajiitals. Tiie dash denotes a vacancy, and tins mark (*} is put to those 
churches from which we received no intclli^'encc this session. 



CIRCULAR. 



To the Churches of the Cape-Fear Baptist ^ssodaiion* 

Bbloved Brethren, 

We again, according to custom, address you by letter. The sub- 
ject to which we now invite your attention, is Humility. This fruit of 
the spirit, is perhaps as little understood, and less cultivated than any one 
of the other graces. A man may speak of it, and forcibly recommend 
it in lofty terms, without having ever known, feelingly, the love and fear 
of God, which are the root of all acceptable obedience to him, or even to 
man. It is necessarily joined with these, and with faith and hope, and is 
a manifestation of their existing in the soul, as a cheerful ol^dience is a 
mark or sign of it. We shall attempt, first, to illustrate our subject; and 
then inculcate the habitual exercise of it. 

Humility is the opposite of pride, as love is of hatred. The spirit of 
the one copies from God, that of the other from Satan. It is " a meek 
and quiet spirit, which in the sight of God is of great price," manifest in 
those who desire to render a cheerful obedience to all the Lord's com- 
mands as revealed in his word, and not to submit to the contrary; and at 
the same time are patient of afflictions for Christ's sake: that or the other 
?>Dint may be observed in those who are impatient of rebuke and disap- 
pointment, and are submissive to some of the precepts through servile fear, 
performing, in the mean while, more than Avhat is required of them, for 
the sake of admiration and advantage. — Man, in his present fallen, lost 
and helpless condition, is entirely destitute ot humility as being the eifect 
of the graces of the spirit, or one of those perfect gifts which descend from 
above; but he is filled with pride, and every thing else, contrary to the pu- 
rity and holiness of his Maker. There is no soundness in mankind; but 
they are not sensible of this, until the Lord overtakes them by his grace, 
which touches the heart, softens it, and at length shows it its native pride, 
which humbles the soul, more and more as it feels its inability to endure 
the growth of it, as well as of the other hateful principles of the human 
heart. They hate a high look and a proud heart, because the Lord hateth 
these; and still these are their daily companions. They desire the contrary 
of these, but it is far from them. They know what a bitter thing it is to 
sin against God They grieve and mourn over their condition, and when 
they have an interesting viev/ of Jesus Christ, ot his righteousness and of 
the great love of God through him, they abhor themselves and repent in 
4ust and ashes; which gives a feeling sense of what we call humility. Man 
in his primitive state was free from both humility and pride: he was free 
from the former, as being the effect of the graces of the Holy Spirit, 
bestowed freely, on the undeserving, but possessed it in a great degree as 
an ingredient in his full cup of happiness, being upright, and rendering 
service to God from the same principle that the elect angels now do: 
from the latter he was free, because it is inconsistent that it should dwell 
^ith innocence; but when he was tempted to rebellion, he com.plied, and 



so brought sin and death into the world, " which passed upon all men."— 
Now if a downfall should cause humble thoughts, we see that it does not; 
and if the abasement ought to be in proportion to the situation, it is not 
the case, — nay verily it is quite the reverse; for fig-leaves are sewed to- 
gether, and the blame is placed on another; self-justification and depraved 
ambition are plainly seen, indicating the sure existence, and rapid growth 
of pride, and the total absence of humility. Perhaps no transgression is 
more heinous in the sight of God than for us to deny that we have sinned 
against Him; for if any deny the Deity, they are more excusable than 
those, who own his existence, and yet say, " we have no sin," thus con- 
tradicting, and laying the blame on Him; manifesting by this, their firm 
belief of the doctrine of fatal necessity, which leads to the service of the 
creature and not of the Creator. If we perform more or less than what 
is enjoined us, we equally betray our ignorance and disaftection. which 
are certain symptoms of infidelity, pride and covetousness; but, if we 
should do readily and cheerfully, all the known commands of God, we 
would set forth our right knowledge, fear, faith and love of him, which 
are the sure marks of humility. When Noah was commanded to build 
the ark, and Moses the tabernacle, we do not learn that they made them 
any larger or less than v^•as prescribed; nor that they omitted thr per- 
formance of their assigned work till a future period; nor that they ques- 
tioned the necessity of such sort of buildings; but the former, " moved by 
fear," which was mixed with love and faith in the truth of God's word, 
manifested his cheerful obedience to the high command of Jehovah, by 
preparing " an ark to the saving of his house;" the latter, by his making 
" all things after the pattern shown unto him in the mount;" and wheil 
Abraham was called upon to sacrifice his son, he displayed the fruit or 
gi'ace of the Spirit, by his immediate, though conscientious, submission. He 
acquiesced, not regarding his carnal reasoning, upon his own self-gratifi- 
cation in the enjoyment of his son; but, without murmuring, patiently en- 
dured the prospect of being deprived of Isaac, and by his own hand; and 
without reserve, concluded that the will of God concerning him was best; 
" accounting that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead; 
from whence he also received him in a figure."— Now, as a cheerful obe- 
dience to all the will of God seems to be evidence of humility, so humil- 
ity appears to be the evidence of fear, love, faith and hope in God; for 
every act of condescension and quiet suffering, not proceeding from these, 
would only be the appearance of it. Now, if in this way obedience is ren- 
dered to God or man, it would, of course, be done from bad motives; 
such as, to be esteemed a christian by their fellow men; to gain a higher 
station in the sight of God and men; to gain T;he approbation of God and 
a higher station in life; and, which is more ridiculous than all these, to 
obtain religion by becoming religious, or, in other words, to expect mercy 
for doing all this towards God: and if towards man, it would be, no doubt, 
to gain some self-benefit; all which and more also would be nothing, but 
"voluntary humility," and the worshiping, of angels; and nothing more 
than what Satan, who is king over all the children of pride, is capable of 
doing; for he descended low enough once, to get into a serpent; and He- 
rod did many things, and heard the man clothed in a rough garment 
preach the gospel with gladness; and Judas, when following the Lord 



Jesus, on a certain occasion, became humble enough to reavember the 
poor. Humility is joined with faith and hope, as seen by the conduct of 
the three Hebrews. They refused to fall down and worship the golden 
image, set up by the King, in the plain of fJura, though commanded by 
his own mouth, and that with threatnings of immediate death, he having 
their bodies completely in his power, manifesting plainly this grace by 
their trust, confidence and hope in God; yet it is the part of the humble 
to obey all in authority when their commands are not contrary to those 
of God. Let us pass on and just remark, that this grace is also discovered 
in David vvjien he rejoiced in the will of God concerning his chastise- 
msMito from his hand; and the contrary of it in Saul, when he went to the 
woman at Endor.- Humility is a necessary ingredient in the proper per- 
formance of all our duties, as prayer, watchfulness, charity. Sec. It is 
the mark by which the christian is known; and. it is consistent with the 
highest dignity. We have endeavoured to bring to your view this fruit of 
the Spirit, by setting before you some of the acts of som.e of the Saints of 
old while under the exercise of fear, love, faith and hope, which are the 
root of it. But every manifestation of humility, however great, set forth 
by men or angels, is entirely eclipsed, or vanishes when compared with 
the amazing glory of it, shining in the Lord Jesus, who is the second 
person in the Trinity; the co-eternal Son of God; by whom all things 
were made, and are now kept in existence; whom angels and archangels 
sweetly obey, trust, thank, praise, and adore. " Who, being in the form" 
of God. thought it not robbery to be equal with God: but made himself 
of i!o reputation — and being found in fashion as a man, he hunjbled him- 
acif and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross." " Be 
astonished, O heavens! at this." That he should do all this for his great 
love towards mankind through his enemies! " Who is like unto the Lord 
our God, who dwelleth on high." — " Who humbleth himself to behold 
the things that are in heaven, and on the earth." 

We come now to inculcate the habitual exercise, or the practical use 
of humility. First, then, we would remark, that a just view of the glory 
of God, displayed in his goodness to mankind through Christ, is hum- 
bling to the soul: vv-itness Isaiah, Daniel, and others, while experiencing 
a feeling sense of this. To practice this virtue, or this manifestation of all 
virtue, it would be well to bear in mind our sinful state by nature, as re- 
presented by the Holy Scriptures. Frequent meditation on this, and also 
on our daily transgressions against the Supreme Being, either by omis- 
sion or commission, will lead us to own, that we have^ nothing good, but 
what we have received; consequently, boasting is excluded, and we feel 
thankful for the least of his mercies granted us freely. With this also; to 
tliink often upon that gift which the Father harh bestowed on us. Hov/ 
ke, who is absolutely independent and unchangeable, did not spare his 
equal Son, but hath delivered him up for us all; how this Son "was made 
sin for us who knew no sin, that we might be made the righteousness of 
God in him;" how he restored that he took not away, brought in an ever- 
lasting righteousness, destroyed him that had the power of death, bore 
our sins in his own body on the tree; and how he hath ascended up on 
high at the right hand of God, whei'e he ever lives to make intercession 
for us. All this he hath done, and more also, not for any thing good in 



tjs, but for his own mei'cy'ri sake; " for we ourselves also were sometlrtles 
foolish, disobedient, living in malice and envy." — " But after that the 
kindness and love of God our Saviour towards man appeared, noc by 
works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy 
he saved us," &c. Moreover, the mighty power, the infinite wisdom, the 
unbounded justice, and, in a particular manner, the holiness of God, are 
all of them subjects the mind contemplates on, with profit and comfort, 
in the practical use of humility. Because this leads the mind from dwel- 
ling on its own beauty and powers to dwell on those of Christ; the heart 
being affected from a right view of Christ and of what he has done, and 
suffered in our room and stead; " the soul is humbled within us, therefore 
there is hope." — The habitual exercise of humility is inculcated from 
b'Jth precept and example. When Jesus, the Lord of life and glory, was 
liere below, (and he is still here by his word and Spirit, for which we 
should be more thankful and humble,) he proposed himself for an exam- 
ple of this duty, saying, " Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for 
I am ' meek and lowly in heart;" and adds, for their as well as our com- 
fort and encouragement, "And ye shall find rest unto your souls." After 
he was baptised by John 'in Jordan, he was tempted of the Devil in the 
wilderness; and after this he came forth preaching his own everlasting 
gospel, saying " repent ye," &c. He suffered all the innocent infirmities 
of life, and did many things, which we cannot mention in this, which 
tended to display this grace; but we will name one or two more: Wiien 
his disciples needed particular instruction in this duty, " he set a little 
child in the midst of them, and said, * whosoever therefore shall humble 
himself as this little child, the same is greatest in the kingdom of hea- 
ven." Again, in one particular instance, he displayed his robe of humility 
in an eminent manner, and enforced the practical use of it, at this time, 
both by precept and example, on his apostles, now in the most needy and 
proper time: just before his last conflict with the world, with the powers 
of darkness, and with his father's wrath; and they all this very night 
were to be scattered abroad, every man to his own, "he riseth from sup- 
per and laid aside his garments, and took a towel and girded himself: 
After that he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples' 
feet." Now, if the Lord Redeemer, according to compact, laid aside his 
garments of glory, and descended from on high, girded with humility, 
and did all this, should not you all, O ye professing christians, and ye 
ministers of his especially, be clothed with it? that they may condescend 
to men of low estate, and that they may walk worthy of the vocation, 
wherewith they are called., not being puffed up for one against another; 
but that, with all lowliness and meekness, they may bear with and for- 
give one another. And also with this: continued reflections on the pro- 
mises of God, which are all firm in Christ; for what can be a greater sti- 
mulous to the glad performance of all known duties, and of this- one ir. 
particular, than to think often on the gracious words which proceeded 
out of his mouth, saying, " The Lord will save the humble person." " He 
raisetb the proud, and giveth grace to the humble." " I dwell in the 
high and holy place; with him also that is of a contrite and broken spi- 



Lastly. Humility is to be cultivated from the consideration of its et 
fects or consequences, in a moral as well as a religious sense. The truly 
humble man is the happy jnan, a«d happiness is pursued by aUnost all,' 
as the main object of desire; but it ought not to be; because, without holi- 
ness, there can be no real happiness; but these are inseparably connected 
with each other. A man also cannot have a better recommendation about 
him than this; it causes him to be honoured, feven by barbarians; it is the 
way to this before honour is humility;" and it is the way to dignity, and 
the way to riches, yea durable riches, and hence more desirable; whereas 
the opposite course tends to the greatest time misery and to future con- 
tinual shame and contempt; which things we should think no One would 
pursue; yet we hear words, too often, flowing from the mouths of some, 
which appear like it, if we may judge of desires by the sound of words.-^ 
It is a great remedy for the pain of human laughter, and for discontent 
and despair under divine chastisement; for the really humble, when ex- 
ercised aright, do not submit to any mean action, either to please or of- 
fend; and if ridiculed for that he hates himself for, he can readily bear itj 
but if guilty, how great is the pain! Hence we conclude, that if this fruit 
of the Spirit was more cherished, that truth would be more common; also 
every other vice of every description, would be guarded against and for- 
saken, and then it would be a golden age. Now, if we live in the love of 
vice, and, consequently, in the pursuit of it, do we not merit the contempt 
of our fellow-creatures? And if this gives so exquisite pain to us while 
here in the flesh, what must the pain and confusion be, in the great and 
notable day of God, if he should laugh at our calamity.^ But " blessed is 
the man that endureth chastening, i. e. of the Lord; tor when he is tried, 
he shall come forth as gold tried in the fire." Dear Brethren, let us think 
often on these things, and so walk in humility. 

We shall conclude in, or with the words of the apostle Paul, " Rejoice 
in the Lord always: and again I say rejoice. Let your moderation be 
known unto all men. Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, what- 
soever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, if there be any 
virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things." Amen. 

Humility gives sweet content. 
Unbending sinner, O repent! 
More shall be given where it is. 
Incline your heai't, the giver lives. 
Look on the proud, behold their fall, 
i will consume and giind them small; 
^Tis Jesus speaks, and <)! will He, 
Year after year, still bear with tuee. 

G. FENNELL, Moderator. 
A. MORRIS, Clerk. 



Printed by jBell & Lawrence, Raleig-h. 



kJTTrnT;^ ^ 



■OF THE 



€u$t-iftuv 3$u^tm ^umtiumn. 



ASSEMBLED AT 



Bear Marsk Meeting House^ Dujplia County* 
October 1, 1825, 



Prii^ted by J, Gales & SoTu- 




?Vf ? 7 



^ 



vx^ 



MINUTES. , 

Saturday, October 1. 

1. The introductory discourse whs preached by Elder Jesse Ro- 
gers, from Dcut. xxxii, 9 — " The Lords portion is his People.'' 

2. Convened in an associate capacity ; called ovei* the Chui'ches, 
a lar^e majority answered to their names. Fniceeded to re-appoint 
the same officers to .serve, namely, Elders G. Fennel), Moderator, 
A. Monis, Clerk, and J. Rhafield, Assistant Clerk. 

3. Invited coriespondinj^ delesijates from sister Associations, and 
other brethren in the ministry, to sit with us, whereon. Elders Cen- 
ter, from Raieii^h, and Bynam and Moye, fr(»m Neuse, received 
the right hand of fellowship from tiie Moderator, and took seats. 
Elder Biddle also sat in council witli us. 

4. Fixed a committee of Finance, consistin,^ of Brethren John 
Ina:ram, E. C. Gavin, and E. Pearsall, and proceeded to read the 
Church letters and minute the names of dele^^ates. Also called for 
and read the Cii'cular Letter whi( h was cordially received, autho- 
jisitiji; the Clerk to revise said letter, and make sucii arrangements 
as might he necessary for the press. 

5. x\ttended to a petitionary letter from a newly constituted 
Church in Duplin, called " Concord." On an examination, found 
said Cijurch orderly and oithodox, consequently most cordially 
recei\ed her as an independent member of our body. 

6. Observing that several letters implied a wish from their 
Churches that t'lis Association should be divided. Resolved, to 
submit the subject to the serious consideration of all the Churches 
in our union. And we request the Churches iiidividualiy to give 
theii- opinion on tlie subject, in their next lettej's to the Association 
as follows : »• Is it our wish that the Cape-Fear Ba[)tisr Associa- 
tion be divided into two distinct independent bodies, according to 
the following line, viz : Beginning at the mouth of Cape Fear, 
thence up to t!ie mouth of Black Ri\er, thence to the mouth of Big 
Coliei-y, below Lisbon, thence to the head of said Big Cohe*'y ?" 

7. Agreed that next Association be held at Union Meeting-liouse, 
formeily called Saddle-4ree, in Robeson county, commencing on 
Saturday before the first Sabbath in October, 1826. Introductory 
by EUler Morris, in case of failure Elder Fennell. Preaching to 
begin at 10 o'clock. Ap|)ointcd Elder Morris to write the Circu- 
lar Letter tor next association 

8. Aj)p()inted i'reacheis to occupy the stage on the Sabbath of 
t!ie picscnt m -ctitig, viz : Brethreti Crumpler, 'IMrames, Fennell 
and Bi<idlc. Pi'.aclsing to commence at 11 o^clock. Adjourned 
til! ?.Ioud.u' 10 oVIork. Prayer by Brother Morris. 



SuNDAi, October 2. 

The preachers appointed to the staa^e met an unusual crowded 
assembly ; but owing to the incK-mency of the weathei-, theconi^re- 
gation was divided into two stp .rate auditories. Brother Biddie 
commenced in the meeting-house, from Esther x, 3, " For Mordccat 
the Jew was next unto &c." Parson Stanford, who attended our 
meeting on Sunday, followed from Isaiah xlv, 22, " Look unto me 
all the ends of the &c." Elder Fenneli led in service on the stage, 
preaching from JbAjixi, 25, " 1 am the resurrection and the life, 
&;c." Elder Thames followed from Zeph. iii, 12, " I will also 
leave the midst, &c." Elder Grumpier closed from 2 Cor, viii, ,^, 
♦' For ye know the grace of our Lord, &c." 



Monday, October 3. 

1. Met at 10 o'clock, prayer by Brother Goodman. The com- 
mittee of Finance ga\e in their report, and was discharged. 

2. Agreed to renew our correspondence with sister Associations, 
viz: the Charleston, the Raleigli, and the Neuse Associations.; 
^vhereon, appointed EMers J. Rogers a messenger to the Charles- 
ton, F'ennell to the Raleig!), and Morris to the Neuse 

3. Agreed to dissolve the the correspondence with missions, and 
relieve tlie secretary from that office, paying him one dollar and fif- 
ty cents for expenses sustained by iiim in his office. 

4. Requested Br!)ther Biddie to close the solemnities of.the ses- 
sion, by an appropriate sermon from the stage. 

5. llesolved, that this body express in the minutes a sense of 
gratitude to the inhabitants round about, for the generous hospital- 
ity and friendship manifested to bretliren and strangers during the 
session. Directed the clerk to print 500 minutes. Adjourned to 
time and place appointed. Prayer by Brother Biddie. 



Report of the Committee of Finance. 

Received from the Churches this yeai-, $32 72^ 

Remaining in fund, 77 70— $110 4^^ 

Paid for printing last year's minutes, 15 00 

Paid f.'lerk for his services, 14 00 

Paid Assistant Clerk, 4 00 

Paid Corresponding Secretary, 1 50 — 34 50 

$73 92.^ 

GEORGE FENNELL, Moderator. 
ALLEN MORRIS, Clrrk, 







■3 






"2 


-1 
1 





'■5 -^ 


Counties and Churches 


Delegates. 


=^ 


-5' 


■2 ' 2 


-5 


-3' 

5_1 




'2 S 


Sampson CousTr, 








I/.C. 


Mingo, 




















Cohery, 


John Crumplei', J. Stephens, 


23 


1 






1 


1 


167 


1 00 


Seven Miles, 




















New-Hope, 


John Chesnutt, S. Boon, 


2 












16 


1 00 


Beaulali, 


John Ingram, E. C. Gavin, 


1 








1 




24 


1 00 


Lisbon, 


Georg-e Fennell, G. Herring-, 














10 


75 


DfPLlX. 




















Bear Mnrsh, 


Allen Morris, H. Moose, 


5 


3 




1 




3 


41 


1 25 


Limestone, 


Jas. Rhdfield, P. Sutherland, 


2 


1 










o5 


1 00 


Muddy Creek, 


D. Sutherland, Jesse Brown, 


12 




3 








42 


1 00 


Nahunga, 


Edward Pearsall, E. Lee, 


4 












17 


1 00 


Island Creek, 


John Carroll, 


2 












48 


1 50 


Meadow M. H. 


James Murray Jacob Teachy, 


1 


4 










22 


1 00 


Concord, 


Gibson Sloan, Wiley Stallings, 


1 












25 


1 00 


ROBr.SUJT. 




















Ash|)o!e, 


Mat+hew Tones, E. Jernig-an, 


1 










4 


61 


1 50 


Bear Swamp, 


S. B. Watson, 














13 


1 00 


Saddle Tree, 


John L. Holmes, 












1 


31 


1 00 


Burnt Islaiids, 


S. Pitman, 11. Mercer, 













1 


32 


I 00 


N^w HisayER, 




















' Bull Tail, 


Wm. Walls, Jesse Rog-ers, 


5 


2 


25 




2 





70 


2 00 


Maple Hill, 


K. Meeks, S Stuckey, 






2 






1 


o7 


1 00 


Riley's creek. 


Abel Morgan, Daniel George, 






1 


1 


1 




34 


1 00 


Wiiming-ton, 


Jonathan Bryan, 


14 




1 








43 


1 50 


Blauk.v, 




















Beaver dam. 


David Thames, J. Jessnp, 


8 




1 






1 


68 


50 


Big Swamp, 


Job Goodman, 11. Jones, 


1 










1 


51 


1 50 


Walker's BUi.T, 


Thomas Russ, 












1 


93 


1 00 


Onslow, 




















South West M. IL 


J. Langley, Simeon Williams, 




1 








1 


63 


1 5(» 


Yeopc's M. H. 




3 










1 


75 


2 00 


Cliapel Run, 


: : : 






1 




1 


2 


19 


1 00 


Columbus, 




















Wliite Marsh, 




















Scve;i Creeks, 


















■•■ 


Beaver dam. 


L. R. Simmons, Wm, Hayse, 


2 








1 


2 


67 


1 00 


Brunswick, 




















New Britain, 


: . . 


















Mill Greek, 


Joel Reaves, J. Portervine, 


1 




2 


1 




1 


37 


1 0» 


Cu5IBEllLA>il), 


• 


















Cape-Fear, 


John M'Daniel, C. M'AUister, 





4 


1 




2 


4 


129 


1 OS 


Thunder Swamp, 




















.Honey Camp. 


■ :*rarcc Griffin, J. Hodges, 










1 




17 


50 



By Elder G. FennelL 



Djear Buethrea', 

In our address tliis yrar, wc liavp made a few 
rcfliaiks for your j)pnisal, relative to covctoiisncss. This is a sub- 
je( 1 about wliicb we have seldom heard mueli said, either in the 
pulpit or from tlie press. Crin)es that are more easilj' seen, such 
as drunkeunoss, cursing and swearini;, sabbath-breaking, &c. are 
often exclaimed against, while this hidden sin, equally as dange- 
rous, if Fiot more so, instead of having its odious deformity ex- 
posed, a»id its evil tendencies brought to view, is suffered either to 
lie unnoticed, or is touched upon but sligiitly. Covetousness con- 
sists in an inordinate desire of eartlily things, or what belongs to 
oui; neighbour and a dissatisfaction with what we have, an over- 
anxious care about the things of this woild, a raj)acity in obtain- 
ing wealth, and a tenaciousness in keeping it. It is a vice tl)at 
vvondcrfully prevails uptsn and insinuates itself isito the heart of 
Vi\M\, perhaps for these reasons, it often bears sucli a near resem- 
blance to virtue, lying concealed under the false titles of industry 
and liugalit}, brings with it so many plausible reasons, and raises 
a man in the view of too many, to a state of rej)utation on account 
of his riches. But however plausible it may appear upon a super- 
ficial view, to examine the matter closely, there cannot be, as one 
observes, "a more unreasonable sin than this." lu t!ie first place 
it is unjust, only to covet is to he unjust, in pi'incij)le (and theprin- 
rij)!e is that by which actions are weighed \\\X\\ him who knows 
the intention of tiir heait.) The wretch who is serving or bowing 
down to this God Avai'o, instead of obeying the mandate of the 
blessed Saviour, *' do unto all men as you would have them do unto 
you," will wrong his fellow creature, use unfair means to pi-ocurc 
whatever spec ies of pi'operty Iiis wicked heart covets or desires, 
and cares not wlio sinks so he can swim, will take advantage of 
the necessities of otiiers, and use extortion towards them, even in 
the pi ice of the \cvy necessaries of life which he has to spare, and 
knows they cannot do without. In the next place, it is cruel. The 
covetous must harden themselves against the soi-rows and com- 
plaints of the needy and unfortunate, sometimes pi-etcnding to take 
refuge uisdcr tiiis passage of scripture, "if any provide not tor his 
ow-n, and espeiiallv those of liis own house, he hath denied tlie faith, 
and is worse l!ian an infidel," wlien, at the same time, he ct)uld 
spare a litiie to rclicNC the r.eccssitous and be none the poorer, or 



oot wron,^ l»is own family at all. He is much readier to ]>ity than 
to lielp, to say. '• be ye warned and be yc filled," tljantogivctlio.se 
things that are needful to the body. Indeed, sonic are so com- 
pletely nndei- tlie infiuent'e oftbis fiericious principle, tbat tlicy arc 
crnel to themselves, deny themselves and tlicir own families t!ic 
comforts and necessaries of life, in order to accnmulatc riches, 
showing plainly, tliat wealth is (he polar stai' wHh them, or thai 
the love of money is nppermost in their minds. Such should re- 
collect, that we brou_;^ht nothin,^' into this world, and it is certain 
we can carry nothinj^ out, and conclude that Solomon was ri,u;!tt 
when he said, "there is nothing better for a >nan tiian that he, 
should eat and drink and make his soul enjoy good in his labour." 
Meaning; probably that no temporal enjoMnent is better. In the 
thii'd place, to be covetous is to be un,a;ia'cful. The gieat thirst 
for strain wiiich the avaricious arc p;nilty of, renders rhem dissa- 
tisfied with what they possess, they envy tiiose who appear more 
prosperous than themselves, and instead of bein.aj thanktul for the 
blessings that the Father of Mercies has bestowed on them, notcon- 
sideiing how much more they receive than they deserve, how ma- 
ny in the world are worse off than they, and how much worse their 
situation might be, are ready to murmur and complain a'2;ainsr 
that kind hand that supports them. This is base ingratitude, and 
pioceeds fiom co\etousness. Lastly, co\elousness is idolatry. 
This we are plainly told by the Apostle Paul. And it is idolatry 
of the very worst kind, that of the heart, from whence God is ex- 
cluded, the creature worshipped more than the creator, and tisat 
confidence placed in sordid dust, which bclojigs to the gicat Su- 
preme alone. No wonder the Saviour said to liis Disciides, be- 
ware of covetousness, assui'ing them that a man's life consisteth 
Jiot in the abundance of the things he possesseth, and ititroduces tho 
case of a i-ich man whose gi-ound brought fortii plciitinilly, who 
seemed to place great dpj)endance in riches, saying to his soul 
*• thou hast much goods laid up for many yeais, take tli ne ease, 
&c.'' but in the sequel, shows covetousness to be a very f lolis'i 
thing, f(»r God said unto him, " thou fool, this night thy soul shaii 
be required of thee, then whose shall those tilings be which thou 
haht provided ?" 

Let such as are in the practice of tliis «in, consider the judg- 
jnfnts that have overtaken, and tlie punishments that h,\\v been in- 
flicted upon such characters. Acham coveted a Babylonish gar- 
ment and-a wedge of gold, which terminated in the destiuction of 
himself and family. Balaam s.^emed the Lord to know and to of- 
fend him boMi, yet Mammon proved his ovoi throw, for none can 
serve them both. Annanias and Sapphira, tlirongli coxetousness, 
kept back part of the price of the land, which drew down Ujion 
their guilty heads, the vengeance of Heaven in a very visible an<l 



8 • 

aiannin.^ niiuuici'. Let them remember also, that it excludes its 
votaries from tl»e kit»gdf»in «f lieavcii. The Apostle mentions it 
amone; t\iQ works of the tiesh, and declares "' they that do such 
thiiis;s siijili not iiilierit the kii!_^<lom of God." In writinj^ to his 
Coiiiifiiian btethrcn, he advises them, if any one that is called a 
brother i)e covetouH, with such an one, no not to eat. He also di- 
rected Timothy to withdraw from all such as supposed gain to b& 
godliness, and havincj food and raiment, therewith to be content: 
assnrini; him t!iat flsc *' love of money is the root of all evil," and 
as he said to Tiiiiothy, we say to yon, " dee these things, and fol- 
lov.' after ri^-htoiistiess, g-odlines" he. 

Tiie limits of a circular will not allow us to go at length into 
the stibject, one thing more however we wish to mention before we 
close. . It has been stated in some p.ubli'cations, and perhaps from 
the jjulpit and in private convei'sation too, that those who are op- 
posed to missionary exertions, are actuated by covetousness. — 
Thougli we fear this is the case with some, yet we have no doubt 
that there are many of the precious children of God, who earnestly 
. desire the success of the Gospel and the salvation of sinners, *'are 
zealous, kind, ready to distribute and willing to communicate, who 
feel a backwardness in supjsorting such exertions, because they 
fear it is not according to a *• thus saith the Lord." Then bretii- 
reti, on both sides of the question, let not him that gives, condemn' 
him tliat giveth not, and let not hitn tlrat withholdeth, judge him 
that givetii ; but let evo-y one be fully persuaded in his own mind, 
sashness und censure shoukl be avoided. It is admitted on all 
hands, that it is the duty of the people to support the gospel in 
some way. Then let the bi-etllrcn not fail to administer to the ne- 
I'cssitics of those who labour among them in word and doctrine. 
it is the duty of him that is taught in the woi'd, to communicate to 
him that tencheth in all good things. Tiie Ox that treadeth out. 
the corn should not be muzzled. Preacliers of the Gospel, as well 
•as others, ought also to be guarded against covetousness. "Let 
Ziori's Watchmen all awake und take the alarm they give." The 
Minister of the Sanctuary should tmt be greedy of filthy lucre, for 
it is dechu-ed in holy Vvrit, that •• a Bishop must not be covetous." 
In t!ic wor<ls of our Lord and Master, brethren, we exhort you to 
be\\ aie of covetousness.. May the Lord incline the hearts of h's 
peoj)le to do llicir duty, ar.d may Htaven's blessing follow for 
Christ's sake. GEORGE FENjNELL, Moderator 

ALLEN JMORHIS, C/er/r. ^ 









CAPE FEAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 



ASSEMBLED AT 



THE SADBLE TREE(^ 

ROBESON COUNTY, N. C. 
BEPT. 30; 1826. 



RAZi&XOB. 

PRINTED BY LAWRENCE & LEMAT, 
Printers to the St»te.. 



.Vi' 



MINUTHS, &a 



1. A Sermon, introductory to the Session, was preached accord- 
ing- to appointment, by Bi-otlier Morris, from <' Let brotherly love 
continue. Be not forgetful to entertain strangers," ^c. — Ileb. chap, 
xiii. verses 1^2. 

2. The members of the Association convened^ the list of Church- 
es was called over ; and, a majority being present, we proceeded to 
eject officers, namely : Brethren Goodman, moderator, Morris, 
cJork, and J. Ilafield, assistant. 

3. The Association opejied with prayer, by Brother J. Rogers | 
and a committee of Finance selected, consisting of Brethren Gavin, 
Allen and McDaniel. 

4. Invited Messengers and visiting brethren to sit with us; where- 
on Eldei's Center, from Raleigh, with minutes, McKay, from 
Charleston, with a packet, and Copcland, from the Moriah Associa- 
tion, took seats with us. 

5. Called for, and read the Church letters, and'enroUcd the 
Dames of the delegates. 

6. Read the Circular prepared by the Clerk — received \i .giving 
said author the privilege of correcting it, if he should think proper, 

7. On a fair investigation of the subject, agreed to divide the 
Cape-Fear Association according to the line designated in the mi- 
nutes of last year, viz. From Wilmington up the mouth of Black 
I'iver; thence to Lisbon; thence up Great Cohery to the Northern 
line of the Association. Agreed to call the Eastern division Go- 
shen Association, while the Western retains the name of Cape-Fear. 

8. The Association authorised the Committee of Finance to set- 
tle with the present Cierk, and divide the A. Fujid between the two 
bodies. 

9. Agreed to hold next Cape-Fear Association at Ashpole, Ro^*'- 
son, commencing Saturday before the 1st Sabbath in October. » 
Brother David Thomas is appointed to preach the intrc ' 

mon; in case of failure. Brother J. Goo'' 
mence at 10, A. M. ^ " 3r B /*" 

10. The ^' 



li. Agreed that Bretliren Morris, J. Rogers and Fcnnell eiulca- 
vor to visit the Cape-Fear Association at their next session, as a to- 
ken of union and friendship hetween the two bodies, witli an expec- 
tation of a like corn spondence on their part. 

12. Requested the Clerk to procure, if possible, against the next 
session of the Goshen Association, the original constitution of tiie 
Cape-Fear Association. 

13. Appointed to occupy the stage on Sunday, Brethren Copeland, 
McKay and Morris. Agreed to liave 400 copies of these minntes 
printed and distributed as usual, and concluded the business of this 
session by prayer to God. 

14. On the Sabbath, the preachers appointed to the stage inet, 
and commenced worship at 1 1 o'clock. Brother Morris preached 
from Rom.xi, 33, Elder McKay from Psalm Ixxxiv. 11, and El- 
der Copeland froniEzek. i. 10; and Brother Goodman closed by an 
appropriate recapitulation; also invited brethren and friends to hu- 
manity, to contribute (according to Saturday's resolution) in aid of 
Brother Johnson, of Duplin, an aged, infirm and wprnout Baptist 
preacher. A small collection was consequently taken. 

The Committee of Finance gave in their report, viz. 
Received of Churches this year, - - g24 05 

Remaining in fund, - - - - 75 9£g 

Paid for minutes of 1825, 

The Clerk for his services, - 14 .99 92g 

Assistant do. 
Elder Morris for visiting the N. A. 



47 



1826. Allowed in advance for printing 

ing this year's minutes, - 20 

Clerk for his services as usual - 14 



52 97^ 



34 



18 97$ 
J^oitIJ there he an error in the above allowances or calculations, 
w*vered, it shall be corrected. 

JOB GOODMAN, Mod^r. 
" ^ " ^l^f MORRIS, Clerk, 



C0UNTIE3 & cutrncniEs, 



DELEGATES. 





i. 
































1) 

03 


«u 


-a 




■a. 


-c 


S 




"C 
















SCI 


■^* 


^ 


^ 


w^ 


c; 



f' Mingo, 

I Cohcry, 
J 7 Mile, 
j New-Hope, 
, Beauluh, 
^Lisbon, 
rOeai" Marsl), 
1 Limestone, 
I Maday Creek, 
■^ Natiunga, 
I Islaiid Creek, 
I .NJeadow m, h. 
LConcord, 
fAshpole, 
j Bear swamp, S C 
j Saddle Tree, 
Lnurnt Island, 
TBulltail, 
'Z J Maple Hill, 
^ \ Riley's Creek, 
Lwilmlngton, 
Beaverdam, 
Big Swamp, 
Walker's BlufF, 
South W. M, H. 
Q b 'i Yeope's M. H. 
"" Cliapel Run, 
White Marsh, 
7 Creeks, 
Beaverdam, 



. ! New Britain, 
[ t < Mill Creek, 
I - i Cape-Fear, 

1 < Honey Camp, 



R. Brown, J. Mathis, 29 

Jonathan Goore, 

E. C. Gavin, R. Byrd, 

Tliomas Vann, 

Allen Morris, H. Swinson, 

•h'.s. Rafield, 

Benjamin Pagget, 6 

E. Lee, A. Best, i 

H Stallings, 6 

Jas. Mmray, 

Gibson Sloan, 1 

John Pitman, Wm. Thomson, 29 

B. .\llen, J. Elvinslon, 18 

John Umphrey, 

Jacob Freeman, 

Jesse Rogers, 

Joshua Penny, 

David Th-ames, 
Job Goodman, 



J. Howard, J. Gornto, 

As last }'ear, 

Luke R. Simmons, C. Spivey, 
Joel Little, 

Jno. M'Daniel, 



Pearce GrifRn, J. "WlHiams, 19 



1 1> 

1 

4 



1 2 



2 
1 

0\ 2 



2 161 



Si 50 



15 

23 
10 
46 
48 
50 
18 
53 
22 
24 
84 
28 
28 
33 
70 

45 

74 
53 



2 73 



00 
75 
75 
20 
50 
02i 
00 
80 
00 
00 
50 
50 
00 
00 
55 



83 



127 



36 



1 00 



50 
1 50 



2 00 
1 00 
1 00 

1 00 
75 



CIUCULA.!! LETTER. 



The Cape-Fear Baptist ^issc "iation io 



Dear Bret 

.onncxioii wlii 




6 

\vorl(Hjing in wickedness. Tiip people of G.'id are consideied " as pii' 
grims and strangers in the world." A pilgrim irs a wajCariiig man— a pass- 
ing stranger. Let him therefore be caieful liow he treads the thornj 
road, otherwise he may fall into those temptations which pierce with ma- 
ny sorrows. Strangers are exposed to insult and misusage, in conse- 
quence of the hidden character they sustain as to (heir origin, kindred, 
&c. So with .Saints, " as unknown, and yet well known," ihey aie in per- 
petual uncertainty with regard to the treatment they may meet with, or the 
reception tliey may find in a world of ungodly ipeji. Jesus was a strangejc 
on earth., and though tiie people heard him gladly atone tTme, wondering at 
the gracious words he spake; how soon is he the object of iheir malicious 
persecutions, while they lead him to the brow of the hill whereon their rity 
was built, that tliey might cast him down head-long! But he escaped out 
of (heir hands — their enmity originated in thejr obstinate hatred to the 
truth, which appears from the doctrine that gave offence, namely, that of 
xilectiou illustrated in the allusion to the poor widow in the days of Elias, 
and the leprous Naatnan of Syiia, the one lad and the other healed; dis- 
criminating grace rendered glarious in both — see Luke, chap. 4th,~25lh v. 
The true christain is represented in scripture as sojourning in a strange 
country, and may very justly consider iiimselfas at a distance from iiomc. 
New objects often arise to him v,ho literally travels in foreign regions. 
And so with him who follows Christ. The Apostle Peter was aware of 
this, and says, " Beloved think it not strange concerning the fiery trial, 
\vhich is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto -you; but 
x-ejoice, inasmuch as je are partakers of Christ's suiiering." We iind 
from experience, numerous unforseen events and unexpected trials await 
vs, which induce the poor wandering stranger to realize himself, far froija 
the realms of perfect peace and tranquillity. The christian ia also consi- 
dered as dwelling in an enemy's land: hence we discern clearly the impe- 
rious duty of sobriety, moderation and watchl'ulness. "SVlnle we are not 
to view unrenewed men as common enemies, (but many o! them as wor- 
thy, though temporal friends,) yet we are to remember tliat there ever has 
been an enmity bet\yeen tl'.e seed of the v/oman and that of the ser^'jent. 
Hence men of corrupt minds are liable at any i'uno, as occasion may otter, 
to appear in their true character, even in opposition to Emanuei'ij king- 
dom. Mark well the language of Jesus to las disciples, " it the v.'orld hate 
vou, ye know that it hated me before it hated ^'ou: if ye were of the world, 
world would love Ids own, but because ye are not of the world — thcre- 
'"orld hateth you." Tiie idea of a sacred unity and a divine sep- 
vr; ■ 0,- world, is connected with the (rue Church of Christ. We 
^'^at in a strong and scriptural sense, there i§ 
• " *y-'^<^ world and the children of 
"p.d bretliren, in the 
' strength, to aid 



LIST OF MINISTERS, DELEGATES, &c. 



\>^;^>S 



\?^SA>^?i>>^ 



Counties 

and 
Churches. 



1. Bladen, 
Beaver Dam. 

2. Bladen, 
Big Swamp. 

5. Brunswick, 
Lock wood's Folly. 
4. Bladen, 
Walker's Bluff. 

§. Columbus, 
White Marsh. 

6. Columbus, 
Seven Creeks. 

7. Cumberland) 
Cape-Fear. 

8. Duplin, 
Beat Marsh. 

9. Dup'iln, 
Muddy Cfeek. 

10. Dupl.n, 
Limestf ne. 

11. Duplin, 
Nahonj^o. 

12. Duplin, 
Islanc?.' Creek. 

13. New Hanover, 
Bull Tail. 

14. New Hanover, 
Wiln>ington. 

i5. ?^ew Hanover, 
Maple Hill. 

16. ()nslow, 
South -West. 

17. 'Onslow, 

Yo'pes' Meeting House. 

18. Robeson, 
4ish Pole. 
39. Robeson, 
Saddle Tree. 
£0. Robeson, 
Bear Swamp. 
21. Sampson, 
Mingo. 

322. Sampson, 
Cohary. 

23. Sampson, 
Seven Miles. 

24. Sampson, 
Beaulah. 

25. Sampson, 
Hornet Meeting House. 

26. Onslow, 
Chapel Run. 

27. Wayne, 
Thunder Swamp. 

28. New Hanover, 
Riley's Creek. 

29. Sampson, 
'New Hope. 



Ministers 

and 
Bele spates. 



\ David Thyms, 
; William Wilkinson. 
Job Goodman, 
George Lelling. 



I Charles M'Allester, 
I John M'Danald. 

I A. MORRISS, 

I John Oliver. 
\ N. Waller, 
I John Brooks. 
5 Jaims liaphieldf 
i J. Williainson. 
I B. Best, 
I John Thomas. 
5 R. Chasen, 

5 Hutchinson. 

I William Wells, 
t Samuel Buxton. 



I John Screws, 
5 M. Mobly. 

i Langly, 

f Pitt. 

I John Gohnto, 
I Daniel Nixon. 
5 M. Jones. 
5 Jacob BriU. 
|B. Britt,^ 
J Jacob Freeman. 

I 5 By letter. 

< William Layton, 
I J. Starling. 

< Cary Tool, 

5 John Stevens. 
I Simon Hobbs, 
I J. Woodard. 
? Jt)hn Ingram, 
I F. Shines. 



I Williams Cox, 
I B. Johnston. 
S Jethro Oats, 
I L. Rouse. 
5 Daniel George, 
I J. Canidy. 

1 John Carroll. 



Total, 



|s| |ft^ ^O ftj |b J! 



I el I i t 



A 4 4 A 4 



^1 



|s . . . 
? 5 S I I 
i I I I i I 

2l I si ll I 

MM 



li IS ? i 

M ^ M 

I ij 21 2j I I 



M 



ill 
I J I I 



I I 'J 
1^ I 1 



i I 



i ^i 



i I 



I i i i I 
I i i I J I 

I 1^ ^ 1^ 2^ ^ 

«• * > ? ^ ? 

? 9S ^ ? 1? ? 
If 



I I c I 

; I ^ :s 

; ■ i ^ C -fe 

: P^ C § 

'_• 5 ^ c " 

•^ ? s (J s 



I C 



ll 



1 50 



1 70 



I I I I \ \ f 2I 12^ 1 ^ 

I 57 ^48^43^10^ 9^12^15^14800 38 50© 19^5 



N. B. — Tho?e names in smali, capitais are Ordained Ministers. Dashes ( — 
therefore their number are as last year. Those in Italic are Licenced Preachers. 



-) denotes no intelligence.